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What are some signs of a Gifted child?

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What are some signs of a Gifted child?
Old 03-04-2006, 03:01 PM
 
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My son's teacher thinks that my son (5 yrs.) may be gifted which may be leading to his misbehavior in class. She keeps telling me that the reason he gets into trouble is because his is immature and bored. He makes noises in class and answers out of turn; although, he is getting better about that now. My son began reading at 3 years old, and now he reads and comprehends on a 4th grade level according to the STAR testing. He is studying everything he can get his hands on about sharks and rays. He has also memorized the states and capitals and the Human Body parts according to their proper scientific names. He seems to retain facts the first or second time after being exposed. When he comes across a topic that is interesting to him, he goes with it. He is very active at school. His preschool teachers wanted to tell me he was ADHD. He skipped the K-4 program because they knew he would be extremly bored. He is also very emotional, and will cry easily. I have been told, and read about this being a common theme with gifted children. Do those seem like signs of a gifted child? How do I get him tested? What should I do to get him the best education possible? I teach, and he goes to school at a small Christian school that does not really have resources to serve special needs children. We will be doing our annual testing at the end of March.


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Hey, your son is my son's clone...
Old 03-10-2006, 10:43 PM
 
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Although my boy was 4 when he started reading and doesn't know all of the state capitals...We had major issues in kindergarten because his birthday is the end of September and our district made us hold him until he was almost 6 before starting school. He was supremely bored and misbehaved constantly (lots of noises, talking out of turn). You're lucky your son's teacher can recognize his motivations - my son's called home every other day to complain, tried 3 different behavior modifcation strategies that I created for her, and still said she would be willing to give him challenges "when he learned to behave." Well. Thank heaven for our literacy specialist who pulled him out of class a few times a week and finally recommended he move up to 1st grade in December of last year, which meant he could also test for our EXCEL program (for gifted kids, starts in 2nd grade).

He is loving school again because in his regular classroom (EXCEL for 2nd graders is 1x/week only), his teacher appreciates his quirks and does challenge him in most areas. The EXCEL class is project-oriented and incorporates lots of higher level, creative thinking. Next year he will move to a full-time gifted 3rd grade class.

Does your district offer this type of program? Your son definitely sounds like a good candidate. And I think you'll be better off getting him into some sort of challenging environment sooner than later - my son is also very emotional and will cry when he's frustrated, but the younger-grade teachers get this and help him through it so he's not embarrassed. If he didn't get a handle on this now, it would be awkward when he's older and he might try to stifle his intelligence and just settle for doing 'regular' work. My husband was identified pretty late (4th grade) and spent one year in a gifted program before deciding it was way easier and more socially acceptable to not be the smart guy. He regrets that, and we didn't want our son to follow the same path. Having subbed in gifted middle school classrooms, it's pretty easy to see which kids (boys especially - girls at that age who've been pegged as smart usually stick with it) will bag EXCEL and go into the mainstream classes because they're starting to feel socially weird; typically they haven't been in the program & felt encouraged about their abilities for long.

Best of luck with your little man - keep us posted on what you find out.
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Thank you
Old 03-11-2006, 09:29 AM
 
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I am hoping to get him involved in some extra activities this summer, but our school does not really have services to offer GT kids. Right now I have in piano and we do a lot of "projects" at home that encourage his creativity and stretch him.
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social skills
Old 03-11-2006, 10:41 AM
 
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Your son does sound gifted - or at least advanced in his abilities. 2 out of 3 of my own children went through the same thing, as far as academics. They, however, never acted out in class - but that's probably just a difference in personalities. They had wonderful teachers that challenged them in class. Rather than them sitting through lessons of things they already knew, the teacher would let them work in learning centers of more challenging topics. They were still required to test on everything the rest of the class did, but that was never a problem. They went to a public school, so they were recommended for the gifted program when they were in 1st grade - that's the age they test them. The program actually starts in the 2nd grade. If your private school does not offer a gifted testing, check with your local public school to find out phone numbers to get him privately tested. The only problem at that point is what purpose testing will do if the school he's in doesn't offer a program for gifted kids. He'll still be in the same boat. Something I would address, however, is his acting out. I have 9 gifted kids in my classroom (out of 25) and they don't act out. They fly through work occasionally, but they always pay attention in class because they always have so much to offer on the topic. He can help other students, be given more challenging work, etc... that will channel that higher level thinking - but I don't tend to accept giftedness as an excuse for misbehavior. He still has to learn social skills, and right choices. That will carry him a long way in school and beyond.
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Some districts
Old 03-11-2006, 11:25 AM
 
