When Did It Start? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

When Did It Start?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Cloud99's Avatar
Cloud99 Cloud99 is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 104
Full Member

Cloud99
 
Cloud99's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 104
Full Member
When Did It Start?
Old 03-10-2018, 03:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I regularly read the posts here. Today I was reading a post that said, "he's interrupting the education of all of the other students in the classroom and that needs to stop."

It is not an uncommon statement now, but when I first started teaching I rarely heard this.

Any ideas on why disruptive behaviors are increasing or what to do about it?


Cloud99 is offline   Reply With Quote

GiantSubs's Avatar
GiantSubs GiantSubs is offline
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 2,591
Senior Member

GiantSubs
 
GiantSubs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 2,591
Senior Member
The increase in disruptive students
Old 03-10-2018, 03:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

happens for a multitude of reasons:
  1. parents don't believe their children do anything wrong and won't support the teacher
  2. administrators don't want to deal with angry parents, so they don't hold up the discipline standards
  3. children spend too much time disengaged from people and on electronic devices
  4. children don't respect adults or each other because they are entitled
  5. teachers are blamed for things children and parents do wrong
The new generation of parents is going to raise an entire generation of children who don't know how to overcome adversity, want everything handed to them without having to work for it, and won't know how to deal with expectations and deadlines. It's my biggest pet peeve about being a teacher - having to watch it without being able to do much about it. I do what I can where I can though - not going down without a fight!
GiantSubs is offline   Reply With Quote
Overlightnes's Avatar
Overlightnes Overlightnes is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 855
Senior Member

Overlightnes
 
Overlightnes's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 855
Senior Member

Old 03-10-2018, 05:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

"The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers."

-Socrates (469-399 B.C.)
Overlightnes is offline   Reply With Quote
klarabelle's Avatar
klarabelle klarabelle is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 24,089
Senior Member

klarabelle
 
klarabelle's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 24,089
Senior Member

Old 03-10-2018, 05:44 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I think part of the problem is that children no longer have play time beginning in K. K was where you learned to socialize and didn't have to worry about learning how to test. I wish we went back to play in K and developmental stages in teaching.
klarabelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,639
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,639
Senior Member

Old 03-10-2018, 07:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I have also wondered what kind of social/emotional impacts pushing academic skills down has had. In addition to not getting the play time to build those specific skills, think of the issues we're creating (anxiety, self-esteem/self-efficacy issues, even depression) with kids who simply develop a little later and aren't ready to read in K.

Our preschool is even getting pressure to take away play-based learning in favor of "more academics." It's such a hard transition for the kids to go from preschool to Kindergarten in my district.

In the preschool the kids are mostly playing and have a few lessons that are no longer than 5 minutes. Although of course our K teachers try to incorporate a lot of movement, the kids are doing "regular" reading, writing, and math lessons all day long for 6+ hours. The only "free play" our Kinders get is recess. I often hear that K is the new 1st grade. I wouldn't at all be surprised if we get to a point where preschool is the new 1st grade.


Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote
TheTrunch's Avatar
TheTrunch TheTrunch is offline
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,381
Senior Member

TheTrunch
 
TheTrunch's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,381
Senior Member
Restorative Justice
Old 03-10-2018, 07:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

or in other words, no discipline. It was emphasized by the former president and his secretary of education because they felt like Black students were disciplined too much. It's everywhere now. California measures school success by how few suspensions there are. California also just started a new social emotional mandate that dictates Restorative Justice. Sec of Ed King promoted it heavily and Pres. Obama issued his Dear Colleague letter that warned schools: https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/li...1-title-vi.pdf
TheTrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
NatureLvr's Avatar
NatureLvr NatureLvr is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 946
Senior Member

NatureLvr
 
NatureLvr's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 946
Senior Member

Old 03-10-2018, 08:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I agree that the older generation has always grumbled about the problems with the younger generation, but at least in school there used to be some standards for behavior. When I was in school I don't remember any student throwing a screaming tantrum. When I started working in schools in the early 1990's, tantrum were rare among all students, including those with special needs. By the time I left in 2016, tantrums occurred almost daily for reasons such as the cafeteria ran out of pepperoni pizza or students had to stay on the blacktop for recess because the field was too waterlogged.

Why? I'm not sure. I think the reasons are many and intertwined. In my (limited) experience, it works for some kids. No pepperoni pizza? Scream and someone will come rushing in to sooth, placate, and fix it. That was my school experience. Other kids come from lousy home situations and never learn control. Maybe their parents act this way too. Plenty of times the blame was deflected to the teacher and the school and nothing was expected of the student. Tantrum? Someone must have set the student off.

