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bison06 bison06 is offline
 
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Extreme behaviors
Old 10-13-2018, 07:57 AM
 
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Do you/have you had aggressive and violent students that have caused you to evacuate the others? On a regular basis?

I have a student that is violent all throughout the day. By the time admin can get there he has usually calmed down and so they just leave him in class... but I've been told I need a plan for Monday to end these behaviors.

I've evacuated the class on occassion, but I would like to have a more set procedure for when we will evacuate. Does anyone have any tips/guidelines? If I can get to him I've been restraining him instead of evacuating so that other students can continue to work... but I'm not actually restraint trained, so that's not the most wise decision but head of HR has told me of course I can stop a kid if they're hurting others. And when he's being restrained he's getting attention.

It's like a power thing, he likes to be in "control" of others. He tears up the work that they are working on, pushes them, throws crayons, etc. and it's really hard to train 5 year olds not to react.


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Old 10-13-2018, 08:36 AM
 
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I’m sorry that you are having to deal with this!

Recommendations:
+ desk by himself — up by your desk — or somewhere that you van supervise him closely.

+ Call parents in. See if they have seen these behaviors before. Ask about preschool — whatever prior placement that he had. Recommend a pediatrician visit to rule out medical issues (maybe...)

+ Behavior chart — include things like arrival to school, morning assembly, morning work, bathroom breakers — every part of your day. We just do smilie and frowny faces with a space for remarks. That might help to see what sets him off. And — it sounds like you might need documentation down the road. We take pics and message the parent every day with them.

+ If he can use his supplies properly - then you have to file them out as he needs them.

+ Don’t restrain unless you are trained. It can get you into trouble.

+ Get admin or counselor to come in and observe and have them document what they see in writing. Have them provide recommendations. If you are having to evacuate the class then you should bet getting more support than you are!

Good luck! I’m sure that others will have suggestions as well!!
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Old 10-13-2018, 11:24 AM
 
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In my district, restraint is the absolute last option, after all de-escalation techniques have been attempted and then only by someone with CPI certification. Any restraint other than that is a lawsuit/criminal charges. I would not do it, were I you. I don't know that HR has the authority to authorize this.


I have had three students who caused multiple evacuations daily. I had a code word that told my students to go to the playground. My aide would accompany them and alert my next door neighbor to come in to provide me a witness so I wasn't alone with that student until admin could haul butt up to my room.

Sending the rest of the class to an unscheduled recess removed the audience as well as the potential victims.

My P actually called the police on one of these students last year during my observation.


Kids like this are the absolute, most exhausting, anxiety-inducing parts of teaching. Be the squeaky wheel and get yourself support. My P became a 1:1 for one of these students for the 3 months it took to get him into an appropriate placement. That was lightning fast.

You have all the empathy I have. I know how hard this is.
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Old 10-13-2018, 12:03 PM
 
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Thank you all. I know you are right about restraint, I need to start evacuating first.

My AP told me to send my students with "work" to my teammates' classes - but my teammates did not sound excited about that idea, they have overflowing classes with their own behavior problems. So for now, I've been telling my students to go in the hall and practice hallway behavior... it usually doesn't take long for him to calm down after the class leaves. I usually stand at the doorway.

The AP has FINALLY started being supportive, but my P blames me. I talked to his teacher from last year for 20 minutes today, and it is not an isolated incident.... but that campus has ISS, so he was removed from her room on a regular basis. He moved last weekend, and we are waiting (and wishing and hoping) his new proof of address is out of our zone.
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Old 10-13-2018, 12:15 PM
 
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He moved last weekend, and we are waiting (and wishing and hoping) his new proof of address is out of our zone.

This was the resolution for 2 of my 3 kids like this. One, the mom broke parole and had to move back. The other just disappeared once the police were involved. Fingers crossed you are free.


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Old 10-13-2018, 06:38 PM
 
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I am so sorry. That is so absolutely exhausting and stress inducing, not only for you but your other kids as well.


The only thing I would add to the above, which I'm sure you're doing, is document everything. Not only the behavior but how much instructional time your students are losing because of having to evacuate. Also be sure to call admin every single time. I ended up getting a walkie talkie so I could get my ap no matter where on campus she was. Things happened a lot faster when admin was being interrupted multiple times per day.


Good luck! I hope the boundary thing works out in your favor.
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Old 10-14-2018, 08:18 AM
 
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I am so sorry that you and your students are having to go through this. I've been there and know how overwhelming and exhausting it can be.

I agree with the PPs-do not restrain unless you have had the CPI training. We've been told that we can "block"-put ourselves between the student and the other students to protect them from getting hurt, but do not restrain.

I would also not video-tape or take photos unless you have parent permission. If you invite parents in to observe, find a way for them to observe where they aren't interacting with the student and where the student is unaware that the parents are observing so the parents see the true picture.

One of my colleagues is experiencing the same scenario this year. The rest of our team has been trying to provide as much support as we can. She completed an I & RS referral. The process takes time, but that committee was able to fast-track the student for a CST referral. The student's behavior escalated to the point where he had slapped the teacher across the face twice, bit, scratched and kicked her. Her room was slowly getting emptied as she had to remove more and more items because he was destroying things.

The P finally hired a temporary one-on-one aide for that student last week. The student became aggressive with that aide, too. There were several mandatory parent pick ups and a suspension.

Last week the Director of Special Services happened to be in our building and witnessed it. The next day the student was put on home-bound instruction until a spot is available at an out of district placement-a school that works with students with mental health issues. Once he gets enrolled in that school, he will probably be there for at least 3-6 weeks, but it can be up to 6 months to get his behavior under control. Then he will return to our school. This is the quickest we've seen a child removed from our school-usually it takes a year of documenting and then they want to see how the student does the first months of the following year...