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have magnet schools for gifted. Mine does, and we're not a rich district by any stretch of the imagination. Call the admin. building and ask. Maybe a neighboring district has a magnet school. I work at the magnet middle school for gifted, and am on the sixth grade gifted team (we're not gifted--our kids are!!! :-)) If he got into a gifted program, he wouldn't have to deal with teachers who won't differentiate for him. They'll not only differentiate; they'll challenge him daily. Also, they know more about the affective needs of the gifted (and there are many).

I agree with the poster above--misbehavior is not okay, just because a kid is gifted. I'm going to let you in on a little bit of teacher psychology here: please don't ever excuse your child's misbehavior as evidence of "boredom." You are going to get nowhere with your son's teachers if you do that. There is not a teacher I know who isn't really, really annoyed by that comment. This isn't meant to hurt, but children who misbehave, if neurological concerns such as ADHD are ruled out, are children who have not been given limits and guidelines concerning how they may and may not act. Even a child four years old picks up on the fact that mommy will defend his misbehavior every time, by saying he's bored. Remember, he's GIFTED. He is smart enough to figure out the difference between appropriate and non-appropriate, if he's given the guidance (and consequences) he needs at home. Yes, gifted children can often be more emotional than other children, less organized, but making noises in class is not okay, and does not have a thing to do with affective needs of the gifted.


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I agree
Old 03-11-2006, 04:47 PM
 
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Please believe me when I say that I am in no way trying to justify his misbehavior through giftedness. He has always been on the active side, and I am consistently trying to correct that when it comes to school and being in social settings. This is when he has trouble, at home he really is a very calm kid. I know he is socially immature and group settings make him nervous. I am a teacher, so I know what the comment "he's bored" does to teachers. His teacher is the one to mention that she thought he was bored.

She has been trying to challenge him and another girl, who is really ahead too. They have been doing independent SRA's on the second grade level in reading, but I think she has to spend a lot of time with some of the others who are very low in reading at the moment, so they do not get a lot of time with the teacher.

Our acheivement testing is coming up in a few weeks, and I am really curious to see how those turn out. I will look into magnet schoolsin our area too. What are some of the testing procedures he will be doing in a public school? I am sure it is not just an achievement type test. Would testing be something that would be covered with insurance or can it be done through public schools, just like testing for a learning disability?

Can a child be considered gifted in one area like Reading and be average in another area like Math? He picks up on concepts quickly, but his real talent is in the area of reading. He will read fiction, but he loves to read non-fiction even more.
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I'm sorry I put it that way.
Old 03-11-2006, 05:52 PM
 
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I apologize.

In the public district, testing for giftedness is free, I'm almost sure. It actually falls under the realm of special ed. in Colorado, which seems funny. They will do a COGAT (cognitive abilities test). I'm really not sure if that measure IQ or not. It does measure what percentile they fall into, in several different intelligences. It measures verbal ability, math logic, patterns, visual/spatial (whatever that means), some other areas. They do a Naglieri (in my district), which is supposed to be able to identify minority kids, as it's a test without language, as I understand it. It's culturally neutral is what they say, but I'm sure that's entirely possible. They also look at things like what competitions kids have won (older kids, obviously), or remarkable things produced, like art or music or writing. They have teachers and parents fill out questionaires about traits exhibited. They interview the child.

What happens next depends upon the district. Different districts have different criteria for judging giftedness. Usually, they have to fall into a predetermined percentile in at least one area. What that percentile is, again, depends on the district. In some districts, it's very high, like 98th percentile, in others, really pretty low, like 85th.

It is entirely common for a child to be gifted in one area and not another. It is UNCOMMON to be gifted across the board. A good gifted program lets him have GT instruction for his area of giftedness, say, lang. arts, but have mainstream math if he's average in that area. Schools do not have 100% flexibility in scheduling, so sometimes, compromises must be made in the areas of electives. This is not a great solution for the gifted, either, but something has to give somewhere.

A good gifted program will offer lots of hands-on experiences, will integrate technology and be consistently challenging. There should be research projects, presentations, field trips, accelerated curriculum, and opportunities to present what they've learned in creative ways, of their choosing.

