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artladyhere artladyhere is offline
 
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Student Teachers
Old 03-26-2018, 05:51 PM
 
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Have you subbed with many student teachers this year?


I have only once...she was a 57 yr old woman (<---unusual to see but so cool to hear her story of why she went back to school) and it ended up being a fun experience, but I felt sooo useless and that just makes the day drag on.


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Old 03-27-2018, 08:53 PM
 
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No student teachers but I did have 3 students on day from a university doing field observations.
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Old 03-28-2018, 08:53 AM
 
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Yes, and they do all the work, so it is a boring/easy day.
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Old 03-28-2018, 08:55 AM
 
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I wonder if, when you sub with student teachers, if it would be appropriate to ask if there are students who need additional assistance or if there is a small group you could work more closely with? Then you both can be gainfully employed?
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yes...and it's never easy
Old 03-28-2018, 11:05 AM
 
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I've had several encounters with student teachers, and it's never easy for either one of us. I frankly feel sorry for student teachers because they fall into a grey area where they are not paid, not district employees, so they are not even given a roster or classroom key, and in the regular teacher's absence, a substitute teacher has to be in the classroom with them. They are being trained to be teachers, but they are operating in a "no man's land" of ambiguity.

Virtually all of my experiences have been situations where I was given no forewarning that there would be a student teacher present, and the teacher's lesson plan (if there was one) didn't mention the student teacher or her role. I was given the classroom key and roster, and the office secretary would casually mention that there would be a student teacher. Then it was my job to sort out our respective roles with the student teacher. I take the lead because the student teachers I've encountered lack the experience to negotiate these kinds of situations. I generally conduct the class myself while the student teacher works with small groups or helps individual students.

The other day, however, I had just arrived at an elementary school when the principal came out and asked me to allocate a segment of the 2nd grade class instruction to a student teacher who was "trying out" different grade levels that day (she had been teaching 4th only). After reviewing the lesson plan, I did as he asked and chose a segment for the student teacher. But when I spoke with the student teacher, she became angry and insisted that the principal had told her that she would be teaching the class the entire day. She went back to the principal to complain but apparently was corrected. That started things off on the wrong foot.

She ended up teaching the language arts segment that I had reserved for her, but she was in a bitter mood. She hadn't had time to prepare (not her fault). Even worse, she clearly didn't know how to work with younger students (she was severe, punitive, intimidating, and overwhelmed them with too much material). During this time, I was "hands off" and just floated around to help individual students.

Shortly after the student teacher started instruction, things started to unravel. The students got confused, bored, and restless and started talking among themselves. The student teacher became agitated and started yelling at them (which made matters worse). Several children began complaining to me of headaches and stomach aches and asked to go to the nurse ( lunch time was fast approaching, so I suggested they put their heads down and rest a bit). Since these kids had been fine before she took charge, it was obvious that they just felt uncomfortable with the teacher ( as she also felt with them). Fortunately, after lunch, the student teacher left, and I was able to resume charge of the class . Things got back to normal. (Miraculously, there were no more headaches or stomach aches either.)

Although I think the student teacher could have used an attitude adjustment (not to mention better classroom mgmt. skills), I also understand how awkward this was for us both (and for the 2nd grade students). We were both blindsided by the demands of a principal who (by his own admission) was scrambling at the last minute, on the last day before spring break, to fill in the student teacher's hours. I'm sure that's not a day any of us cares to repeat. Ugh.



Last edited by luv2teach2017; 03-29-2018 at 08:54 AM..
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It's OK, deal with it
Old 04-01-2018, 05:39 PM
 
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In 21-years of subbing, I've subbed with student teachers a few times. Most, if not all, experiences have been good. I expect to basically help out a bit or teach a particular lesson, but the ST usually runs the class and I let them handle it. Just deal with it, do your job, and leave.
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Not all the same
Old 04-02-2018, 11:07 AM
 
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Please keep in mind that some of us experience very different work environments than others. So generalizations don't necessarily apply.
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Old 04-02-2018, 12:08 PM
 
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I have subbed with many student teachers and have had the best experiences when the regular classroom teacher clearly communicates her expectations of me. I have a hard time sitting still and will wander the classroom making sure students are on task. Some student teachers find this helpful, some not so much. I make it a point to ask the student teacher first thing how she would like me to help. Some get huffy, some are grateful. I just roll with it.
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student teachers
Old 04-03-2018, 03:51 PM
 
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I have two colleges close to the districts where I sub and some of the schools take a lot of student teachers. I have observed the full range of student teachers. Some are really bad and I can't imagine them ever being hired. I have been with one HS English student teacher this year who is much better than his cooperating teacher.

It usually is a boring day but it is interesting to observe their approaches.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:28 AM
 
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I was a student teacher very recently. I always joked that the sub should pay me as I always did the work that day. I usually took all the classes since I wanted the experience. Now I ask the student what they want to do, but they usually want all or most of the classes. I usually just sit there, and only intervene if a student is really not responding to them. They have to learn to control a class for themselves, but I have seen some people get eaten alive at tough schools and I feel really bad for them. If you have had a difficult time with them, remember they are overworked, going to classes at school and generally really stressed out.


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related thread
Old 04-16-2018, 02:31 AM
 
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http://www.proteacher.net/discussion...d.php?t=228450
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inexperienced, overworked, unpaid, stressed
Old 04-16-2018, 08:46 AM
 
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You are so right, Fractured. I really feel for student teachers. And yes, they are always overworked and stressed. The problem for me as a sub is that the district I work for puts the responsibility on me as the "teacher in charge" for that day, so I'm the one held accountable if something goes wrong. I take that seriously.

A big complaint I've heard is that many subs take a passive role and leave it to the student teacher to do everything. It's never a neat and tidy arrangement for either of us. I always start out by talking it over with the student teacher to sort out our respective roles. But leaving the entire responsibility to the student teacher, from my experience, is a mistake.

The last time I tried to let the student teacher make the decisions, she didn't handle it well. She complained constantly about being unpaid and overworked and resented the fact that the class teacher had taken time off and not prepared lesson plans.

She didn't have or create a lesson plan of her own. On top of that, she had poor classroom management skills. (She didn't keep check on the 1st graders, and they ran amok.) She also tried to wing it by dragging things out and wasting time (which caused the kids to get even more bored and disruptive). She had poor team work skills as well. I had to ask her to sketch out a schedule for me. She asked me to teach math, but then she kept interfering and changing the plan as I was trying to teach. She attempted to teach a language arts lesson on the fly, but the kids were bored and inattentive. She asked me for suggestions, and I gave her one, which she used. (It worked beautifully, but she didn't bother to thank me. )

I was asked if I was available to return for a third day, but after two days of that, I'd had enough and opted out. I don't blame the student teacher so much as I blame the regular teacher for not providing lesson plans (she would have been required to if there'd been only a sub).

The student teacher was a single mom trying to attend classes and teach classes full time without pay. It's no wonder she was stressed and overwhelmed. I did what I could to help with classroom management without being overbearing, but the student teacher wanted to do most of the teaching, so I stepped back even though she was constantly complaining and doing a poor job. If she'd asked for suggestions or feedback, I'd have gladly given it. But she didn't, so neither did I.

As I said before, it's a messy arrangement, no matter how you approach it. I enjoy observing skilled teachers at work, but when I'm "officially" held responsible for the class, it's difficult to just sit by and watch an unskilled, inexperienced student teacher floundering.
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