It is a sad situation for everyone. First, it is sad for the student exhibiting the behavior because he is obviously in need of help and needs more support than the current setting can provide.

Second, it is sad for the other students in the class because school should be a safe place for them and instead it is stressful and traumatizing to be in that situation.

Third, it is sad for the teacher. It is so overwhelming, along with being both physically and emotionally draining. The teacher is on constant alert trying to anticipate behavior/prevent things from escalating and protect the other students-all while attempting to teach and create a warm, welcoming safe environment for the students.

In the meantime, be the squeaky wheel. We are fortunate that we all have walkie-talkies so we can radio for help. If you have a system like that in place, don't be afraid to use it and use it often. Sometimes it takes the administration being inconvenienced to get the ball rolling faster. (Sometimes it helps if parents start complaining. I wouldn't call parents up and ask them to complain; however, if a parent says something about it, your response can be "Administration is aware of the situation and working on it. Please feel free to share your concerns with them." One year I had a parent tell me after the fact that she hadn't said anything because she didn't want to get me in trouble.I explained to her that it wouldn't get me in trouble because I was doing everything I was supposed to do and more.)

Document as much as you can. Can you use an ABC (antecedent/behavior/consequence/duration) chart to help you identify triggers, determine if the consequences are working and document how long the behavior lasts? This documentation will show all the things that you tried.

I arrange for the student to not be in the classroom when I have a discussion with the rest of the class. I do not mention the student. I talk in general terms. i.e. Have you ever had anyone call you a name? How did it feel? What did you do? We talk about not giving away their power. When we react to what others say and do, then we give away our power.

We role-play different scenarios. i.e. I tell my students that I am wearing my favorite shirt. Then I have one of the students tell me that my shirt is ugly. I pretend to cry. The student flexes muscles and says "Yay! I have the power to control her." I have him/her continue with comments "Your hair is ugly." I cry louder. Then we repeat the scenarios where I don't react, I walk away. I say "What you said is not nice." and I walk away. I tell a grown up. The student acts frustrated because he/she can't control me. We practice doing the following-ignore, walk away, move to a different spot, use your words, tell a grown up... We discuss how what was said was hurtful. When I reacted, the student kept doing it. When I didn't react, it stopped being fun for the other student to do it. I remind students by saying "Keep your power."

Work with the student to create a quiet spot where he/she can go. Provide soft toys, calming music...Allow the student to choose what is in his quiet space. Discuss and practice how to use the quiet space. Discuss what happens if he misuses the items. If he throws items, then when he is calm, he has to pick up everything. You might even "I am sorry that you chose to throw the stuffed animal. Remember that we agreed if you throw things, then I have to remove them from the quiet space." Then remove the item.

Next give the student strategies to use. i.e. Read the book, Shubert Is a S.T.A.R. to the student and practice draining, ballooning and being a S.T.A.R. Then read the book to the class and invite the student to model each strategy for the class. (Student is getting some attention that he desires, but it is positive-not negative.) Hang a poster with the strategies in his quiet space.

Because the student needs to feel in control, give the student choices you can live with. "You can sit on the carpet with us or sit on a chair at the table. Where are you going to sit?" "You can do the work now with us or do it during free-choice center time. When are you doing your work?"

Give the student 3 tickets. (You can decide how many tickets you want to allot.) The student turns in a ticket when he needs a break. When he turns in the ticket, he goes to an agreed upon spot for an agreed upon activity for 2 -3 minutes. The student has the choice of when to use the ticket.

If the student is hurting other students and can't keep his hands to himself, then he gets a desk and doesn't sit at the table. The student is not ostracized. The desk is at the end of the table. The desk gives the student a clearly defined space. If the student is writing with markers on the other students or on their work, then the student is not able to use markers. He has to show that he is responsible and respectful before he can use them.

I have a student this year in my gen ed K class. He was placed out of district for most of last year when he was in preschool due to his violent, aggressive behavior. He returned to our school this year. He spends 2/3 of the day with me and 1/3 of the day in the resource center. He has a one-on-one aide. I would not be able to manage without him having the one-on-one aide. He is using a token board which has been helpful, but I would not be able to give him the feedback he needs as frequent as he needs it. Because he has a one-on-one aide, we are able to provide the student with motor breaks and time in the sensory room.

Find out what the student likes to help him buy into what you are doing. i.e. We found out that he loves policemen and soldiers. So his quiet spot is a laundry basket decorated as a police car.

We have found it better to not engage the student when he is in a meltdown or rage. We stand by with blank faces and don't respond. Then when the student is calm, we can discuss what happened.

I know it is hard. Hang in there. Hopefully they will get the student the help he needs soon. You are in survival-mode right now. You need to take care of you. The stress can affect your health. I remember the one year I cried every day before going in my building because the situation was so bad. I truthfully didn't know if I could do it. I worried about the student and how the rest of my class wasn't getting the best of me. Do something for yourself. Easier said than done. (((Bison06)))

This is a horrible thought, but I want to spit on people when they say "It can't be that bad. Come on, you are talking about a five-year old." They obviously haven't witnessed the Tasmanian devil destroy a classroom or terrorize other five-year olds. A five-year old can flip tables when he is in a rage.
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Old 10-14-2018, 09:12 AM
 
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This is a horrible thought, but I want to spit on people when they say "It can't be that bad. Come on, you are talking about a five-year old." They obviously haven't witnessed the Tasmanian devil destroy a classroom or terrorize other five-year olds. A five-year old can flip tables when he is in a rage.

No kidding. One of mine sent my aide and another student to the hospital. Do not underestimate the power of rage.
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Old 10-14-2018, 04:52 PM
 
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Thank you for those ideas iteachk... I especially like teaching students how to keep their power.
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