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Do Canadians say these words?
Old 06-25-2020, 08:36 PM
  #1

I watched a video on YouTube about what people from the U.S. and Canada call certain objects. For example, the guy from Canada said macaroni and cheese is often called KD or Kraft dinner in Canada. He said rubber bands can be called rubber bands but are more commonly called elastics. He referred to rain gutters as eavestroughs, and bathrobes as housecoats (or bathrobes.) If you're from Canada, do you commonly use any of these words?


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Old 06-25-2020, 08:38 PM
  #2

I live in Michigan and spend time in Ontario. I can confirm Kraft Dinner and elastics.
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Housecoat
Old 06-25-2020, 08:48 PM
  #3

Housecoat! Now thatís a word I havenít heard since childhood...in the Midwest...and a very non-Canadian household.
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:05 PM
  #4

I think of housecoat as midwestern too. I've heard rubber bands called elastics but not frequently and I've never heard of mac n cheese being called Kraft Dinner (even though I ate quite a few of those as a child )
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:11 PM
  #5

I've heard Kraft Dinner used in New England!


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Old 06-25-2020, 09:31 PM
  #6

I haven't eaten Kraft Dinner for at least 40 years, maybe longer but that's what I would call it if I ever had to eat it/

Man loves to use elastics, I hate the feel of them so throw them out whenever I come across them.

Yep, eavestroughs.

I might refer to it as a housecoat but I think of it as my dressing gown.
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From Philadelphia, PA
Old 06-25-2020, 10:34 PM
  #7

I have lived in the Philadelphia and surrounding area since birth, its housecoat for me.
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Old 06-26-2020, 02:16 AM
  #8

New Englander here and I have always called them elastics. My grandmother refered to a lightweight cotton short sleeved knee-length article that snapped up the front as as a housecoat. She had several of them . I think she wore them over her regular dress maybe when she was cleaning? This was in the 70s and 80s. Her background was French Canadian.
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Old 06-26-2020, 02:28 AM
  #9

I’m Canadian and the only word that I don’t use is housecoat! I actually still say Kraft Dinner, I think they changed the branding in Canada a while ago to KD. I would only say kraft dinner if I was eating Kraft dinner and not some other macaroni and cheese. I use both rubber band and elastic band interchangeably.
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Kd
Old 06-26-2020, 04:24 AM
  #10

It is branded as KD now, but I think most of us would still say Kraft Dinner lol. I miss the taste before they took out all the good chemicals to be honest...I would add shredded cheddar on the top. I used to say housecoat when I was younger, and say elastic.

It was first introduced under the Kraft Dinner name simultaneously in both Canada and the U.S. in 1937.


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Old 06-26-2020, 04:33 AM
  #11

As a Canadian:
It is absolutely KD or Kraft Dinner. Not that I have ever eaten it! Macaroni and cheese is homemade.

I use rubber band, elastic ot elastic band interchangeably.

It is definitely eavestrough.

I say bathrobe or robe more now but used housecoat as a kid.

I can think of a few others - pencil crayons, duotangs and Bristol board have come up here a time or 2!

https://www.slice.ca/breaktime/photo...oes-pogie-mean
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Old 06-26-2020, 05:17 AM
  #12

I live in Maine and elastics and housecoat is pretty common in my area. I live in an area that is known for its French Canadian influence.
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Old 06-26-2020, 05:25 AM
  #13

Iím Canadian and yes, I commonly use the words kraft dinner, elastics, eavestrough, and housecoat.
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Old 06-26-2020, 05:40 AM
  #14

Yes, though I haven’t used housecoat often since I was a kid. and what I’d consider a housecoat is a lighter weight robe with a zipper. A bathrobe has a tie around the waist. Also, Kraft dinner is the stuff in a box. Homemade is still macaroni and cheese.
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Old 06-26-2020, 07:36 AM
  #15

I'm from Michigan, not Canada, and say eavestroughs. When we moved to Portland, no one knew what I was talking about. "Gutters" sounds so, ecchhh.



I've seen British shows and read British books where they have used "elastics", but have never heard anyone I know say it.


When I was little we had a babysitter from Texas, and she said "housecoat", but it wasn't exactly what I could call a robe. It was woven cotten, buttoned up the from, and she wore it like a robe. No terry, no tie.



Never heard of Kraft Dinner. I appreciate the picture!
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Old 06-26-2020, 08:52 AM
  #16

not a canadian, but "eavestroughs" is hard to say!
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Old 06-26-2020, 09:17 AM
  #17

Southern New England here.

A bathrobe is what you put on over your pjs. A housecoat is for day wear around the house. It is worn over underwear. It may be buttoned or have a zipper. It is made of a cotton blend, not flannel or chenille. It never has a belted tie.

Elastics get the nod over rubber bands for me.

Along the same line, until I actually tasted it, I thought Chinese Pie (P‚tť Chinois) was some type of exotic food. Imagine my surprise (as a kid) to realize the Chinese Pie my friendís mom made was the Shepardís Pie my mom made.
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Old 06-26-2020, 10:58 AM
  #18

While we're at it . . . I visited Ottawa many years ago, and heard an older woman mention the chesterfield in her living room. Is that term still used, or are couch and sofa more commonly said today?

It might be like talking about a Davenport in the United States. I used to hear the word used occasionally, but not anymore.
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Old 06-26-2020, 12:09 PM
  #19

My Detroit grandmother used the words Chesterfield and davenport. She's the only person I have ever heard say those words.
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Old 06-26-2020, 12:52 PM
  #20

Thanks to everyone who has responded! I really enjoyed reading your responses.

My Midwestern grandpa used to say davenport, but I've never heard anyone else say it.
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Old 06-26-2020, 01:38 PM
  #21

I still say chesterfield at times
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Old 06-26-2020, 01:39 PM
  #22

I'm not Canadian, but I did hear the word housecoat used frequently growing up in Louisiana.
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Old 06-26-2020, 03:45 PM
  #23

I am Canadian too and say all those words, plus chesterfield!


I say Kraft Dinner not KD though. And I think of a housecoat as a dressing gown with a zipper and dressing gown and bathrobe are interchangeable for me.


I always say elastics...so you know those elastic balls they sell? Do Americans call them rubber band balls? That seems weird to me.


I think of a chesterfield as like an old fashioned type of couch...like your grandma would have in her "formal living" room and couch to be something more comfy and casual. So I only call certain couches "chesterfields".


Another questions...do Americans use the term loveseat? Or is that just us?
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Old 06-26-2020, 03:48 PM
  #24

In the Midwest, at least, a loveseat is a small couch, big enough for two people.

An elastic ball would just be called a rubber ball (without the word "band") since it's not made of bands, just rubber.
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Old 06-26-2020, 04:26 PM
  #25

Midwesterner and it's housecoat in our family.
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Old 06-26-2020, 04:41 PM
  #26

bgracie...I meant the balls that are actually made of elastics..."elastic balls!"
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Old 06-26-2020, 06:52 PM
  #27

Honestly, I wouldn't be surprised to hear them called rubber band balls.

I just typed rubber band ball into Google Images, and I got similar images to what you posted.
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Old 06-27-2020, 05:18 PM
  #28

I'm from Canada and have a whole set of eavestroughs in my driveway to go up. Some of the parts are on back order so I guess I'll just sit around in my robe with my hair in an elastic. No KD for me though ...university is over!
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