I guess this isn't much help, but it's just my observation. It is one (the big) reason why I left working in a school. I was the dumping ground for misbehaving students and parents. I was responsible for them but given no authority to deal with them.

Last edited by NatureLvr; 03-10-2018 at 08:53 PM.. Reason: grammar
NatureLvr is online now   Reply With Quote
Newto3s
 
 
Guest

Newto3s
 
 
Guest

Old 03-10-2018, 09:13 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

This is probably going to get negative responses, but I feel it is the truth. When they took God out of school. I never went to public school, but I know many people who did. They tell me of times when they prayed or religious topics were brought up (in an participation, not a debate or putting it down).

If I had to pick something else, I'd say least restrictive environment. The name itself shows the all for one attitude that's in public schools now. A child can literally terrorize a classroom, but if the family doesn't want them in a special class or school, well tough nuggies to everyone else. I saw this time and time again in my career in the public schools. I saw three year olds who were showing violence and poor mental health, but mom doesn't sunny boy (in my experience it was boys) labeled or to be embarrassed, so tough if he hurts an adult (happened), breaks school property (happened with multiple expensive things including computers), or injuries other students (just gets moved to another regular classroom). Send mom the bill? She'll play the single mother/welfare card. We need to go back to putting students where they belong. I don't think school should be a "right". If you're child has been kicked out of many schools, maybe you should have to home school them. You're not working. I had a child suspended because he assaulted a guest that came to the school. The suspension was reversed because Ms. I don't work refused to keep him home. How does that happen?

I don't deal with any of this in the private school I work at now.
  Reply With Quote
newsubLisa newsubLisa is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 95
Full Member

newsubLisa
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 95
Full Member

Old 03-11-2018, 05:22 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

My response probably isn't going to be popular either. I don't believe students behaved any worse in the past, but if they did the were paddled - either by the school and/or by their parents. So many students were scared or terrified into behaving. We now know better, and instead of forcing children to fight their natural instincts to move, we need to come up with creative ways to work with it. The reduction in recess time, increasing academic workload, and kids being less active overall definitely contributes as well. But I definitely don't agree it's because parents aren't teaching their children how to behave these days - they just are no longer beating them into submission as was done in the past.

Lisa
newsubLisa is offline   Reply With Quote
spedder1's Avatar
spedder1 spedder1 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 6,318
Senior Member

spedder1
 
spedder1's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 6,318
Senior Member
That was my post
Old 03-11-2018, 05:33 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Taken out of context, it sounds like he's a spoiled rotten brat who gets whatever he wants at home and expects the same at school. In reality he is moderately intellectually disabled and has a medical diagnosis that has characteristics that mimic autism. The family is having the same issues that I'm having at school.

On a good note, because I am communicating with the family honestly, but kindly, they seem to have done something. I'm not sure if they are cracking down on him at home or if he is on medication, but he was absent two days this past week. When he came to school he was a different child. I wrote a note to the parents telling them that he had 2 wonderful days and whatever they were doing at home was working at school and to keep it up.

Kathy


spedder1 is offline   Reply With Quote
NatureLvr's Avatar
NatureLvr NatureLvr is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 946
Senior Member

NatureLvr
 
NatureLvr's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 946
Senior Member
Spedder1
Old 03-11-2018, 05:41 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

That's good to hear; sounds like you're doing the right thing! It's so great when the parents and the schools can work together for the student.
NatureLvr is online now   Reply With Quote
Izzy23 Izzy23 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,949
Senior Member

Izzy23
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,949
Senior Member

Old 03-11-2018, 05:42 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Quote:
When they took God out of school. I never went to public school, but I know many people who did. They tell me of times when they prayed or religious topics were brought up (in an participation, not a debate or putting it down).
I did go to a public school and we never prayed. Please stop spreading the myth that "God" used to be in public schools. It wasn't, in my experience. And if it was in others, then it was unconstitutional.
Izzy23 is offline   Reply With Quote
juliet4's Avatar
juliet4 juliet4 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,346
Senior Member

