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3 boys de-railing meaningful read aloud
Old 05-09-2013, 06:02 PM
 
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I have put up with this for the past 2 days, gently reminding these 5th grade boys about the ways books help us understand and empathize with people similar to us and people from various cultures.

I am reading the book Esperanza Rising to my students. The past 2 days these boys giggle loudly and do not even try to stifle or hide their laughter when actually the story is not remotely funny! I have not even gotten to the sad part yet!

May I please get a few suggestions on dealing with these boys?

Today when they did it, I simply walked over to my desk, closed the book and very quietly asked the class to get ready to return to their homeroom, noticing we had 5 minutes left. I was afraid if I spoke to the boys I would say something I regret.

I did ask to speak with them after class. I told them that if they laugh/interrupt again, they will need to read the chapter I am reading in the library and answer a few questions when finished so the rest of the class can enjoy the text and learn from the writer's craft.

What should I do? soooo frustrating...

Thanks in advance!


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Stinkers
Old 05-09-2013, 07:33 PM
 
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All of us in 5th grade each have some real stinkers this year so we have agreed to ask disruptive students to leave and go to another 5th or 4th grade teacher's class (one per class if there are multiples). It's worked really well for us. They have to face the wall and sit silently. They hate it! Maybe you could talk to your team and see if someone would be willing to house one of your lovelies for you. Hang in there!
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Old 05-10-2013, 03:00 AM
 
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I'd be awfully tempted to make the disruptive students read aloud in my place.

But more practically, I like removing them from the room to have to read it on their own.
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Awesome advice
Old 05-10-2013, 06:29 AM
 
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It is sometimes difficult to make rational decisions when frustrated and your wise words really helped!

I think I will discuss the plan privately in a "friendly voice" before class today, so they will know the plan and I won't need to allow them to receive attention (that is what they are seeking!) by having a huge discussion.

Our team of 4 teachers uses a sticky note warning system. If a child is disruptive or unkind, etc., while we are teaching, we simply keep teaching and walk to that child's desk and place a sticky note on the desk, never disrupting the class discussion or demonstration.

The children know a sticky note means FIX IT. If they are able to fix it by the end of class, no prob. If however, there are more distractions, we continue teaching and go get the sticky note and quickly jot his or her name on the note and put it on our desks. This student receives a detention, NO QUESTIONS ASKED.

I have noticed these 3 students as FREQUENT FLYERS in morning or afternoon detentions, so I feel detentions and sticky notes are not working for them--They do not care and often giggle and talk during detention.

So for these 3, they will know if I am reading to the class and they laugh, I will put a sticky note on the desk and they are to immediately go to teacher X's room and read until I send for them to join us again.

HOWEVER...I know this text will be difficult for them to understand independently and if I provide them with questions, they are disrespectful enough to reply...BUT I CAN'T DO THIS. I DID NOT UNDERSTAND THE BOOK.

What if I set it up where upon getting a sticky note for laughing, they take their independent reading book instead of Esperanza Rising to teacher X class and write a reading response? and they can take Esperanza Rising home for their caretakers to read to them so they can answer questions?

Thoughts, suggestions?

You are wonderful!
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Try to refocus
Old 05-12-2013, 06:29 PM
 
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It helps me to think of sending students out more as a way to be able to teach the rest of the class instead of as a punishment for misbehaving students. The only thing you might want to do is email the parents to let them know that the offending students had to leave class because of their disruptive behavior and that they are responsible for making sure they have read the part they missed (and if it's too hard, the stinkers need to read it with a parent). I wouldn't do more than that. Just enjoy your read aloud with the rest of the class.


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no
Old 05-18-2013, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
What if I set it up where upon getting a sticky note for laughing, they take their independent reading book instead of Esperanza Rising to teacher X class and write a reading response? and they can take Esperanza Rising home for their caretakers to read to them so they can answer questions?
I think I would make them read the difficult book in the other class and if they can't answer the questions I'd give them a 0. Why should they be rewarded by being allowed to read a preferred book? If its too hard, then in order NOT to get a 0, you need to pay attention and take it seriously. No rewards for escape behavior.
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Old 05-21-2013, 05:34 AM
 
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Quote:
I think I would make them read the difficult book in the other class and if they can't answer the questions I'd give them a 0.
While I agree with you philosophically, in my class these guys don't care about a zero. I would make them go to the other class with Esperanza Rising to read. If they come back not understanding, then they are required to take it home and have someone read with them and discuss the book, and answer the questions. Be sure the caregivers know the reason for this, so the kids don't make you to be the bad guy: "I don't know why I have to read this stupid book at home!" Don't let them hijack the experience of reading this wonderful book to your class.
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Another possible activity
Old 05-21-2013, 08:32 AM
 
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If you have a vocabulary list from the book you are reading, have them write the entire definition of each word (using a dictionary). This is related to the activity they are missing and is a task they CAN do. They will also find it unpleasant, compared to listening.
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one more idea
Old 05-30-2013, 01:49 PM
 
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Do you have their parents' phone numbers? If so have them call their parents and explain themselves after they next disrupt your class. Even set it up before hand if you know how the parents will react. We all know about the parents who don't care as long as the kid is out of the house for the day.

When you do get done with the book, if you have internet access, there is a wonderful site based on Esperanza Rising. Let your students work with it in their free time.

http://www.scholastic.com/esperanza/
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Old 05-30-2013, 02:00 PM
 
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I stop and give them "the look". I've been told my look is pretty scary, haha. Anyway I stop and stare until they stop. Then I say something about can they handle mature 5th grade books or do they need something else to do. Then I continue to give a less intense "the look" for a few moments s to make sure they know it is not acceptable. If it happened again, I would stop and give them a lot of busy work that would need to be completed during free time.


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I'm liking this thread . . .
Old 06-01-2013, 01:23 PM
 
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lucydoodle--I sympathize with your predicament--our 5th team had some real behavior doozies this year and we found that removing them from class was the only answer . . . for everyone's sake.

I like the idea of sticky-note warnings. They are not disruptive, but can be very effective with good follow-through. I also like Phyllis's idea of dictionary/vocabulary assignments for use during the time in your buddy-teacher's classroom. We have found that assigning a task that is too difficult can result in the student trying to "connect" with students in the buddy classroom.

Great thinking, everyone. Can't wait to tune-up our system for next year!
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