Again, I'm sorry that I sounded like you're making excuses for your son. I'm getting you confused with my sister-in-law, who is a real pain in the rear for my nephew's teachers. He's being a little terror and all she does is insist he's bored. What he needs are consequences, but he's figured out he can act any old way and mom is just going to say that he's bored. He's rude is what he is. Gifted and rude. It's an awful combination. Sorry to cast such aspersions on you and your son. You sound like a great mom and a great teacher.
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I was not offended, but
Old 03-11-2006, 08:56 PM
 
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thank you. I really appreciate the wonderful information too. I am afraid that I will not do enough to help my son reach his full potential. I held him back in preschool for an extra year in hopes that he would mature, but now I regret that because I think he missed out on social skills needed for the very traditional class that he is in now. He is learning though which is a good thing.
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Good luck to you...
Old 03-12-2006, 10:08 PM
 
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..in my school, the EXCEL program , is more of a country club for the children of the rich and popular instead of a program for the truly gifted. I have seen children in the program that (pardon my language) "couldn't wipe their own butt" as my friend put it. Some of them can't even read on grade level or stay in th A.R. program w/out major help. Yet my son, (who tested out w/ a score of 126 and reads 2 grade levels ahead) was denied entrance. Why? Because I wasn't born and raised here, I don't own a business and I don't make enough money or have enough status here to be a "somebody", so my son is not a "name brand" kid.
His own teacher told the school "psychologist" that denied him entrance, that she was wrong. She has 2 children in her room that go to the "gifted program" and my son reads and spells circles around them. He has 70 points in AR and is the only child in 1st grade w/that many points that IS NOT in EXCEL.(Where they can read and test for 1 1/2 hours everyday, but my son can only do it in class sharing a computer w/20 other kids)
He was horrible in K and is now starting to act up again because he is bored. I can take care of that at home but there isn't much I can do during the school day.

Sorry this turned into such a rant, but I am soooo frustrated!
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Wow, that stinks!
Old 03-13-2006, 03:13 PM
 
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I'm sorry for your son's situation. That is so not okay.

Now if we could just get his teacher to meet his actual needs (which would NOT be AR--sorry, but it's not. In fact, a program, especially like AR, is stifling to a gifted child). I guess you will have to be his GT teacher. That's unfair to both of you.


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Thanks MaryTeach, but..
Old 03-16-2006, 01:29 AM
 
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his teacher's the only one that actually IS meeting his needs (or at least trying) besides my DH and myself. He LOVES doing AR! He started in Sept. but the other 1st graders didn't start until January.

A bit has happened since I last posted; they gave my son a PASS test (I'm not sure what it is, I teach K and we don't give it) but he tested out at the end of 2nd grade. A score of 26-32 is considered "Advanced Proficient" and he scored a 25 on each, math and reading.Now the school wants to put him in 2nd grade until the end of the year and send him on to 3rd next year. He is only 7 ! He still has all his baby teeth! I can't see a 7 year old in third grade, esp. as small as he is and he is very inmature (not unusual in smart children.) My gut reaction was a definate "No!"

The school that has 3rd grade also has 5th grade and a lot of big, rough, mean boys that have been repeating grades so long they are as big as me! They would just love to get ahold of a little geeky, brainy, not-too-street-wise boy and hassel him. I have already had to go to his teacher to get help for a 1st grader bullying him on the playground. I normally wouldn't do that , but it was getting severe.

So, to try to make a long story short, we have decided instead to leave him in first and add some extra activities to his schedule. He now gets to go to computer 3 days a week with a 2nd grade class and work in a second grade program. We are also going to try to convince the librarian to allow him 1 or 2 days a week of free library time when he can read "the good books" (nice, new, expository books that the kids never get to touch), and they are also going to ask a 2nd grade teacher if he can come in her room to observe science lessons.
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He loves doing AR because
Old 03-16-2006, 07:56 AM
 
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it's fun to take the test on the computer, and the books are easy for him. I'd love it too, but it's not helping him much. Always remember that programs are for teachers who don't know how to teach something (if I taught math, believe me, I'd need a program) and AR fits very neatly into that mold. It's easy to train a building full of teachers who only have 3-5 hours of reading instruction in their education major how to do AR--we have to, because 3-5 hours didn't teach them how to teach reading, and face it, folks: we need to teach reading! So we have programs to help teachers do that, but programs are the pits for the gifted, unless they're a specific program for gifted, and even then, I'm not crazy about it. That's because the gifted don't fit into programs. They need lots of time to do independent study, to try different approaches, to ask lots of questions. Theirs needs to be a very open-ended education. Programs are not open-ended. And you said it yourself--when he gets away from the AR materials, he gets to read the "good books." He should get to read the good books all the time, and the teacher should learn to differentiate and be very open-ended with him. We lose a lot of gifted kids to poor teaching.

