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born2teachuga born2teachuga is offline
 
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Close Reading Lesson Plan
Old 03-24-2014, 08:25 AM
 
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Hey! I'm trying to do my first close reading lesson plan for an evaluation I have coming up and I'm stuck on ideas as to what to do. It's for a 4th grade class. I was thinking of using the song "Roar" by Katy Perry, but I'm torn with how I should handle the different readings. I know I can do figurative language but I can also do theme/purpose as well. What suggestions do you have for how I can tweak this lesson so that it flows? I'm not concrete in all of the activities just yet 100%. I think it's spring that has my mind all jumbled.


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File Type: docx Close Reading.docx (13.3 KB, 223 views)
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Close reading
Old 03-24-2014, 03:50 PM
 
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I don't want to burst your bubble, but if this is your first close reading lesson, it is not something I would try for the first time as an observation lesson. Students need to be taught what close reading is and how to do it and it must start with teacher modeling of the 3 parts of a close reading lesson.

The workshops and trainings I've been to (I've been to a lot in the last three years.) recommend that close reading strategies be done with short, rigorous text in a shared reading situation over a 3 day period, with the teacher modeling first then gradual release to the students.

You don't start close reading with listening to a song, that is not close reading, maybe close listening. Also, close reading is about proving things from the text, so I am unsure where creating visuals come in in a close read.

You would start with a copy of the written lyrics and you want to do your first lessons in close reading whole group. That is one of the points of close reading, to bring in those lower students who need support to the whole group experience.

I'm going to cut and paste a previous post here for you:

"Close reading" is investigating what is exactly said in a text. It places the onus of text comprehension squarely on the reader pulling exactly "the what" and "the how" of what the writer is attempting to convey without considering any personal interpretations/connections from the reader and with very little (to no) development of all the pre-reading activities that we have been use to doing, such as vocabulary development, building background info, predicting, making connections, etc.

On a first read, we read and annotate for the main ideas, now called the central ideas in the standards, with our questions strictly limited to the big ideas and puzzling out any confusions that arise while we read. This is all in standards 1-3.
What is the author saying? Prove it with evidence from the text.

On a second read, standards 4-6, we analyze the text. Interpret the language, structure, and point of view and how these shape the text. Why did the author made certain choices and how did those choices affect mood, tone, etc.? How is the author saying this? (author's craft) Prove it with evidence from the text. What strategies did the author use to make her point? (text structure) Prove it with evidence from the text.

Only after this work, is done, is one to agree/disagree with what they have read, add in or compare it to background info, find other sources and compare different viewpoints, etc.

So, on a third read, we do a critical analysis. What is the quality/value of the text? How does this text connect to other texts? Prove it with evidence from the text.

It gets more complicated than that, of course, I just tried to kind of outline the process.

An outline of sorts:

During a "close reading" lesson on the first day, we read and annotate just to get the idea of the piece, annotating places where we are confused, don't understand, don't know the vocabulary, etc.

The second day, we tackled the tough places noted on the 1st read, look for central ideas, look at the structure of the piece, etc.

The third day we work on the author's craft, the author's arguments and supporting statements and then evaluating what we thought of the piece.
(this is where figurative language can come in, or perhaps on the second read if there is time-depends on how you want to structure the lesson)

Now, all this being said, you could still flesh out your lesson as it is for students to identify figurative language and determine central ideas of a piece, but it is not a "close reading" lesson.

Hope this helps.
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Here's a poster, if you like...
Old 03-25-2014, 02:55 AM
 
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This is something I made for my class when we do close reading.

That said, close reading cops may want to x-out of this this one, it may not be "pure" close reading ~ but I think it helps to accomplish what close reading is all about. And when the kids use this ~ OMG! I just love it! Best part of my day.

Let me just quickly explain the what this poster only briefly illustrates:

C
Circle the title and make any comments you like.
L
Label the paragraphs, numbering them.
O
Organize the paragraphs, using brackets to connect those paragraphs that seem to be related, for whatever reason has meaning for the student.
S
Summarize the text by writing five important words from the text in the margin.
E
Explain and Express (Couldn't think of better "e words."). Put a smiley face by things you like, put a frowney face by things you don't like, put a question mark by things you don't understand...

I don't grade for these ~ except occasionally for effort. I usually use this when they are reading with partners ~ the discussions that they will have with their partners to decide how to do this are unbelievable.

