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Wild Kids - HELP!

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Wild Kids - HELP!
Old 05-04-2011, 08:41 AM
 
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I really need some strategies for dealing with some of my students who have a tendency to get really wild: playing and making loud noises at circle, trowing and mistreating toys, roughhousing, climbing furniture, running and yelling inside. It's really one kid who gets them all going, but they seem to feed off each other and it's getting worse. Circle is a nightmare. I can't get them to sit for 2 minutes to participate in any sort of discussion. I have finally resorted to giving them TO for running inside because it's gotten so bad (I have a hallway connecting my two rooms which makes it difficult to fix with furniture positioning). I could really use some strategies to help them calm down and get their attention. I've thought about trying a bell, but that's just more noise. I taught older children before, but those strategies (like sitting and waiting or pointing out who's following directions etc.) don't seem to work because these kids don't care. I have 3 and 4 year old by the way.
Please HELP!!!


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Old 05-04-2011, 10:51 AM
 
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First, set the expectations for the class. Make them simple. Mine are: "Walking Feet" "Quiet Voices" "Listening Ears" "Helping Hands" Make signs and refer to them OFTEN.

Next, set up consequences. I have an attendance pocket chart that doubles as my behavior management chart. If a child disobeys, they get a warning. Then, if the misbehavior continues, they move their nametag to the first level: 5 minutes timeout. If the misbehavior continues, the tag moves again and they miss 10 minutes of play time. Next, they miss all of play time.

A note goes home (and must be signed and returned) if the child misses play time. Kids this age do NOT want a note going home!

Don't give them an inch. Show them that you mean what you've said.

For the children whose tags do not move during the day, you may set up a reward system. I do not. I believe that good behavior is its own reward. However, since your room is in such chaos right now (and believe me, we've all been there!), you may want a reward as an incentive. Keep it VERY simple: a stamp on their hands, for example.

Good luck!
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Old 05-04-2011, 01:44 PM
 
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Everytime he acts up sit in him a timeout chair. If he spends the majority of the day in the chair, then that's what needs to happen.

As for circle time, you shut him down. In a strict voice say, "You do not get to interrupt me. You will not be rude to me or your friends."

If he continues, sit him in a chair all by himself. Then he can either sit there while the children play, or make a production out of it. "I have special prizes for all my wonderful and smart boys and girls that are sitting so nice for circle time." Give all the children who are still at the circle a nice prize. If little Timmy is out of the circle sitting in his chair, he gets nothing.


I don't use any bell, clap, whistle. I make sure the children know that when I am speaking, no one else gets to speak.
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Old 05-04-2011, 01:50 PM
 
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When toys are being misused or mistreated, I put the toy in 'time-out'. If the play center is not working, fights, yelling, I close the center.

For some groups, things don't change until everything is in time-out except crayons and books. But most groups shape up pretty fast. There is also a significant amount of peer pressure when a child gets the favorite toy put away for a week.
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Old 05-04-2011, 06:30 PM
 
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I do have the rules simply stated and posted in the room. I remind the children constantly of the rules and where they can do things (i.e. run outside). I also put toys in TO if they are being mistreated. However, this hasn't really helped. I can and do use TO as a tool, but I don't want them in TO all day. I have been putting them in TO a lot more recently, and was hoping to steer away from the negativity because I feel like it's creative a negative tone for my class and I don't want that. What I'm looking for are some positive ways I can get their attention and help them calm down. I have one with a sensory issue who has very poor impulse control and he is basically crawling out of his skin all day. I want to give him and the others positive ways to spend their energy and not be constantly punishing them.


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Old 05-04-2011, 07:00 PM
 
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I haven't given a TO this year to a child, just toys and centers.

Right now, I have one autistic boy and another with EBD issues. Circle time was tough enough with one, but the two have me a bit stressed by 3:00.

I don't think this is a 'proper' way to deal with it, but it works.
I have a large bag of M & M's next to my chair. If I am reading a story, I will give everyone who is sitting listening to my story an M & M. At first or on bad days, they might earn several during a story. As things get better I reduce the offers. I tell the children I appeciate those who are following the rules. I try to make sure that all the kids get at least one candy here and there. However, I usually just get the candy out when there are problems. It works.
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Old 05-04-2011, 11:34 PM
 
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I've tried all of these. My biggest problem is that the administration at my private daycare doesn't want to back up any of my strategies. I have a teaching degree (BA) and feel that I know a little something about classroom management.
I have the same rules that Ruby posted ( "Walking Feet" "Quiet Voices" "Listening Ears" "Helping Hands") on my wall and we revisit them SEVERAL times a day. TO is enforced, as well as treats.