juliet4
 
juliet4's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,346
Senior Member
Newto3s
Old 03-11-2018, 05:58 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Hmm...just what god are you suggesting we put back? Would prayers from the Koran each morning be acceptable? Jewish? Muslim? Mormon? Buddhist? Wicca? Christian? Catholic? See what I mean? Bible Belt Christians make this assumption that everyone would find that their god would help but it seems that there has been more divisiveness in gods name in this country lately rather than love and acceptance.
juliet4 is offline   Reply With Quote
kristeacher kristeacher is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 328
Full Member

kristeacher
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 328
Full Member
Today's kids
Old 03-11-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I think in today's world, there a multitude of things which have caused or contributed to the behavior problems we are seeing in the classroom.
* too many parents want to be their kids' friends and kids live with no or limited limitations or consequences. Parents need to say no and mean it.
* parents are spread thin- working long hours
*kids are spread too thin.
* kids are in front of technology too many hours- this causes no personal interaction and instant gratification-
* kids are use to being entertained, and don't know how to be bored and how that can lead to creativity- reading, playing etc..
* all kids win- competition is eliminated- so students don't get the chance to learn how to lose.This takes away their time to practice coping with not winning.
* parents are scared to just let kids play by themselves in the neighborhood, so interactions between kids are under parents' microscope and micromanaged by parents.
* Family dinner time is no longer sacred
Being a parent of 2 teenagers, I have committed many of the above, but the one thing I make sure I do is not be my kids' friend. I tell them I am there for the long haul. I don't care if they dislike me when I set limits or say no or ground them. My goal is not to be their friend it is for them to grow into a responsible and respectful adult.
This is a work in progress.
kristeacher is offline   Reply With Quote
stephenPE's Avatar
stephenPE stephenPE is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 249
Full Member

stephenPE
 
stephenPE's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 249
Full Member

Old 03-11-2018, 08:01 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Quote:
This is probably going to get negative responses, but I feel it is the truth. When they took God out of school. I never went to public school, but I know many people who did. They tell me of times when they prayed or religious topics were brought up (in an participation, not a debate or putting it down).
I went to school when, as you put it, God was in school. We prayed in the morning sometimes, always before lunch and in 2nd grade we read bible verses. Like most subjects or ideas presented in school we endured it. I liked reading the bible verses because I read well. But that teacher also had a paddle called Big Boy. It was a solid piece of pine we all avoided. I know she got me with it a few times. That was the single biggest influence most of us had in grades 1-6 and even in my HS. WE KNEW bad behavior resulted in immediate punishment. It stung. It was in front of the class. Nobody was injured. All my peers grew up to (almost all) be productive hard working Americans. Some of us went to church some didn't.
Children knew who was in charge and most NEVER got a paddling because they didnt want one and followed the rules. Some got paddled and would try to be good but would slack and get it again. THat was me. About 3% you could beat all day and that attention was fine with them. Didnt work.

I believe in a higher power (God if you will) but little of any organized faith's tenants about it. I have been in public schools since 1961. Kids are still kids until they are allowed to raise themselves and then all kinds of odd things happen especially with all the technological and social media things we have now. I blame lousy parenting. Single parenting (where some women (and even men) are doing a great job. But fathers are missing or awful in too many childhoods. Lawyers, litigation and SOO much bllsh#t teachers have to do in addition to teaching has made it the perfect storm. AND OF COURSE the politicians just use education as a political football to kick around and give lip service. "SEE we told you school are failing cause the cannot do X Y and Z well" Well, they have micro-managed it to death in the mane of ACCOUNTABILITY that it is impossible to succeed on their terms...........Children are the real victims in classroom management........IT TAKES an amazing person (teacher) to keep a classroom running smoothly with all the distractions, interruptions, badly messed up kids (for whatever reason), data nonsense testing. etc etc. One kid can ruin the chemistry of a class in a heartbeat. If the leader of the class is a reprobate or worse then the class usually follows. I salute all teachers plodding on with all this baggage and needful kids. These kids need us more now than ever. If the politicians would see fit to get out of the way there may be a chance of success. btw I love my job and the last 40 years of it.
stephenPE is offline   Reply With Quote
TheTrunch's Avatar
TheTrunch TheTrunch is offline
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,381
Senior Member

TheTrunch
 
TheTrunch's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,381
Senior Member
There's some things we can't control
Old 03-11-2018, 08:30 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

But when the system limits discipline, then that's a whole new story. The current trend in most of California is NO time outs and NO negative discipline.

