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Consequences for talking
Old 04-04-2019, 03:55 PM
 
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I'm getting so tired of my kids talking, talking, talking! It's become to the point of disrespect as they are ignoring me and continue talking even after direct reminders. Eventually I can get them "with me", but it's becoming exhausting to do over and over. I don't think the fact that spring break is a week away is helping matters. I feel like I've tried everything; speaking sternly, rewarding the ones who are listening, speaking low, phrasing it positively, etc.



I've been trying to think of a consequence for those who ignore my reminders. I teach Kindergarten so I think an immediate consequence that matters to them would be most effective, but I can't think of any good ideas. If I move the kids, they will just talk to someone else, lol.


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Old 04-04-2019, 05:30 PM
 
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I’d go to good, old fashioned time out.
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Old 04-04-2019, 09:34 PM
 
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I teach Kinder too and have a few periods of this during the year. Also, thee last two weeks have been AWFUL so I feel you.

One of my favorite ways to among talking is by earning up (or down) talking privileges. We do voice levels 0-4 with 0 being silence and a 4 being outside or presentation voice. If they're doing independent work I might start them at a 2. If they're not listening, we go down to a 1, If they're still not listening we go to a zero. Alternatively they can earn their voice levels back if they're being good.

If the issue is them talking while you're trying to teach, I like to use natural consequences. For example, yesterday my kids weren't listening whatsoever to our story. I ended up giving them the end of the unit assessment and told them that if they thought they already knew the information and didn't have to listen, they could show me on the test and I could send it home that day. They were all horrified and told me "what if we get 0s!" We did the whole test then I gave them a huge lecture about being in school to learn, and to learn you had to listen, and that they were almost in first grade, etc. Then I threw out the tests, but they didn't know that

If they're talking a lot during transitions, when I walk away, or other times when they shouldn't be we'll also practice procedures over and over again. This week they had trouble going to their tables without talking so we did the whole sitting down, getting up and walking, then sitting back down thing over 5 times in 10 minutes. Usually by the end of it they're more willing to listen.

Or if they keep talking while you are, I've done it a few times where I restart my ENTIRE lesson or video or whatever. I'm trying to explain their next activity and Susy keeps talking over me after reminders? Whoops, not we have to start all over again. Usually peer pressure works there because after the second time the kids start getting antsy to get started or finish up with the story and start encouraging their friend to make better choices.

Today I was playing a video for them about a topic we were learning and 4 boys kept goofing off, whispering to each other, and playing carpet games. Well the rest of the class got dismissed after the video to do a fun headband craft. Those 4 boys had to sit there while we restarted the entire video and watched the whole thing again before they could get started (paired with why it's important that we're listening).
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Old 04-05-2019, 05:55 PM
 
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I'm assuming that this is something that has recently cropped up, not something you've been dealing with all year. Spring fever and all that.



Since activity time is a favorite in my room, that's what I tend to use as a reward/consequence in cases like this. The kids that are listening and following directions get to do activity time, and the others get to practice whatever it is that they are struggling with. The next time we are in a group, I remind everyone of what is going to happen and it usually helps most. Then the few who are still struggling practice again and miss out again. Sometimes it's at the expense of another lesson I was going to do, but it's worth it in the end when I finally get them back on track.



I would also be preemptive and have a quick chat with the worst offenders every time you are going to start a lesson, reminding them of your expectations and how you know they are going to be great models, etc.
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Old 04-06-2019, 04:40 AM
 
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Thanks everyone, I'll be putting these to use!


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Use it!
Old 04-10-2019, 12:04 PM
 
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I have turned things around with talking by using it as a strength. I'll have the kids discuss, giving them a set time and topic. This gives them a chance to talk (because face it, some just like the sound of their own voice), but in a structured way.
Then again, you do teach 5 year olds, and many of them may not be developmentally ready to adapt to such a structured environment.
Make sure that you are only requiring quiet for short periods of time, etc.
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