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Raynaud's disease
Old 12-26-2013, 07:24 PM
  #1

Has anyone dealt with this? I'm visiting my parents and from symptoms my mom is having, I'm pretty sure that's what she has. She says the doctor has mentioned it as a diagnosis and that she may need to start medication if it continues. Today she was freezing while we were out shopping (temps were in the low 50's outside, so not that cold) and her nose turned blue. She says her fingertips also turn blue and she loses feeling in them, although I didn't see them change color today. Her hands were freezing though. I just wondered if anyone might have some tips that could help her...TIA!


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Old 12-26-2013, 07:27 PM
  #2

I have a friend who has it and she keeps a hairdryer handy and blows it on her hands and feet after being out in the cold. She also wears layers of socks/clothing.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:38 PM
  #3

My friend who has it does the hairdryer thing too. Once in the winter she was over at my house and borrowed mine after playing in the snow. She dresses in layers and sheds/adds layers as needed. She is constantly cold and her fingers, toes and nose turn purple from time to time. She is on a lot of medication, but those are for a chronic disease she picked up while overseas on the mission field (I forget the name of it) that causes her to be in a lot of pain all the time.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:51 PM
  #4

I had a student with it. We had hand warmers in the room. I had a blanket in my emergency backpack for fire drills.
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Raynaud's disease
Old 12-26-2013, 07:57 PM
  #5

We have a student who has that. She has to have gloves in her backpack to help her warm up. She can also run her hands under warm water.


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Old 12-26-2013, 08:00 PM
  #6

I have a student with that. She would sit on her hands when they were cold. Sometimes she carried a fleece blanket.
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I have it.
Old 12-26-2013, 08:07 PM
  #7

Most of the women on my mother's side of the family have it. I once had to leave my family while on a walk in Richardson's grove in the middle of JUNE because the change in temperature due to the thickness of the trees did me in. Hmmm... I might have to try that hair dryer trick. I usually have to run hot tap water over my hands. I tend to wear several pairs of socks during the winter, and I live in the Bay Area!
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Here too
Old 12-26-2013, 08:43 PM
  #8

I just bought the goose down gloves from L L Bean. Pricey but they help. Those little handwarmer things are nice also.
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Dad has it
Old 12-27-2013, 04:38 AM
  #9

My dad has it. He developed it sometime after after age 65. He takes a pill in winter months for it and makes sure he's really dressed for the weather. It only affects his hands and feet. It doesn't seem to prevent him from doing stuff outside (now that he's on medication). It was a problem before that, since after he retired, he did a rural route mail delivery and constantly had his hands out the car window.
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Old 12-27-2013, 04:41 AM
  #10

Thanks for all the suggestions!


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2 SIL have it
Old 12-27-2013, 04:55 AM
  #11

They keep a large supply of those chemical hand warmers nearby. Also, gloves are necessary even if temps seem warm.

Best wishes to you and your mom.
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I have it.
Old 12-27-2013, 05:16 AM
  #12

I have it, but it's not too severe. What's particularly strange is when I get into a warm shower after being outside in the cold temperatures... my fingers become almost transparent, and numb... making holding the soap tricky. Also, when I come in from the cold my fingers will often go numb. I've spoken to my doctor a little about this, and there isn't really a need for medication at this point.
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DH has it
Old 12-27-2013, 05:38 AM
  #13

but it only seems to affect 1 finger. He just soaks it in hot water for a minute or two and then is good to go. He tried the medication route but because he already suffers from low blood pressure the meds made him feel faint and dizzy all the time, so he stopped taking them. It obviously isn't that bad as it only happens 1 a month or so and we live in the Toronto area and spend an awful lot of time in arenas with our kids sporting events.
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niacin
Old 12-27-2013, 05:46 AM
  #14

Sorry your mom is dealing with this.

I am affected by this when temps drop below freezing. I also have to make sure my feet and fingers are protected, even indoors!

My doctor said to take a niacin tablet a day when temps drop below freezing-for me. They sell it over the counter at the drug store in the vitamin section (grocery stores, too) for under $10 a bottle. This worked for me without having to go on prescription meds-that would cost a lot more!

It relaxes the tiny blood vessels, so the blood flow can get to the toes and finger tips. It does make some people flush red/itch a bit for about 3-5 mins-says it on the bottle. It does that to my back and chest area-IF I TAKE IT ON AN EMPTY STOMACH, so I make sure I've eaten something-nothing happens if I do this! (startled me the first time that happened! )

It really worked for me to ease the symptoms!

google niacin and raynauds syndrome-might give you some info on it,if you wish.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:14 AM
  #15

I had this problem in my 20's, but hadn't thought of it in years. Maybe my taking vitamins all the time has made a difference.

I used to have trouble trying to get cold meat/frozen food at the grocery store. I was working in a lab at the time and had to dissect organs in a cold room (a walk in refrigerator). It was really hard. I'd end up cutting myself and couldn't feel it!

Consider the vitamins PP mentioned.
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dress warm
Old 12-27-2013, 06:33 AM
  #16

It effects my hands and feet at temps below 65 so I understand your mom being uncomfortable in the 50s. I don't take medication for it. As others have mention dress in layers and invest in a quality pair of gloves. I have a pair from Beans for the winter. They are expensive, but so worth it. I do have a lighter pair that I use in the spring and fall. I wear gloves for 3 seasons. Wool socks make a big difference too.
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