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harpadzo harpadzo is offline
 
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Certification for Subs
Old 02-23-2017, 01:05 PM
 
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In your opinion, should sub teachers be state certified? Why? Why not?


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Yes.
Old 02-23-2017, 01:31 PM
 
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The state cert confirms a criminal background check, fingerprints and all that are on record.
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:36 PM
 
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I have a sub cert---which means they did a background check on me. No fingerprints were taken, and thee isn't any drug testing done. In this area, janitors go through more difficult job interview process than subs do (they have to do the background check, fingerprinting, drug testing, and an actual interview---sub interview consists of showing up to the orientation and you're hired).
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Subs should have at least a 4 year degree
Old 02-23-2017, 02:54 PM
 
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Teaching degree preferred. Although, of the 6 regular subs in our small building, 2 are former teachers (me and another who retired with me) and four with degrees. I have to say, two of the four are amazing. The other two are more than placeholders, but not much. There is also another certified teacher who has not taught full time in over 30 years, although she has subbed most of that time. She is really not very good. Even though we went to college together and were friends (still sort of are), I blocked her from subbing in my classroom hen I was teaching full time.
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harpadzo harpadzo is offline
 
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State Test for Subs
Old 02-23-2017, 03:28 PM
 
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By certification I mean passing state exams. Should subs be forced to pass state exams?


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Ca
Old 02-23-2017, 03:40 PM
 
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I have a BA, a credential, 20 years of full-time teaching experience, Federal Justice Dept. clearance with fingerprints and a background check, have passed the CBEST test and went through interviews and orientations.
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Subinnc Subinnc is offline
 
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No
Old 02-24-2017, 02:02 AM
 
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I have a BS but not in education. It does not make me a better sub than anyone else. The fact that I'm good at my job makes me better...but you can give me all the state tests, degrees or certifications you want to give me (or make me earn) and while it will make me more education, it's classroom experience and a little luck that makes me good. Mostly classroom experience and a willingness to pay attention and learn from good teachers...and bad ones.

So no, I don't think for what they pay subs here, a state certification is necessary.
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CC96 CC96 is offline
 
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I agree
Old 02-24-2017, 04:14 AM
 
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Classroom experience is more important than a piece of paper.
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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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My two cents...
Old 02-24-2017, 04:46 AM
 
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I think the bigger question might be "to what end?" -- meaning what are we trying to accomplish with some form of state certification?

The value of certification (particularly by any level of the government) is highly over-rated. Frankly, even the background check "certification" provides a false sense of security. All it certifies is that a person hasn't been caught. (I'm not suggesting it should be discontinued, just saying we should keep the value of it in perspective.)

In my opinion, most certification programs are intended to be exclusionary--they are not a guaranty or assurance of qualification. If anything, certification might "suggest" a minimum level of education. Having an education doesn't equate to being competent. A driver's license indicates a person managed to pass a test; it doesn't certify the person is a good driver.

If we want to exclude people from subbing, certification can be an effective mechanism. If we want to raise the quality and competence of subs there are some much more effective ways of achieving that.
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harpadzo harpadzo is offline
 
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Exams for Subs
Old 03-05-2017, 01:27 PM
 
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I agree that passing state exams does not make a teacher. What do you say?
Teaching is a natural gift; it cannot be taught through college training.


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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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"It depends..."
Old 03-06-2017, 02:47 AM
 
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Quote:
I agree that passing state exams does not make a teacher. What do you say?
Teaching is a natural gift; it cannot be taught through college training.
I think some of the fundamental qualities required to be a teacher are not easily taught--particularly at the college level. A couple of examples:
  • A love of learning
  • A love of children
  • A nurturing mindset
  • Flexible thinking skills

(I do think those qualities can be learned. But we won't engage in a nature versus nurture debate.) I know a lot of people (kids included) who are tired of being taught but are anxious to learn.

There's a lot that can be taught in a classroom including strategies and techniques. I think, however, one the great weaknesses in preparing teachers in college programs is how little time is spent in the classroom (student teaching). There's just too much emphasis on theory.

It's akin to trying to learn to play tennis without spending any time on the court.
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