I agree with you--a seven-year-old does not belong with those older kids. Differentiation CAN AND SHOULD happen within his classroom. I think going to the second grade to observe science lessons is a good idea, though.

All the teacher has to do is let him read the "good books" and write letters back and forth with him about it. It's not rocket science, really it's not, but first grade teachers can be incredibly rigid.
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Old 03-16-2006, 09:32 PM
 
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His teacher lets him read whatever he wants. It's the librarian that has a "hands off" attitude toward the books. I'm trying to figure out who DOES get to read the new books because all the books the kids check out are really old OLD books that are not very good. My son doesn't even read his book he checks out every week.
I know the library gets money for new books every year just like we get money for supplies. Where are the new books? Also, we did a "Reach for the Stars" fund raiser for the library last year with Usborne books. They have lots of great books! My son was the top money collector for the whole school (they got pledges for each minute of reading and he collected over $435.00.) He got 1/2 the money amount in books and the library got the other half. OKAY, where are those books? Who gets to read them?
And we also have lots and lots of quality books at home.
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Old 03-17-2006, 09:29 AM
 
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it was the librarian, not the teacher. Pretty scary librarian, huh? That's a really weird trait for a librarian to have--withholding books from kids.

Rubyslippers, your son is lucky you're his mom. You really do need to advocate for your gifted child. I would look for a magnet school, or a magnet program. Most districts have gifted programs. They'll be called GT or TAG, usually. There are other names for it, of course.

I do think that AR is the pits--for all kids, really, but especially the gifted. I don't like that reading becomes a competition, or that a child can only access the books he's "tested into." It's not an authentic reading experience. Earning points for reading doesn't make sense to me. I would not want to teach a child that reading is something that earns points. When we do that, we miss teaching kids the intrinsic motivation for reading, and without that, we do not have a reader. We have a test-taker and a point-earner, but not a READER.

I would get him away from AR, really I would.

Good luck. You sound like a great mom, and your son is lucky.
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Thank you for your compliments!
Old 03-17-2006, 10:23 PM
 
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There is no such thing as a magnet school in our county.

I don't see anything really negative about him doing AR as long as he reads books he selects himself and enjoys it. What I think is strange about AR is the point system. He only gets 1/2 a point per book. He can read Brown Bear, Brown Bear and get the same 1/2 point he would also get if he read a Berenstain Bears book which is much more wordy. I understand it is based on levels, but the way I see it, if he reads a level 1 book he should get 1 point. If he reads a level 3 book he should get 3 points, etc. He has already hit the max points for 1st grade and just keeps on going.

I also do not think it is fair that some teachers use AR points as a part of the students' reading grade.

The problem we are having currently is that he is soooo bored with the 1st grade work, that he is starting to get restless and whiny in class and doesn't want to do his paper work. I can't blame him. The other day he brought home a packet of papers stapled together that he didn't finish and had to do it as homework. On one page of math, they had the same problem (6+2= _) on the page 8 times! Then it had several other problems repeated 5 or 7 or 4 times. I had to make a game out of it to get him to finish. No wonder he doesn't want to do his work! And his teacher is insisting that he finish all of his work or he doesn't get to go to the extra computer classes, etc. they planned for him. If he knows how to do the work, why be so insistant that he do it?

Am I wrong to think so?

I think our county just doesn't know how to deal w/ a highly intelligent child because most of our students are just the opposite--they come from poor, under-educated homes and lack parental input in their early years. We are a school wide Title school. No only do we have preschool, we also have pre-k. We actually have children the same age as my son (7) who have been in school since they were 4 and still are not in 1st grade yet.( My son is just now in 1st grade because I held him out a year before k for inmaturity and he has a late July birthdate.)

