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Dumb question
Old 02-02-2019, 12:04 AM
 
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This is such a stupid question, I signed out for it.

I have a Masters in reading, although I've never really done anything with it. I've always just been a first grade classroom teacher. I interviewed for a job in another district, and came close but didn't get it. The principal called me later and said he may be hiring a reading interventionist and would like for me to interview for that position if funding becomes available. So here's my question:

Is a reading interventionist considered a "real" teacher? Would I be getting the same salary as a licensed certified teacher? Also, what do they do? I'm picturing that they would pull small groups of struggling readers, but not sure. All grades? Or assigned a grade level? At my current school there is no such position as an interventionist, so I really have no idea. Is it considered a step up from classroom teacher? Or down? Or a lateral move?


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In my district
Old 02-02-2019, 04:18 AM
 
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Definitely a teacher with same salary scale, benefits, etc.

Ours pulls small groups throughout the day/week.

In my district, reading interventionists are building based and work across grade levels.
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Old 02-02-2019, 05:24 AM
 
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I did long term subbing twice after I retired, for reading interventionists and I loved it. They receive the same salary and benefits and were considered literacy leaders in our school. They have a lot of input during the RtI meetings— our district calls them Student Support Teams.

I did a variety of interventions based on which tier the students were in the RtI process—LLI, Sound Partners, OG, Guided Reading Plus. I worked with 1-3 students at a time. It was perfect for me because while I loved teaching the 2nd grade curriculum, literacy is my passion and I got to do that specifically.

At our school it would be considered a lateral move— just specialized. Sort of like the music, art, speech, etc. teachers.
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My District
Old 02-02-2019, 05:40 AM
 
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In my district, reading interventionists are part time with no benefits and hourly pay. They must have reading teacher license if in Title 1 schools.

Our intervention groups are pull-outs across grade levels so I work with kindergarten to fourth grade for thirty minute chunks four days per week. We use a variety of materials including Fountas and Pinnell's Leveled Literacy Intervention. Tier two students are placed in reading intervention if they score below 24% on MAPS testing and are two levels below their grade level in guided reading.

Each building also has a reading specialist (different license than a reading teacher license and full time with the same pay and benefits as a classroom teacher). The reading specialist does some tier two interventions, but all tier three interventions for reading. She also does in-classroom reading demonstrations and works one-on-one with classroom teachers. She schedules all reading intervention groups using MAPS scores and teacher input, supervises interventionists, and does a lot of reading data meetings.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:16 AM
 
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In my district the move is officially lateral - certificated position on the same contract and pay scale as a classroom teacher.

The value assigned to the position varies by building in my district. In most buildings, reading interventionists (called reading specialists b/c that is what anyone teaching one specific subject is called - music specialist, etc) are considered literacy resources for the classroom teachers, work with admin on building reading initiatives, coordinate any reading paraeducators, participate in district committees like ELA curriculum adoption or district literacy committee, etc. In some buildings they have less input and work with the lowest students from each classroom when the classroom teacher wants and on what they want (could be push in or pull out).

Grade level also varies by building here. Most work K-5 based on need. In a few buildings with multiple reading positions, the teachers specialize in a band (k-2, 3-5 or k-1,2-3, 4-5). I’m in a building with 3 reading teachers and we all work k-5.

What else do they do? You may be responsible for, or at least a part of, building wide reading assessments and progress monitoring. You may be a part of the process used to determine whether SPED testing is appropriate. You may participate in IEP meetings, parent teacher conferences, etc. You may he asked to coordinate or help with literacy initiatives or activities like a Fanily Reading Night, Read Across America Day, read-a-thon, Reading incentive programs.


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Old 02-02-2019, 08:18 AM
 
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I LOVED being a reading intervention teacher. I actually did that before I had my own classroom. Small groups from all grades were pulled out throughout the day. We worked on vocabulary development, reading comprehension, fluency, reading strategies, and word attack skills. I used SIPPS, Read Naturally, and assessed using a BPST. It is incredibly rewarding because you see so much growth throughout the year.

It is definitely still considered a "real" teacher. I would say it's a lateral move. The pay depends on the school. I was paid by the hour, but I know some reading intervention teachers are on salary.
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I am a reading interventionist!
Old 02-02-2019, 10:52 AM
 
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It is a lateral move in my district. I have a masters in reading, and that used to be required for my position, but not longer. I believe that is because many teachers do not pursue advanced degrees. I get 3K additional for my masters degree. Reading interventionists are teachers with a proven track record and exceptional knowledge of the reading process. My district uses Fountas and Pinnell. I am very fortunate in that we get ongoing year long training.