Anyone who has doubts, confusion, cynicism, criticism, or dislike for CLOSE reading should witness this and, I would think, all of the attitudes would disappear.

If you try this, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Good luck,
CLOSE Reading Nut pg
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Annotating Close Reading
Old 03-25-2014, 06:53 AM
 
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I agree with pg.

Annotating a close read is part of the process and it is phenominal. It puts the students focus right into the text and in my experience the students "like" annotating and they are engaged... believe it or not.

The only problem with annotating the text comes when the students are tested by computers. Our end of grade testing is all done on computers and other than highlighting, there is no way for students to annotate the text.
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Parker and pg-a few questions
Old 03-25-2014, 01:40 PM
 
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How did you learn about this? Is it CC?

How would one get started? Do you do it whole group (always?)?
In reading groups?

How often? Daily?

Do you ever read real books in small groups or is it always worksheet type reading? (I ask this because I have a new teammate who only does worksheet type reading passages during small groups. That goes against my belief that children should be reading authentic text). He came from a strong CC state.

If either of you could outline your reading block so I can envision how this is used, I would appreciate it. I would like my students more engaged in the text, whether it be 'test prep' (worksheets) text or authentic text (books, magazines, etc.).

TIA!


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More close reading
Old 03-25-2014, 04:36 PM
 
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I have taught for a very long time, 37 years, close reading as it is called now, was a strategy I learned in my undergrad English college classes all those years back, but it wasn't called that then. I didn't make the connection until I got on the internet, read some articles, looked at some examples and watched some videos of close reading lessons. I had a short training at our school on it, too.

Yes, CC wants students to do close reading. Not all the time, but sometimes.

I always use CR as a whole group activity, the text is meant to be a cold read. Some teachers may do it as a shared reading, but I donít, it is supposed to be a cold read done individually and silently by students. CR is done with grade level or even a little higher lexile reading, it is supposed to be difficult so all students have some "work" to do. CR is supposed to be done with rigorous, short text, so no, we don't close read whole books or novels, but you can use portions of these kinds of texts. I use non-fiction articles, speeches, poems, etc. printed out so students can annotate directly on the text.

I teach 5th. I model the first lesson with the poem/ballad Casey at the Bat, what is more authentic than that? (For my modeling lesson I do a shared reading.) It is not worksheet reading. I've also use it with Tyger, by William Blake, you know Tiger, Tiger burning brightÖthat poem. It was tough, a real challenge to the students, but they got it! Lots of strange vocab. and use of language for them to figure out. Iíve also used Frostís Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening as a cold read. Fables are a good way to start if students are younger. They are very short and always have a moral that students can write about.

We don't close read everything or do it every day; I try to spend 3 days doing a close read of something every 2-3 weeks. It does/should not take the whole reading time each day, maybe 15-20 min each day of the 3 day process. I always do it in 3 days, if you try to do all 3 reads in a one day lesson with elementary kids, you will lose them.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:51 AM
 
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Parker-

Thanks! Your explanation helps. I think I'll try implementing it the last 2 months of school.
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Thanks to all who contributed their thoughts!
Old 03-29-2014, 04:55 PM
 
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Thanks for starting this thread, born2teachuga. We're just starting with this, too! I've only had ONE training way back in the summer when it was just a small part introducing us to whole switch to Common Core Reading and Math.
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wow
Old 04-04-2014, 06:53 AM
 
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Parker, thanks for a great explanation. pg, I like your poster.

When our Curriculum Director wanted to demo close reading, she had some of us do this lesson:
https://www.urbancollaborative.org/f...uts_washoe.pdf

It might help you.

I wound up teaching it twice, once to 5th and once to 6th. There were things I liked and some I didn't, but the kids loved it and came up with some great ideas.
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Pd
Old 04-07-2014, 01:42 AM
 
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We had a PD on this and I had NO clue what they were talking about. Please tell me I'm not the only one. The explanations given here made me connect CLOSE READING to a skill I have taught for a few years using the term UNRAVEL. Thank you for explaining it so well and giving out resources that actually help. I think this would be great to use with passages from readworks.org.


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Close Reading
Old 04-21-2014, 07:56 PM
 
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Thanks for all of the expertise shared here! I appreciate it!
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