Have tried talking to parents-Owner does not like this since it makes parents uphappy to hear everyday that their child is misbehaving (Well no joke, that's the point, if mom/dad is unhappy maybe they can make child redirect his/her behavior). So now we can only say positive stuff to parents unless it is something really bad (biting, swearing, constant hitting) and then the owner talks to them and usually makes it out to sound like it's not really that bad-kids will be kids

Have tried a rewards/consequences chart-Owner nixed that after the second week since it wasn't fair to the children that were constantly not getting rewards. The child/children would cry when they saw their friends getting rewards and not them (again making mom/dad unhappy). Again, that is the point!

Anyway the list goes on and on. I still have a treasure box (which she doesn't like) but I can only allow very infrequent visits to it so as not to upset the "little angels", usually it's the difficult ones that get to go on the rare occasions that they are good, because I want to encourage the behavior they showed that day, even though it doesn't seem to make them want to continue the behavior. I feel like my "good" children are getting a raw deal because I can't reward their behavior as often as I would like to.

I do like Valone's idea of putting toys/centers in TO, I am going to try to use that as well.
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Old 05-04-2011, 11:46 PM
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Old 05-05-2011, 02:50 PM
 
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First of all, I commend anyone who is teaching 3 and 4 year olds all day. I have 25 years experience with kindergartners and am now at a center with 3,4 and 5 year olds. I do specials which means I have only 3-4 children at a time and even then those little ones can be challenging.

Occasionally I have to be the classroom teacher for awhile...no problem with the 5 year olds, OK with the 4 year olds, pulling my hair out with the 3 year olds.

I have found a couple of things that work during circle time for me. One is changing my voice a lot....excited, sing song, whisper, etc. It seems to keep most of their attention wondering what I'm going to sound like next. I also have a "secret sitter"...tell them I'm watching someone and if that person sits properly the whole class will get something special (nothing edible, my center doesn't allow that ) But getting to jump up and down or stomping their feet or hold a stuffed animal seems to excite them enough to make the effort to sit properly.

I also recommend the use of puppets. Some children who will absolutely not sit still for the teacher will behave for a puppet. Who knows why, I don't question, I just use it

And slightly off-topic....I know a lot of people are against extrinsic rewards saying they should be learning to behave well because it's the right thing to do. I agree up to a point. These are very small children, they don't have a lot of abstract thinking skills, I see nothing wrong with an occasional concrete reward of a goldfish cracker or a sticker or an m&m. I was at an inservice the other day and they there was a lot of talk about intrinsic rewards for the children......and to get the teachers to participate the facilitator was passing out candy! So it's OK to reward teachers but not children?
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Old 05-05-2011, 04:09 PM
 
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Thanks for making me smile at the end of a long week (oh wait...there's more...tomorrow is Muffins with Mom...)
Anyway, your comment about using voices hit me. My kids have been LOVING Rhyming Dust Bunnies lately. I usually read it with great enthusiasm. I promise it at the end of the day if they have been good (subtle bribe). Anyway...today I really was tired from being with 13 four-year-olds all day when it came time to read it. One of the girls told me that it wasn't any fun because I wasn't reading it with the voices. Yes, I did get back in the spirit after her little comment

I am a huge fan of intrinsic rewards, but frankly my bunch have become so social over the course of the school year that there is no seating arrangement possible to keep all the chatting down. I wanted them to realize that they do need to quiet down and do their own work at least for a few minutes each day in preparation for kindergarten. I gave them sticker charts where they can go to the treasure box when they get 20 little frog stickers. It has worked for that. If someone is talking loudly, getting out of their chair, etc. during this brief time - they just don't get a sticker. They are getting the point as kids get to their second rounds at the treasure box because they are quiet workers.
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i understand
Old 05-06-2011, 02:29 PM
 
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I teach two years olds also at a private preschool. We do not get any support from our director either and it has been hard. I am taking a class now thats called "parenting with love and logic" and it actually has done great things for how I handle a stressfull situation. I dont give warnings any more you behavior or you get a natural consiquence which can be for exampl if you wont sit during circle you cant hear the book. I also do audio books sometimes and i hyped it up about how "special" and "cool" the audio books are and the kids think they are super special and thus behave better. I hope things settle down in your class. I know that in mine as soon as Christmas hit they just went wild.


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Old 05-14-2011, 09:36 PM
 
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is the kid with sensory issues in any kind of therapy.
my first teaching position I had 2 kids with sensory issues who were not in therapy. It was hard getting anyone to do anything the correct way. One of the kids finally started therapy and their therapist started having them wear a weighted down backpack. Just having that extra bit of weight helped them to settle down and focus. I've also found that a stuffed animal filled with beans, rice or sand can have the same results. Give it to them to hold during circle time.

One of my other tricks with the wild kids is to greet them with a big firm hug in the morning and to reward them with hugs throughout the day.

can you change your outside time and get them wore out before circle time?
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Old 05-29-2011, 07:53 PM
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a suggeston
Old 05-29-2011, 07:55 PM
 
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Try not giving the children sugar.
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