All districts are going to be different, but I work primarily with second and third graders, as the state test can result in retention in third grade. I would much prefer to work K-2, but that's not how it is.

My primary intervention tool is LLI. I love LLI and see great progress with most students. We used to be restricted to only using LLI, but now we may use other programs. I use the HELPS program for fluency. It is free and you can train yourself with their website.

I am part of my school's School Based Team, where we make decisions regarding the RTI process. I also am the defacto "reading coach" since my school doesn't qualify for one. I work with the teachers on reading concerns and assist those teachers who are LLI trained and are using it as an intervention in their classrooms.

I also am responsible for CBM's . I print the probes for teachers and input them into the various websites. At my school we primarily use Fastbridge and EasyCBM.

I love be an interventionist, but I do miss having my own class and teaching all subjects. It can be daunting working with striving readers all day, but it is very rewarding when you see progress. Also, there are no report cards, no science fair projects, and all the other "stuff" that goes along with being a classroom teacher.

My position is considered a "dream job" by most teachers (they don't understand how much I do). My principal trusts my judgement on all things reading and I pretty much run my own show. That is not the case in many schools.

I would make a list of your questions. Make sure to ask about intervention programs the school has or would want you to utilize. What kind of training will be available to you? Ask how much input you have in selecting students for intervention and what interventions they will receive. Will you be push in or pull out? How much time is allotted for each group. How many groups a day. Will you be part of a decision making team? Feel free to pm me if you have any questions.
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Something to consider...
Old 02-02-2019, 04:11 PM
 
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First, what a nice compliment that the principal called you.

If the position is dependent on funding, will it be a permanent position or will the school have to submit a request for funding every year? Knowing that may influence your decision.
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Old 02-02-2019, 04:55 PM
 
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It looks different everywhere. Here, interventionists are salaried. In my home state, they're almost always hourly and paid much less than teachers. Here, officially it would be a lateral move, but you may run into teachers that have less respect for a position like that- I've worked with many teachers who felt "having your own classroom" showed that you were somehow a "better" teacher.

You need to ask lots of questions in the interview. For example:

-What do services look like? Will you be pulling out or pushing in?
-Who determines who receives intervention? How is that determined?
-What materials and resources are available? If there is a program available, will you have to teach only that program? Will you have your own room?
-Will you be pulled to sub if there is an uncovered classroom that day?
-What other responsibilities come with the position other than teaching interventions?
-What is the long term stability of the position?
-Will you be working with all grade levels? (And if so, are you comfortable working with intermediate students?)
-Who makes the schedule? Is it pre-determined or are you expected to work around classroom teachers' schedules (can be a nightmare)? Is intervention time protected, or can classroom teachers request that their students not participate that day?

I interviewed for an intervention position this past summer. I knew right away that I didn't want it because the P was very wishy-washy when I asked about being pulled to sub (under our previous P, our interventionists were literally subbing more often than actually teaching their groups) and she also told me that the stability of the position was based on year-to-year funding and wasn't guaranteed.

I would also consider how attached you are to having your own class- being a specialist is very different. We're often not recognized or acknowledged as much as classroom teachers. Although I can still build relationships with kids, it's not the same as being their classroom teacher. You'll also regularly be sitting through PD/meetings that don't apply to you that much, and depending on the school culture may be forgotten as far as supplies/materials, things like that. You also can't do the "fun" parts of school-holiday parties, field trips, special activities, etc. Will you miss teaching other subjects or doing more "fun" lessons?

In order to be effective, interventions need to be very explicit, structured, and systematic. Some teachers don't like this type of teaching at all. I'm a very structured person and have come to enjoy this type of instruction. It's definitely not for everyone though.
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Not a dumb question at all
Old 02-05-2019, 05:48 AM
 
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I am curious as to the answer to this to. I have no idea about the difference either, but I will follow the thread so that I can learn with you.


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I'm sad...
Old 02-09-2019, 12:56 PM
 
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That a teacher would consider any question dumb. You didn't know and a lot of people and teachers probably didn't. Please don't be ashamed of questioning and learning. after all, it's our entire profession!
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title 1
Old 02-11-2019, 07:52 AM
 
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I am a Title 1 teacher. Basically I work in flex groups and interventions. A lot of the students don't think I am a real teacher because I don't have a classroom anymore. My salary didn't change or my status as a teacher. I do enjoy having my small groups. However I have seen that interventions is hard to get out of if you want to go back and be a classroom teacher.
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