She also felt like he was "discouraging" to the other students--which I didn't really understand. Something about the other kids give up because the children say "____ (my son)can do it faster." or "He reads better than I do."etc. My son doesn't say anything bad to the kids or mistreat them, so I don't understand what it has to do with him.
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Old 03-18-2006, 11:10 AM
 
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It has nothing to do with him. She's wrong to put that on your son. That's awful. Does she want him to just sit down, shut up and do first grade work? That's what it sounds like. You are right; he should be able to skip any lesson or its related independent component if he's already shown mastery of the material.

I highly recommend a book by Susan Winebrenner titled Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom (it's at school; that title may not be word-for-word correct). It's the best resource I know of for teaching gifted kids, and has been recommended on this board many times. It contains much help and information on compacting the curriculum, managing independent projects, and on and on. Most of all, though, it will validate what you already feel is true about your son and his education. You will have to advocate for him. This book can help you do that, and can help you help HIM with his education at home, if you have the time and inclination to do that. I'm not suggesting home schooling, although that would be fine, but just home enrichment, perhaps. And maybe, if it would be received in the right spirit, you could give a copy to your son's teacher next year (it's a little late for this year's teacher). I do so highly recommend this book.

What you think should be going on is right, and what you feel about this, in your gut, is also right. Keep your ears open. Sometimes, in a school full of people who just don't get it, there will be one or two teachers quietly doing best practice in their rooms, and those teachers would be the ones I would want for your son. I'm sure this year's teacher is a lovely person, but she doesn't get it, and that's too bad.

Good luck. Get that book (or a few copies!) and listen around for teachers/schools doing what you're looking for.
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I am so glad I have you to talk to!
Old 03-18-2006, 11:34 PM
 
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No one around here has had the same experience we have had w/our son. Not only is his intelligently gifted, he is also a "Spirited " child. Have you ever heard of that term? It basically means he is "more" of everything..more intelligent, more curious, more active, more emotional, more stubborn, etc etc about everything in life, from sleeping to eating to bathing to learning.
I work in my son's school. I get the "aura" that the other teachers think he is spoiled and undisciplined because of his behaviors. He still gets angry and fusses and cries and argues at times. I know this is due to his inmaturity, his giftedness and just his personality...but it is due mostly to being frustrated. Even his teacher admited that he didn't show any behavior problems until he started getting bored w/the cirriculum around Feb.
So, instead of working w/ this and around this, they discipline him for his angry outbursts. I don't mind him being disciplined (he requires "more" of that , too.) but I almost feel like they just do because they think I don't. They think he gets away w/bad behavior because 1. he does it over and over again and 2. we choose to discipline at home, not out in public.
Any time he accomplishes something extra (like being the top money collector for Math-a-thon in the whole school) they sorta down-play it. When they came to me to pick his prize, they never told me he was the top collector, only that he got a prize and I need to pick it out. They weren't even going to announce it until I asked the principal about it.
So I feel like if I go to anyone and suggest he doesn't really need to do the work (that's causing all the problems to begin with) or make any other suggestions about what would work best for him, they will just think he is being spoiled some more. I don't care what they think,but I don't want him to get a bad reputation around town and get talked about in the teacher's lounges.!
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:16 PM
 
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I hate to say it, but most "small Christian schools" do not offer special services to a highly-able, gifted child. You need to get him tested at a local state university or gifted center, using the Stanford Binet test form LM (considered one of the better tests for giftedness). If his scores and interview tests do indeed show that he is gifted, you need to present the test data to his school. If they do not have a teacher/admin/spec. team to meet about his needs, go to the nearest public school and inquire about their gifted program. As a taxpayer, your son would qualify for services regardless of attending a private school. They might want to do their own testing too.

I wish I had been on this board a while ago to catch this post. Your son may benefit from accelerated instruction, ability grouping, grade acceleration, enrichment...etc., but surely DIFFERENTIATION so that he stops acting out and can work to his potential.
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Sounds familiar . . .
Old 10-02-2006, 09:43 AM
 
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I am a teacher and also the parent of a first-grader who, from all indications, is gifted -- she has just turned 6 and reads at fourth grade level, has an incredible memory for facts, is highly emotional, plays the cello, is extremely impatient with herself, etc., etc., . . . . She attended kindergarten at a private Christian school, but is now in a multi-age room (grades 1/2) in our neighborhood elementary school. She is thriving, and her teacher (although we haven't had our first conference yet) seems to have keyed into her abilities, judging from the level of work she is bringing home. The gifted program doesn't begin until third grade in our school district, so we're hoping the multi-age program will keep her engaged in her school work. There is a lot of independent, center-based work, which she loves. If your district has a multi-age program, it might be worth looking into.
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I can totally emphatise with you....
Old 04-23-2007, 06:13 AM
 
