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Opinions on Push-in Enrichment
Old 12-27-2010, 08:51 AM
 
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Our district is utilizing a new format for gifted programming in which gifted students stay in the regular education setting. The gifted teacher pushes in and collaborates with the regular education teacher to enrich all of the students across different ability levels (special ed, remedial, regular ed, and gifted).

Gifted students are differentiated/tiered to a more stringent criteria. Gifted students with GIEPs are taking part in 5 pre-made projects as their mode of gifted enrichment, along with their peers of varying abilities. The projects integrate science, math, literature, and social studies and are structured around the grade curriculum. Gifted students can choose the direction (science, math, literature, social studies) they want to take within the project.

I don't want to share my own opinion, because I am looking for other gifted teachers' perspectives on this mode of delivering enrichment to gifted students. I am also looking for perspective on ways to improve and maximize the effectiveness of this mode of gifted programming.


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Least effective
Old 12-30-2010, 09:29 AM
 
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is my own personal opinion. I've been teaching gifted students for 17 years, and I think the best option for the student is a self-contained classroom with other gifted students. That way they are not held back due to the pace of the regular classroom. This is how I started in gifted ed. Our current program is a weekly pullout program, with students clustered in a regular classroom the other four days with a teacher who has had GT training, and is supposed to be differentiating for the students in the classroom; however, as is often the case in mixed abilities classrooms, the student above grade level is not the one anyone is concerned about. As one teacher told me when I mentioned you could take that ten mins after you've finished a whole class lesson and do some differentiation with the GT kids, "if I have ten minutes to work with a student, it's not going to be the GT students, it's going to be the ones who are in danger of not passing TAKS."

I think "push in" (where did that term come from I have never heard it anywhere but here.. ) would be the least effective. When are these students going to have time to collaborate with intellectual peers? Are they going to be clustered in one class at each grade level? And even then, we've had issues of only one student on a campus in a grade level, and if not for the weekly pullout (ours bus from five campuses for a magnet type program), he would have never had any peers to work with.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:41 PM
 
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I SO agree with Yesteach!
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could be a good option
Old 01-01-2011, 12:53 PM
 
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First of all, in a very small district (only two classrooms per grade level for the ENTIRE district where I work), a push-in program (I've heard this term used in several parts of the country) may be the only option for any type of gifted programming.
As far as effectiveness, I think the ideal environment for highly gifted students is a self-contained gifted program so students can interact with their intellectual peers. I also think this type of program can integrate some type of social/emotional curriculum to meet the needs of many gifted students.
However, that does not mean that a push-in program would not be effective. With this type of program, I would push for clustering in grade-level classrooms where teachers WANT to work with gifted students and co-teach. I have not co-taught as or with a gifted education specialist, but I have co-taught with SPED and ELL teachers. Some of those co-teaching situations have been fruitful and some have not. The best ones occurred when BOTH teachers truly wanted to teach (not just act as a glorified teacher's assistant) and had time to collaborate and really create units and lessons that would benefit all students. The times I've had an opportunity to engage in an effective co-teaching relationship have lessened my workload AND helped me more effectively reach students whose needs were outside of the grade-level curriculum.
Three easy formats to begin this kind of co-teaching structure would be:
  1. Set up stations for students to rotate through, with each teacher leading one.
  2. Each teacher take half of the class and teach a lesson; then switch.
  3. One teacher introduces the lesson and gives an assignment; the other teacher then pulls a small group for an extension/enrichment/remedial activity. -- It's best if the teacher introducing the lesson is not always the regular classroom teacher so that every student in the room views both teachers as teachers, not a teacher and an assistant.
When you plan together, if you can structure your lessons this way, it's a good place to start. As you become more comfortable teaching together, you can experiment with other formats for co-teaching.

As far as the projects, be sure that the gifted students share what they've done with all of their classmates. But I would also see if there's a way to have all the gifted students share their projects with each other, maybe getting together once a grading period (or once a month or whatever) to share what they've done.
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Good Luck
Old 01-06-2011, 12:27 PM
 
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Sounds like an awful lot of work on your part. I am afraid you will spend more time with the Re. Ed and SPED kids than with the G&T ones.


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agree!!!!
Old 01-13-2011, 07:28 PM
 
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I totally agree! Sometimes push in programs become a "more of the same" approach for our gifted kids! I cringed when I read this post and its threads. The gifted teacher in me says "Boo, hiss! to push-in" :-)
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Old 05-24-2011, 12:04 PM
 
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I am, after 10 years of teaching and perfecting what I do in gifted LA small groups, being told, on the last days of school mind you, that I will have to do "push-in" for my gifted. I am told that I will have to push in with three different LA teachers, so no one "figures out which team has the gifted kids." I am nervous to say the least. Every part of me thinks this is a bad idea, but I am ready to try! Any one who has any advice please let me know!
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Old 03-20-2017, 09:36 AM
 
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I see push-in as a fail! Inclusion all over again, and as I learned in my post-graduate work, "Inclusion causes Confusion". The social emotional aspects of gifted students leans toward them spending time with "like" peers. My students like a safe place to fail in our gifted program. They do not like the other students saying "aren't you gifted? You should know this", when they make a mistake.

Even in a perfect situation, with every teacher on board, I see this as a scheduling nightmare and impossible to balance.
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Push-In is not best practice for TAG students
Old 03-20-2017, 09:58 AM
 
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Push-In waters down the gited program and the identified gifted students do not like it. It is difficult to find teachers who are willing to obtain the training required to implement Push-In. This is going backwards in education!
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