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Struggling with classroom control

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Riding4Him Riding4Him is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2013
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Riding4Him
 
Joined: Jul 2013
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Struggling with classroom control
Old 02-26-2019, 06:12 PM
 
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So I feel like I'm a good teacher for building relationships with my students. I listen to them, try to find strengths to help them in areas that they are struggling in, give consequences that are natural and I'm fair. But this year has been tough. I have a few that are taking advantage of me. I have one student (3rd grade btw) that is diagnosed with ADHD and is out of my classroom for two pullouts a day. He has been running every classroom since he's been here in kinder. I could tell right away that we needed to have that talk that medication is now the route to take. He's better, not having melt downs in class, but he's finding other ways to run the show. I have another student who has a history of problems in every school he's been in and parents do not know why he's having problems in our school. Hmmm, now I feel like I struggling to hold the line in class. There just seems to be a lot of talking, goofing off and not staying on task. I just need a new wind to blow through me to help me get back on track.


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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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MaineSub
 
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:46 AM
 
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I'll over-simplify... just to throw some new wind out.

I've found it is very easy to get focused on the problems... So when things get crazy I have a talk with myself--in a large measure because I know that the only behavior I can truly control in the classroom is my own. From your description, it sounds like you are doing a lot of things right. Don't let one or two students ruin that.

Every class has a kid who thinks he or she should be in charge. I recently had a third grader who loves to argue but not very effectively. "You're wrong" is his fallback position. If you try to point out that's not a good way to argue, he'll argue that! I ultimately just refused to have any conversation with him, in part because he was in danger of forcing me to ignore the students who were trying to get the work done. I told him I'd be ignoring him and if he needed to argue it would have to be with himself.

I have a very long fuse, I don't send kids to the office, but I do take the learning environment very seriously. I'm not going to allow one kid to ruin it for everyone else. I chuckle when I remember a second grader who, after several confrontations, would greet me by saying "I know, Mr. B. You'll be the teacher and I'll be the student."

To some degree, I enjoy kids who push the envelope. It's part of their learning process... learning how and where they fit into their environment. It's perhaps unfortunate that the current climate suggests that the kids have more power than teachers--that might be a different topic but it is part of the formula. I find we also tend to explain and justify behavior rather than try to influence it. Controlling students can take huge amounts of energy. When I'm finding myself drained I realize it's time for a change. Often that means I change because it's a whole lot easier than trying to get a student to change.

I'm rambling a bit here... because it's easy to feel like you're fighting... students, parents, the system. Sometimes the only way to win is to refuse to play the game. As for those who you feel are taking advantage of you... well, most kids (there are exceptions) are not really against you. They are just for themselves. Unfortunately, part of our job is to teach them how to balance what they want (or think they need) with the rest of the world, starting with their classroom.
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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Thought...
Old 02-27-2019, 12:28 PM
 
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Put a smile on you face and very kindly say, "I'll be glad to discuss this with you during our next recess. Stick around when everyone else is having free time and we can discuss this further."

Turn and walk away.

You are going to find that these students do not want to speak with you during what they perceive as their free time.

The only winner by doing this will be you.
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