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How to answer extended response math questions

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How to answer extended response math questions
Old 08-30-2010, 05:13 PM
 
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Anybody have a good strategy they use to teach the kiddos how to answer the extended response math questions on the standardized tests???


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students evaluate their responses
Old 08-31-2010, 05:33 AM
 
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I have the students give it a try. I stress the importance of labelling their answers. At least on ours there are three or four parts to each answer and they will get points taken off if they do not label (for example, part A). Then I copy some of the student responses onto the overhead. We compare my student responses to the samples that our state has given us for a score of 1-4 and the students describe what grade they would give our student for their response. I keep them anonymous. Then we do another sample item and review again. I keep repeating this until I know the class understands how to respond to several types of questions.
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No Thinking!
Old 08-31-2010, 08:28 AM
 
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I use a strategy I learned at a grant-writing workshop. The idea is that you do not want the reader to have to think about your response - no "I wonder if he meant to say..." You want it to be crystal clear so that the reader does not have to think about whether or not it is correct - it should be spelled out so that the reader does No Thinking!

This is also a helpful mindset when writing substitute lesson plans.
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Old 08-31-2010, 08:38 AM
 
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For practice, all year, once a week, I give the students "Two Problems". It is just as it sounds, two open ended problems. They aren't super difficult, just take explaining and reasoning. (ie: Sam say 2 is not prime because it is even. Is he correct? Explain your answer.)

When I pass the problems out, the students read them to themselves first. Then I ask them if someone can tell me what the author is asking them to do. The kids tell me, we clear up any "comprehension" misconceptions, and then they have 5 silent, alone minutes to work. After 5 mins is up, they have 10 mins to work as a pair to complete both problems. Then, while this is happening, I am walking around, asking guiding questions, or helping without giving the answer. I also look for examples of different strategies being used. I pick up two or three papers to share on the ELMO.

For 15 mins, we do anonymous sharing. I put a paper on the ELMO (without a name showing) and ask the kids what they think was going on in the solver's mind. We discuss the strategies used. Then I show a different one, point out any mistakes, talk about strategy, how it is different from the previous one, etc....

In the beginning of the year, it does take a bit longer than the 5-10-15 model I described. But once they have done it a few times, they really do get what I want them to do, and the whole process goes rather quickly. They are then able to reason through those problems on the state test with ease because they have had so much practice looking at not only theirs, but others as well.
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Old 08-31-2010, 05:23 PM
 
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When I teach my kids how to write a response to a part 2 type math problem, we use a consistently worded formula.

To find out (repeat question)
I need to know (repeat relevant facts)
First I, Then I (step by step on how problem was solved)
My answer is (state answer with label)

for example if a question was: Bob ate 6 grapes and Kim ate 2 times as many grapes. How many grapes did they eat together the written response would look like this

To find out how many grapes Kim and Bob ate I need to know that Bob ate 6 grapes and Kim ate 2 times as many grapes as Bob. First I multiplied 6x2=12 to find out how many grapes Kim ate. Then I added 12+6=18. My answer is Bob and Kim ate 18 grapes.


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Four Essential Questions
Old 09-01-2010, 04:08 PM
 
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Hi,

I posted this before- so pardon the repetition if you were a part of that thread.

I do problem solving with my students regularly. Before trying to solve the problem, I ask them to answer the Four Essential Questions-
1. what is the problem about? (type of math)
2. What's my answer going to look like? (am i suppose to make a graph, draw a picture, or write a response...)
3. What's my plan? (Strategy)
4. How do I prove I am correct?

I model this with the students, they do responses with partners, and then work on their own responses. (I do this trhoughout the year.)

After, they plan their work (using those questions),they actuallly solve the problem. Once they have solved the problem, they write their explanation using the four essential questions.

For example: This problem was really about multiplicaiton. Janet had 300 apples altogether in the 6 baskets. My plan was to multiply 50 apples times 6 baskets. To prove my work is correct, I divided 300 (total apples) by 50 (apples in each basket) and I got 6 baskets.


-Erica
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:34 PM
 
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that was not really what i was looking for but thanks anyway
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Old 03-10-2011, 11:51 AM
 
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I use a "T-chart" method. The students make a large T on the paper...on the left side they write what they did and on the right side they write why they did it.

I found this helps kids that really struggle with writing for extended response keep things in order.

I tell them to do some work - then write what they did, why they did it & then do more work if needed, write what & why, repeat as much as needed.

We really work on pulling words from the problem as part of their why responses. Especially the 3rd, 4th & 5th grade students. Once they hit junior high we try to paraphrase instead of use exact words.

Early on I make them do the whats & whys orally...they have to stand up & say it - you're probably asking students why after they answer a normal math question during the course of a lesson - they're just writing down what they want to say.

I've even had kids scribe for each other & switch off.

It's a challenge, but in my building we've made a decision to keep it consistent from 3rd through 8th grade. They all use a t-chart. I do have some junior high kids that can do it paragraph form but many keep with the what/why chart for ease of organization.
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