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Funkyfresh67
 
 
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worst day ever
Old 01-10-2017, 02:48 PM
 
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I had the worst experience today subbing for a new teacher. The students were horrendous . None of the usual tricks worked. I'm also a student teacher and am concerned about the way the class seemed to totally disregard me. This was not my first time, but this was the first time I had an experience like this one. I want able to help students who needed me because of the students who were being disruptive. Trying to climb on the tables, throwing things, arguing and fighting, kicking the chairs. It was one thing after another! What the heck do you do, when they don't listen to reason or care if you write them up?

I don't want to be sending kids to tell principal's office because I know that just makes ME look bad.

It was just One class period out of the 6 classes, so I kind of feel like I had a group of crazzzzzzzy.

Any ideas?


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at what point
Old 01-10-2017, 03:08 PM
 
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Okay, at what point did you decide to have an admin come to the classroom instead of sending them?
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Old 01-10-2017, 05:15 PM
 
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I have one middle school that fits what you describe. I pick up the phone and call for campus support. I don't really care how admin feels it reflects on me. I fortunately don't cover this school much anymore. If I call early in the day, word gets around and my subsequent classes are much easier.
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Old 01-10-2017, 06:27 PM
 
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There are no phones in the classroom AND I was in a hallway that was isolated by the portables. There was no one near me. This district does not give you access to email either. I was on a flipping ISLAND! I couldn't leave my students alone, to go run and get a principal that was on the other side of the school. I just kept having to seperate the students, sit the next to me, move this one here, move that one here. It took up the whole time! If anyone had been on my hallway...
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If it makes you feel any better
Old 01-10-2017, 06:29 PM
 
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I was in about year 17 of teaching when I had THAT class. TWICE. A. DAY. because I taught them reading AND language arts. I had them just before lunch. It was doable....barely. Then I had them the final period of the day. NIGHTMARE. 27 kids. 9 with IEPs or 504 plans or who were ELL, 9 who just didn't care, and then the other nine nightmares. Well, three nightmares and 6 minions. I had administration in on the days when I wasn't sending them to the office. The three worst ended up spending almost the final 9 weeks being fed worksheets in the principal's office (at his recommendation, bless his heart) just so they would pass 8th grade. Actually, he couldn't trust them in the office, so sat them in the front vestibule where they could be seen, but so they were far enough apart not to be able to interact or destroy anything. Unfortunately, some classes are like that. It shouldn't reflect on you, especially if it was just one of 6 classes. I bet they aren't much better for their teacher.


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Old 01-11-2017, 04:24 AM
 
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Sometimes sending one sacrificial kid to the office has a salutory effect on the rest of the class. If I could not get them under control in the first 10-15 minutes of class, despite all my teacher tricks, I would do that.

If not, at least you tried. I'm sure this is a tough class for the regular teacher as well. Be sure to leave a note for the teacher...just state the facts. "This class was unable to settle down and work. The following students were particularly disruptive. (Describe some specific behaviors). I finally sent so-and-so to the office."

The nice thing about subbing is:

1. you don't need to deal with those kids again tomorrow!

2. you can choose not to sub for that teacher again if it was that awful.
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Old 01-11-2017, 12:06 PM
 
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Yeeaaah, I'd bet my bottom dollar they are a nightmare for the regular teacher as well.

Don't worry about what admin might think if you have to send a sacrificial kid (lol,lisa53!!) to the office, it sends a message to the rest of the knotheads you are serious. Sometimes, with a really off the chain class, it won't phase them, so you have to involve admin again, either by sending another kid down, or asking the P or AP to have a come to Jesus meeting with the class. We've all been there, either as classroom teachers, subs, or both.

Admin already knows these kids, trust me. I rarely send a kid to the office, b/c I feel I can handle most situations myself, but once in a blue moon...

From the description of the behavior, no phones in the classroom, and being on an island, I'd make a note and put this teacher on my "Oh, h*** no!!" list for the remainder of the year. Your sanity is worth quite a lot, and no sub needs to put up with that.
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Old 01-11-2017, 03:51 PM
 
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It is quite rare, but i have been in a few classes with no phone.

I would make sure I know the number of the school so I could call them on my cell phone.

Teachers basically need to follow the same "no cell phones" rule that the kids, do ,but they should forgive you under the circumstances.
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Old 01-13-2017, 06:44 AM
 
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Quote:
when they don't listen to reason or care if you write them up?
Well, one thing I would not do is write them up! There are two pieces of information that would be helpful... the age/grade and how many of the class were disruptive.

I recently subbed a class (second grade) that I'm somewhat "regular" in... the kids are usually good, but even the regular teacher advises, "Don't give them an inch." We had one of the wildest days I've every had--a perfect storm, if you will. Most of it driven by external factors--including a full moon, indoor recesses every day this week...

While I didn't have climbing, kicking, or throwing... the afternoon was especially difficult as they constantly chattered away, went off task, wouldn't stay in their seats... wanted to argue with each other and me... When situations like this arise, I remind myself of an important truth: the only behavior I can truly control in a classroom is my own. That means:
  • staying calm, using a calm but firm voice and not appearing to be rattled
  • choose battles (not really the best word) carefully
  • prioritze (part of choosing battles)--ignoring certain things can work
  • deal with situations as swiftly as possible--no lengthy explanations or justifications
  • change the activity--go off plan if necessary (I sometimes do "wiggle breaks.")
  • most important, know that you can't fix everything.

For example, one kid basically did not do a speck of work during one unit. He's known for this--normally you proximity manage him and offer frequent reminders but with everything else going on, I simply said to him, "Make sure your blank paper has your name on it. I want Mrs. Regular Teacher to know you decided not to do any work." (He wasn't being disruptive--mostly stared off into space.) I'm over-simplifying it a bit, but I think we have to make the kids responsible for their behavior rather than thinking we are. (Kicking, throwing, would be an exception--not an acceptable behavior.)

An example of changing the activity--at one point I stopped everything, had everyone put their heads on their desks. There's no peeking allowed... it may take a few minutes to get everyone in compliance, but it settles them and the room in general. It's not a punishment and I treat it as helping them focus. (Having admin come to the class might fit into this category, but I don't use that option.)

One other thing--I believe classes become "horrible" because of the sum of individual behaviors... if we can head off some of those, things are much more manageable. I try to address individual issues quickly and privately, removing the audience. (One tip: take the student to the back of the room, you face forward, he faces you and the wall. He's forced to focus on you and can't see his buddies' reaction.) When the sum of those individual behaviors adds up to chaos, change the activity for everyone--"wiggle breaks," "eyes on me" I've even seen teachers take the entire class for a walk. It's about group dynamics--people will sometimes do things because they get caught up in the moment (rock concerts come to mind).

At the end of the day after the kids had left, the teacher next door came over to my room and gave me a look that said, "Omigod they (her class) were horrible today." I know I felt better hearing that.
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Bad bebaivor
Old 02-26-2017, 04:26 PM
 
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Dear sub,
Don't give up. You've learned a lesson here. I too can relate. Always plan for the worse possible scenario, which includes phone numbers to security, office, others in adjacent rooms or portables (if any); and use your cell phone if that's your only resource. Try to identify troublemakers and get rid of them early on rather than later on. You lost a battle (which we all have), but I suspect that you're a good sub.; and you haven't lost the war.


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