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readingirl readingirl is offline
 
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title 1 reading/reading specialists
Old 10-05-2009, 12:37 PM
 
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I was wondering what other title 1 reading teachers and reading specialists are doing in their pull-out lessons.

I am currently seeing pull-out groups and trying to follow the theme, story, and skills the classroom teachers are covering in their classrooms. I'm struggling with this because I know some of my kids are not keeping up even with the modified format I'm using in addition to what they are learning in the regular classroom. They seem to need more structured and repetitive lessons. I'm especially worried about my 5th- 6th graders. I'm thinking about working on introducing one strategy (predict, question, connect, visualize, clarify, and summarize) at a time by using lit sets and some stories that accompany the series our district uses and not worrying about the classroom time-line. My worry is will they be ready when district testing comes around or will they be better prepared because we have taken the time needed and focused on the necessary skills. I work with 1st-6th so I would like to hear from all grades.

What do you think? What do your pull-out lessons look like? What has worked for you?

TIA


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Not the expert ...
Old 10-05-2009, 04:38 PM
 
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but I am certainly more than willing to share. How successful I am...not sure...but I feel pretty good most days.

I also work from what the students are doing in their homerooms...same vocab, same skills...but this is all that is the same. You are right when you say they need so much more repetition, so that is why I use the same vocab and skills. Of course, my activities are different, but I am with you in thinking it helps them perform better in their classes. This is helpful to their self esteem, which you know many struggle with as well as their litercy skills. I try to make what we do short and sweet and in a game/oral fashion....task cards with short paragraphs on them on inference, context clues, etc and when they get the right answer, they can make a wadded up piece of paper into a plastic basket, etc. Or the same type of card/answer and they move around a board game. Practice, but nothing they have to do to keep up with or in addition to...just practice that builds them up. I only assess these skills periodically and on a very short worksheet. They get enough paper/pencil stuff they can't keep up with.

But I also look at the students' state test results and try to pinpoint areas that they were low in and the NWMAP test results which give more literacy skill deficiencies. Many time these skills are the same so I don't feel like I am 'missing' teaching what they need for the district testing. The comprehension skills are more difficult to be sure they 'get' over and over again. I try to do as much modeling in 'mini' spots as I can and whenever I read a picture book to them. ( I also work with upper levels...grade 3, 4, and 5.)

I know the person I took over for in title reading did her 'own' thing and the teachers...me included...always felt like she wasn't doing anything. The kids didn't perform in the classroom. So I know that the teachers seem much more willing to send the kids. I also know my state requires me to work closely with the classroom teachers and try to address what they are doing in their rooms.

I hope this helps. It is a real struggle, isn't it? I want to go watch everyone else in the state and see how and what they do. It is so different than the regular ed classroom, isn't it?

I am hoping that what I am doing is making a difference. I guess it is important to keep in mind that you alone aren't responsible for their entire testing outcome...
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Pull Out
Old 10-06-2009, 02:55 AM
 
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This year is my first year back to work after a 4 year absence with my kiddos. I had been in the classroom, and this is a struggle for me, because I send them back thinking, are they going to continue to get this, I just want to keep them...

Any way, I work with K-5. I am doing the same skill as they are in the classroom, but modified and repetitive. For example, in K I am introducing the same letters, but about 3-4 days beheind the classroom teacher. In 1st I am teaching the phonics skill, comprehension skill etc, but I am using leveled books and doing more sight word things. Still working things out, but just trying to reinforce and repeat skills. The upper grades are based on skill as well as state and benchmark tests, but they are the ones that are really lacking on comprehension skills, so I have been pushing those skills a lot. There fluency, decoding etc, is not that bad, but they do not monitor themselves as they read and then are not remembering the story.

Uphill struggle, but we are working on it...
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LaVerne LaVerne is offline
 
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comprehension
Old 10-06-2009, 04:51 AM
 
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I agree about the comprehension piece. I am looking for short, quick ways to address this...anybody willing to share something that works for them? I model, model, model,....underline on chart paper...but boy, it just doesn't seem to stick. Recently, I have started stopping at the end of each sentence and asking them what they have read. This feels like pulling taffy. Anyone???? THANKS VERY MUCH!
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Thank you
Old 10-08-2009, 03:56 PM
 
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Thank you for the replies... I struggle with knowing if I'm doing the right thing in my classroom. I think it is mostly because I am the only Reading Specialist in my building and in my district the Reading Specialists do not have many opportunities to meet and share ideas. So I feel I am plugging away not knowing if I'm using the best instructional strategies. I absolutely love to check in to see what you all are doing!

Some things I do to improve comprehension... stop often with the upper grades to discuss what they are reading. I do a lot of think alouds as I'm demonstrating fluent reading. When reading together we either read aloud and discuss after about a page from a book or I have them read a paragraph silently then discuss. I have them do some written responding to the story at times as well. As far as something that the kids really enjoy that focuses on comprehension, I have purchased a game called "Keys to Comprehension". I actually get cheers from the kids when I tell them we are going to play this game. The motivation to read is high with this game.....Something I enjoy seeing!!!


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Game
Old 10-09-2009, 05:31 PM
 
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Can you tell me more about the KEYS TO COMPREHENSION game? Board game, computer game? Where did you buy it? Cost?
Thanks!
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games/activities
Old 10-13-2009, 11:55 AM
 
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The Keys to Comprehension game is through Remedia Publications. It is a board game with short passages and questions covering inferencing, sequencing, drawing conclusions, using context to determine missing word, finding facts, and main ideas. I purchased it for my classroom a few years ago so I can't recall the cost. It does come in two levels. I use the lower level with my second and third graders. I usually have my second graders work in pairs at the beginning of the school year to read and answer the question. The best thing about it is everyone is usually reading a passage and answering a question, not often are they just waiting their turn. The worst thing, I have used the game often enough students are starting to see some of the same passages/questions.

Another student favorite which I've been using since the beginning of the school year is "I have.., Who has.." language cards. Purchased the reproducible books from Creative Teaching Press. I've reproduced some of the cards for skills we've covered already for example base words and contractions. This is a quick review and everyone is involved.
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Old 11-17-2009, 06:54 AM
 
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hey gurl good job
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Explicit Think Alouds
Old 11-20-2009, 07:28 PM
 
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In my district, we have spent 3 years studying think alouds.
We have worked really hard on having meaningful student applications.
In my Title I room, I model a specific think aloud strategy and initially,
I may not have a student app. As the days progress, I still begin the lesson
with my think aloud, but the student application starts to become the focus of the
lesson. I work through the Fisher & Frey gradual release of responsibility model:
focus lesson, guided practice, collaboration, independent practice. Everyday,
I model the think aloud at the beginning and somedays, it's really short because then
we go into the collab. piece or the guided practice.

I think that explicit think alouds (the Reading First model) work really well, but
you have to let the kids get wet and try things out too.

This is extremely brief and if you would like more info, let me know.
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LisatheReader LisatheReader is offline
 
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Pull-out classes
Old 12-14-2009, 03:57 PM
 
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I understand your predicament. I gave the Basic Reading Inventory at the beginning of the school year to prospective students. Based on what the BRI showed, I grouped my students based on reading level and weakness in reading--phonics or comprehension.
I began teaching my students where they are, regardless to what the classroom teacher is covering. (Currently, I have grades 3-5)

I know this is a late reply, but I just signed up. I hope this helps!

LisatheReader


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