Where were all the boys? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Substitute Teachers

Where were all the boys?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
c6g c6g is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 277
Full Member

c6g
 
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 277
Full Member
Where were all the boys?
Old 02-02-2018, 03:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I've been thinking about this for the last two weeks, and thought I'd get your thoughts.

I recently subbed for a fifth grade teacher, and spent part of the day with the class watching an intraschool academic competition involving other upper elementary students. No student was required to participate, but those who wanted to take part agreed to spend several lunch periods preparing. There might have also been a few before-school or after-school preparation sessions.

About 13 teams took part, and each had about five members. The competition was both friendly and exciting. I noticed something interesting. The overwhelming majority of participating students were girls. In the large group of about 65, only 15 or so were boys. As far as I can tell, the school has almost equal numbers of girls and boys.

It's fantastic that these girls are doing well. I could see they worked hard, and I'm predicting great things from them in the future! At the same time, it was disappointing to see so few boys participating. The ones who took part
did very well, but why were their numbers so low?

I've observed in many classrooms that the girls are usually the superior students, although there are exceptions. It seems to me that girls are leaving boys behind in the dust, and it isn't every close. Is this a problem? I'm not sure, and don't know what the answer is (if there is one).


c6g is offline   Reply With Quote

SubMan SubMan is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,399
Senior Member

SubMan
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,399
Senior Member

Old 02-03-2018, 04:12 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I'm not sure of the reasons. Boys are more frequently in special ed classrooms. I've been in spec ed rooms where there have been 15 boys and one girl and the girl seemed to be the smartest of the class.

Maybe it's because boys prefer more physical things like sports.

Or maybe girls (women) are taking over the world and guys (boys/men) don't know it yet.
SubMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Subtastic's Avatar
Subtastic Subtastic is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 339
Full Member

Subtastic
 
Subtastic's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 339
Full Member

Old 02-03-2018, 07:24 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

There is a gender imbalance - too few male teachers at the elementary level. And I've observed the boys are often unfairly punished for actions that would be natural in any other setting. The largely female staff doesn't seem to get that males don't act like females. They are louder, and more physical - whether its harmless rough housing at gym, swinging off a branch or jumping off a playground wall at recess. Maybe they want to play with other boys thus excluding the girl who then complains to the teacher about it. They and simply can't sit for hours at a time. Some are good at constructing things, but this is rarely incorporated into daily activities; they are more likely to be doing an essay/ math/ reading comp worksheet.
Subtastic is offline   Reply With Quote
MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,256
Senior Member

MaineSub
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,256
Senior Member
Lots of reasons...
Old 02-04-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

There are a lot of contributors... society tends to have an impact and that includes gender differences, both real and imagined. Local culture probably contributes, both at the school and community levels. I would concur that a lack of role models (teachers) can be a factor. And we canít leave out parental influence. I know one mom who is quite determined her daughter will participate in every sport this year. I wonder what the daughter would choose if given total freedom.

Itís been generally accepted that girls mature earlier, but I am not so sure. I think the kids are often meeting our expectations, regardless of how subtly we communicate them. Until our society values academics as much as sports (interesting this is Super Bowl weekend, eh?) we wonít see much change.

I am not sure itís a problem, but it is often a missed opportunity.
MaineSub is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Substitute Teachers
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:45 PM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net