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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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How to block out/ignore?
Old 02-26-2019, 02:20 PM
 
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I'm trying hard to stop letting every little thing in my class bother me. It's tough, because there is constant noise - pencils tapping, reading aloud, humming, etc. This goes on during teaching, as well as during independent work.
I realize that I've been addressing every distraction, and it's become an even bigger distraction! But the little noises are like nails on a chalkboard to me, and I find myself raising my voice when I'm teaching. The noises aren't loud enough that I MUST raise my voice, but I think I do it to drown out the noise so I don't get frustrated and distracted.
I know that I need to learn to ignore the little distracitons. The tapping pencils, and other noises are not enough to cause a real distraction, by my addressing them is.
How can I stop letting these things bother me????


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Blocking out noise
Old 02-26-2019, 02:34 PM
 
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Have you tried classical or “spa” music? Played low, it helps some kids concentrate, some stop making noises, and some will tune their noise to the music.

One thing I used to do in my second grade classroom was to find a long meditative/new ageism videowith music...you know the kind...beautiful scenery to meditative music or even nature sounds.

It got to the point the kids would often ask for it during Writers Workshop.
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Following....
Old 02-26-2019, 02:39 PM
 
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I am having the same issue. Mine beat on tables. I am on the 2nd floor, so when a child stomps or beats the whole floor shakes and I know the teacher below my room hears it. I hear all kinds of noises when I visit other 1st floor rooms.

It is hard to talk over the noise. I was taught not to try to give instruction when there is talking going on. Getting them quiet is getting harder every year.

Frankly, I am exhausted and my throat hurts all the time from trying to get the class' attention. I have been teaching 26 years in middle school.
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Keltikmom, yes
Old 02-26-2019, 02:44 PM
 
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I have tried classical music. They just get louder or complain about the music. I might try just playing a video of relaxing scenes and music on the board-good idea. I feel like my 6th grades are about to bust out of their skin all the time. So, so fidgety.
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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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Beating on tables, too.
Old 02-26-2019, 03:24 PM
 
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That's another one. I have issues with my voice (recurring vocal cord cysts), so I have to be really careful about my voice. I can project really well, and know the range that I am comfortable with - it's actually quite loud. But if I start raising above that l can damage my vocal cords very easily.

I do play instrumental music in the morning when they are doing MathWhizz on the computers. It's upbeat and seems to work really well. I may try it when they are working independently. Still not sure what to do while I'm instructing.


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Noises
Old 02-26-2019, 05:47 PM
 
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I, too, can be bothered by noises at times. I realized that my asking kids to stop was making even more noise. I videotaped my class and listened to the recording and I realized how much noise I made.

Can you video your class or record your class and play it back for your kids? I found my kids to be just as reflective as I was and the noise reduced. Many of my students weren’t aware of their noises.

I’ve also realized that many of our students live in noisy environments and they are uncomfortable with silence. Sadly, we have to teach our kids how to be silent and that silence is ok.
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Sleddog, good idea!
Old 02-26-2019, 06:04 PM
 
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I have a Swivl. I should do this!! I like the idea of playing it for the students for reflection purposes.
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Old 02-26-2019, 06:21 PM
 
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I use non-verbal signals.

I talk to my students about how distracting their fidgeting and noises can be, and I teach them to find quiet ways to fidget--twiddling their thumbs under the table, tapping their pencils on their upper thigh rather than the table, or wiggling their toes inside their shoes. I also have a silent signal that they understand means they are doing something distracting and they need to do choose a quiet way to fidget. When I gently touch their shoulder and give them the signal, they know what to do.

If I am working with a small group while the majority of the class is working independently or with a group in a center or station, I keep a bell nearby. If I ring the bell, it means the noise level of the room is unacceptable and they need to lower it. If I have to ring the bell three times, they know there will be a consequence.

I agree that our students are so used to being stimulated and entertained that they are uncomfortable with silence. I also think more and more students have some kind of sensory processing disorder and are sensory seekers, which is why they fidget so much and make unnecessary noises.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:53 AM
 
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What Mrs. Lilbit said.

Particularly the last paragraph... kids aren't learning to "sit still" and we're becoming a society that requires constant motion and "input" that ranges from the television always being on to being inseparable from SmartPhones. In my adult classes, I've taken to giving out squishy stress balls in an attempt to channel some of the energy.
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