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teachernyc teachernyc is offline
 
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teachernyc
 
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ESL in Primary Grades
Old 10-04-2009, 03:42 PM
 
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I'm an upper grade teacher with ten years of experience in grades 3-5 and was newly hired to teach ESL to Kindergarten and 1st grade students. Though I have my cert. in ESL and have taught ELLs in the mainstream classroom, I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed by the change in age and becoming a push-in teacher.

Any recommendations for working with this age group in a push-in only program? I'm concerned that the K classroom is such a busy place that if I'm pushing in and doing my own lesson, my students will have a hard time concentrating.

Also...any website/book recommendations?


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Push in
Old 10-07-2009, 04:53 PM
 
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When I hear push in (which i do too) I understand it to be how do you fit the curriculum to the child(ren). I work on assignments that the child has difficulty with.
I am just the opposite of you. I push in grades 3-6 after 18 years at the kindergarten and preschool level. I work particularly on analogies and vocabulary. I hope to get to writing as well.
I work on their assignments and adapting them to better fit the child.
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teachernyc teachernyc is offline
 
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Pushing In
Old 10-08-2009, 06:54 AM
 
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Thank you for your response, Laura. The problem I'm having is that I am, at times, pushing in during snack time or centers and the K rooms can be so rowdy that it is difficult to pull my ELLs aside and keep their attention. It's easier with my advanced students when I can support the students at their level with what the teacher is teaching, but my principal wishes to have me teaching a minilesson (workshop model) with my ELLs when I push-in which can be very difficult in a bust and already crowded classroom!
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louzzianna louzzianna is offline
 
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Use their classmates as a resource
Old 10-29-2009, 08:19 PM
 
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Use their classmates as a resource. For instance sight words, number symbols and number words relationships are things that you can show a student already proficient in the skills, how to drill their ELL peers. When you pull your students aside, invite students who are "early finishers" and "mother hens" to join in. Many times they want the extra attention a "push in" teacher gives to students with special needs. Regular Ed. students are often feeling neglected. You can teach them procedures to help their ELL classmates acquire vocabulary, learn numbers, colors, items around the room, how to say "may I go to the restroom", they can do read alouds, etc. I have found that children love to be teacher's helper and when you aren't even there, the teaching continues. Early finishers won't be bored and waiting for what's next, and they can communicate with ELL students sometimes better than the teacher. Give them guidelines and simple methods like say-spell-say with sight words, counting manipulatives out loud and having your ELL students parrot what they say, read around the room, etc. Another benefit is that the students build relationships with each other and get to really know someone that is culturally different from themselves. Snack time is even a vocabulary, counting, learning opportunity! Your helpers might even learn a second language.
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teaching the ESL program to K-2
Old 11-14-2009, 06:08 AM
 
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This is my second year of teaching ESL students in grades K-2. My recommendations for making your program work and to be respected among your colleagues.

First, do not allow your colleagues where you do inclusion to treat you as an assistant. You ARE a licensed teacher and deserved to be treated as such. If they begin to treat you like an assistant, get together with your teachers after school to discuss what both of your roles should be. I do this.

Secondly, attend teacher grade-level planning meetings. I have found that this one thing has greatly improved my respectability as a professional this year. I was part-time in my school last year and went to another school part-time, so I was not able to attend those meetings last year. Since I am now full-time in my school, I make a point of attending the meetings. I even have it blocked into my schedule to attend. Attending the meetings gives you a wealth of information about what is being taught and how it is being taught. It also helps you see the "big picture"--the unit plans, etc.

When I am in the kindergarten classes for inclusion, I typically stand at the front of the room with the teacher, ready to "jump in" and add to what the teacher says. In this way, I am not just a person sitting around watching the teacher teaching. While the teacher is presenting the guided practice, I am moving around checking their work to be sure they are doing the right thing. When it's independent practice time, I call them to the table to work with me until I'm sure they've got it. I work with K in math, reading, and writing. Basically, my plan is the same for first and second grade, also.

I also have three groups a day that I pull. Our grade levels separate the children into groups according to their skill levels, and we switch kids among the grade levels. I always get my ESL students in my group. Currently, I'm teaching fluency and decoding to my children in second grade who need it the most. The others are practicing comprehension skills in their groups since they've already mastered fluency and decoding.


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