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I have a son who turned 6, 2 weeks ago. We went through 6 months of emotional distress due to his previous teacher who misread his needs to learn more, do more, explore more (to satisfy his need to understand why and how things work) as him trying to be naughty. She even labelled him in front of his classmates and undermined his ability. She will give him reading books which he complains that is way too easy.

She will come to us saying that he can't read, he can't write, his work is untidy, he is loud and irresponsible, he can't socialise, he has speech problems and he is too self-interested to participate in class activities and the list goes on and on. Everyday we get bombarded with loads of complaints over minor issues and she even mentioned that she gave him time-outs because she felt that she needed a break from him and not because he deserves it.

It got to a point where we just had enough of the teacher and decided to have him assessed. It turned out that his IQ is in the 98th percentile and he is reading at 3rd grade level, depsite being in kindergarten (he is in a IB school and the kids in the class are just beginning to learn their ABCs). However, all is not perfect with our son as he is also diagnosed with sensory integration disorder. We now understand why he has a need to move around in class and his extreme reaction to certain type of noises.

Due to his "dual exceptionality", he is also more sensitive, more intense in his emotions, more strong willed, etc.

We are fortunate enough to have found a fantastic teacher for him (we had him transfered to another class). Not only is she understanding, she incorporates some "sensory" activities in the class to help him manage his sensoy needs. Now we are beginning to see our son producing work in colours, unlike in his previous class where his drawings are all in black and brown. And we are seeing a new person, a confident boy who is starting to enjoy school.
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josephineg josephineg is offline
 
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josephineg
 
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Asynchronous--yes!
Old 04-23-2007, 11:25 PM
 
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You wrote: "Can a child be considered gifted in one area like Reading and be average in another area like Math? He picks up on concepts quickly, but his real talent is in the area of reading. He will read fiction, but he loves to read non-fiction even more."

Yes. It is quite frequently the case that a child can be considered gifted in one area and can be average in another. It's called being asynchronous, and it's very common among the gifted. Sadly, there are educators and others who sometimes insist that what must be done is that the student must work to become "well-rounded"--as if those of us who are not gifted are all so well-rounded! Bunk!

As a gifted student, I used to love to read non-fiction, and still do. That's typical of the gifted, also, since they get to learn from their peers, ala "some of my best friends are books".

You mention social immaturity--that's an example of asynchonous traits, too. Being nervous in group settings could be due to a number of things--shyness, introversion (which is not at all the same as shyness, though they can co-exist), an earlier, similar experience that did not go well, feelings of low self-esteem due to feelings of not fitting in, etc.

As a strong introvert, I can tell you that I am frank about my general aversion to being in large groups. I tell people that as an introvert, I'm happy. There's nothing to "overcome" as some people have suggested to me throughout the course of my life. Most gifted persons are introverts. See the book: The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child. It will be a great help to you.

Based on my own personal experience and conversations with many gifted adults, as well as my own research, acceleration sounds like a generally good idea with the usual caveats. You are correct; most teachers have their hands full with so many other demands that it is practically guaranteed that they will not have the time and resources to provide the modifications that a gifted child needs and deserves. If you can try acceleration, even on a trial period, with on-going support and buy-in from all parties--that's the road I'd suggest.
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Amanda781220
 
 
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homeschooling my bright/gifted child
Old 01-31-2009, 07:39 PM
 
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my son is 8 now but ever since he was 2 he could do out rages things. He could add and subtract at 2 and say his abc and know there sounds.By schoolage he knew how to do long addition and subtraction problems.by 1st grade age 6 he could do fractions multiply divide. Basicly he do abt 2 years above his age in math. and its not stopping it is increasing. i took him out of school because they were not meeting his needs. We would do school work and turn around he would be doing math workbooks to alone with that.My son can do all the academic stuff a normal 4 th grader can do. He learns facts that stay with him never has to go back over any thing but, there is one thing he has trouble with everyday stuff like easy concepts. can not remember any easy concept.
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