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AnonSPEDteach AnonSPEDteach is offline
 
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Push-in SPED is NOT ALWAYS best
Old 09-02-2021, 06:11 AM
 
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I’m so tired of the obsession with push-in! Sure it’s great for kids who are mostly working at grade level and need help with their assignments, but if that’s the case, why are they in SPED? Please tell me how I’m supposed to best serve a 5th grader reading at a kinder level, simply by going into his classroom to help him “keep up” with an assignment he doesn’t even understand in the first place. What really grinds my gears now is that they just gave us a REALLY good reading program for kids with dyslexia (which can ONLY be done in small groups), yet they are still pushing this agenda of “everyone needs to be in gen Ed 100% of the day.” So why did you purchase this very expensive small group reading program, just to tell us that we need to do all our services via push in?! I’m starting to think that these sped departments have absolutely NO idea what the f*** they’re talking about, they’re just saying whatever they think sounds nice and warm and fuzzy. No critical thinking about what’s actually good for students.


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Old 09-02-2021, 08:39 AM
 
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I 100% agree. To qualify for sped they need to be 2 or more years below grade level. An INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan can’t be executed in a gen Ed classroom. If it could it wouldn’t be individualized.

The higher ups are afraid of more restrictive environments and getting sued.
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Old 09-02-2021, 12:27 PM
 
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I agree. I understand the idea of not having all the special education kids in self-contained classrooms, as used to happen. But they also are entitled to receive instruction AT THEIR OWN LEVEL, just the same was general ed students receive instruction at their level.

Assuming (which isn't always wise) that the IEP meeting was well run and parents agreed, there shouldn't be reason for a lawsuit. But we all know that some people will sue about anything.

I hope you get to make use of that reading program your students need.
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Old 09-02-2021, 12:52 PM
 
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Agreed. My most difficult class is only really hard because of a handful of students who shouldn't have been pushed in. They need one on one time and they're not getting it, so they're acting out and needing to be addressed constantly at the expense of everyone's learning and my own ability to teach. I'm all for inclusion until it gets to that point.
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Meeting with Parents
Old 09-02-2021, 02:00 PM
 
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What would happen if when you meet with parents of special ed students, you would explain their child's academic level and then ask if they want their child's materials presented in a small group environment or in the regular classroom?

Explain the benefits of the small group environment and when the parents agree, place the request in the IEP.

I am not a special ed teacher, so maybe this is a non-starter. I do teach reading and math intervention, and ours is a pull-out, small group program.


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Agreed!
Old 09-02-2021, 02:23 PM
 
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I agree! We had this conversation at my old school all the time, too about intervention time. Students who are below grade level shouldn't be spending intervention time/special ed. time getting extra support with the classroom work. They should be receiving instruction to fill the gaps.Yes, some support, modifications, and differentiation will be necessary to grade level work, but just doing that isn't going to be effective when they are multiple grade levels behind. They need gaps filled.
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Old 09-02-2021, 02:28 PM
 
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Yup. There is a big push in my elem school starting last year ( of all years!!) for sped push in/ co teaching. I just can't do the whole " buy in". Another reason I'm taking early retirement next June.
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Old 09-02-2021, 03:16 PM
 
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I've said this for forever. If gen ed was working, they wouldn't end up in sped. I think a lot of people think the whole push-in thing is to save money. That just hasn't been my experience at all. I can pull kids from 3-4 classrooms at the same time. I can't be in 3 classrooms at the same time. Basically, the only reason I managed to avoid "co-teaching" when it was in it's heyday in my district was because I always had too many students/grade levels. My home state is pretty much mandated full inclusion for mild/moderate and it's extremely common for there to be 1 sped teacher per grade level. They could run a pull out program with far fewer staff members.

My district was all in on the co-teaching bandwagon several years ago. In fact, when they built our new buildings, they purposefully did not build spaces for any non-classroom or specials teachers (i.e. sped, title, EL) because they wanted to force a push-in model. We actually know how to do intervention at my school and we never did any of it. We're also the only remaining title 1 elementary in the district, and have significantly higher test scores than the rest of the district and consistently score well above the state average as well. So you'd think maybe we're the ones doing the right thing??

The absolute crazy thing is that a couple of years ago the district brought in this big reading guru from the state; this program/department had a heavy focus on sped specifically. I had to go to hours and hours of training (thankfully, paid or during the school day) to "learn" how to teach kids how to read via structured literacy. We've been doing that at my school for years. And guess where these lessons take place? In a small group in a PULL OUT program!

Did anyone from the district ever take any accountability for shoving push in down our throats for years before this? Even acknowledge that they were the ones who needed to "change direction?" No, of course not. I know one school that really tried to actually embrace the co-teaching program and do what the district originally wanted had to have a big meeting with our sped director and other district admins basically to hear that they were doing it wrong (of course, their data was lower than everyone else's). I'd be so furious if I were at that school. District admins are the ones who told them to do it in the first place! They were actually the only ones who listened!
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My Soapbox!
Old 09-02-2021, 04:04 PM
 
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This topic really gets me up on my soapbox!

Number one: it is just as wrong to force all sped students into full inclusion as it was to force all sped students into self-contained classrooms! The "I" in IEP means individualized - each student gets what is best for her/him, not what the current fad is.

Number two: if being in a typical classroom resulted in students learning typically, then being in a library would result in students reading without any additional instruction, and being in a concert hall would result in students playing musical instruments without any additional instruction. Frogfeathers!!!

The greatest need in education, and particularly in special education, is COMMON SENSE!
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Old 09-02-2021, 04:59 PM
 
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Even with basic skills. If a child is missing some basic skills, they need to go back and remediate. For example, a fifth grader may be working on multi digit multiplication. But you need to be able to add partial products. What if you don't know addition facts or don't remember how to regroup? Years ago, I taught basic skills. I also taught "supplemental", kids with IEPS who had the subject with their mainstream teacher then I supplemented (before we had resource). Not certified for special ed. But great experience and helped me understand how helpful a good remedial program can be.


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Same
Old 09-02-2021, 07:53 PM
 
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Totally agree. I don't understand how "equity" is achieved by packing my inclusion period full to fulfill the legal requirements. It creates chaos, too many for individual help even if behavior wasn't abysmal (it is), and no equity for anyone in the end.
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Totally, 100% Agree!
Old 09-03-2021, 10:36 AM
 
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I have been saying this for years. When a sped teacher pushes in just to help the child keep up with lesson...to me that is no different than when I ask my para to help someone who was gone and needs a little 1:1 to catch up. It is not helping the sped student at their level. It is beyond frustrating.

I'm just glad to see I'm not the only one who thinks this.
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Old 09-11-2021, 08:48 AM
 
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And how can only two sped teachers possibly meet all the required minutes if the students are spread around the school. Billy in Ms K's room, Sara in Mr. B's room, Josh in Ms L's room, Francis in Mr. J's room...their minutes can't possibly be met by two teachers unless all the iep'd students are in one room thus putting too much onto one teacher.
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