Of course when you're dealing with students with autism or emotionally disturbed students, it's a different ball game. However, in those cases the administration must be involved. Students with autism can absolutely improve and fit in. If they aren't making social progress, that's an indicator of poor school administration (speech/language/ counselors etc) as well as poor parental involvement. Some students with severe disabilities need to be in sp day classes. Teachers need to become familiar with the symptoms of autism all along the spectrum (as well as ADHD). I work with a student now who is obviously on the spectrum and I adjust a few things for him and it works.

For the majority: Time Out Works. I'm not talking about sitting off to the side during a lesson. I would not do that because they're missing the lesson. I'm talking about from playtime and fun time.

Time outs can be given and they can be taken back. If I give a time out and the student makes a 180, then before break I will take away the time out.

Time outs need to be progressive. I start at a couple of minutes and go to the entire recess.

One student I had was particularly difficult. My progression and repetition of time outs seemed to have no effect. I then upped it. I waited for him before school so he couldn't play before school. I gave him time out all. day. long. Every Day. Finally, I WON. He was the hardest ever kid to break from his bad habits, but once he did, he started to learn and quit disrupting the class.

I'm intervention now, so I don't deal with that, but I see the effects of the new rules of no time outs. It's bad. Really bad.
TheTrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
Loveslabs Loveslabs is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 902
Senior Member

Loveslabs
 
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 902
Senior Member
Parents
Old 03-11-2018, 08:42 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

I go to an extremely expensive hair salon because my cousin only charges me 25% of her going rate. Yesterday, I overheard a woman there say, I cant wait until my youngest is 12 because then Im done parenting. I think by 12 she should be able to finish raising herself.
This woman was very serious. She continued on about how she will be 45 years old then and can get back to living her own life. She stated she is most looking forward to going out and drinking and partying without having to take her child into consideration.
Perhaps this is part of the problem.....
Loveslabs is offline   Reply With Quote
georgieboy's Avatar
georgieboy georgieboy is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Full Member

georgieboy
 
georgieboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Full Member
That is
Old 03-11-2018, 09:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

the exact reason I left.
georgieboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Summerwillcom's Avatar
Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,319
Senior Member

Summerwillcom
 
Summerwillcom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,319
Senior Member
At different times perhaps dependent on
Old 03-11-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

where you lived/taught. Parents can be a huge part of the problem or solution. I spent many yrs in a school where parents expected their kids to behave and believed the teacher. The parents, I am pretty sure, spanked their kids and I see nothing wrong with that. If you swat a kid at 2, 3, 4 yrs old, I doubt we'd have a lot of the problems we have now. The P's gave kids swats for serious infractions when needed. I see nothing wrong w/ that either. It deterred bad behavior and taught some that there were consequences to their actions. ( This could be done without corporal punishment too.) They had an unpleasant ISS room too.
Our schools in many places lack any consequences for bad behavior. It is kinder to teach them young than to wait until they mouth off , throw something at, or attack a cop or boss and end up w/ life changing consequences. For the most part, parents want to be their child's " cool friend and defender" where I live now. That's not working. Another huge part is they used to not put seriously emotionally disturbed kids in a regular classroom. If I had to pick just 1 reason it has gotten so far out of hand, that would be it. It seems like a lot of people on here think spanking a kid is like child abuse. I think there are usually better consequences to teach with, but I don't see a problem w/ it as long as it is not done in anger and is meant to teach the child. I would be happy with any meaningful consequence that worked to teach that was not just practiced by the teacher, but supported by the admin.
Summerwillcom is offline   Reply With Quote
pausebutton's Avatar
pausebutton pausebutton is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 986
Senior Member

pausebutton
 
pausebutton's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 986
Senior Member

Old 03-11-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

I teach in the same approximate area that I grew up...so for me, I honestly don't think kids throughout my 12 years of teaching are that different from kids when I was a student myself. Every year, there always seems to be the same types including trouble makers. I feel like when I was little, I would also hear teachers shake their heads and say, "Kids these days".
pausebutton is offline   Reply With Quote
anna's Avatar
anna anna is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 16,226
Senior Member

anna
 
anna's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 16,226
Senior Member

Old 03-11-2018, 03:22 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

This problem started when district admin figured out a way to put money in their own pockets by cutting back services to special needs kids . This is done in the name of "least restrictive environment" and no one remembers the word "appropriate." The low income students (translate mostly minority students) suffer the most . I have been busy teaching the younger teachers how to defend themselves
anna is offline   Reply With Quote
3leggedtable 3leggedtable is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 394
Senior Member

3leggedtable
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 394
Senior Member
Massachusetts
Old 03-11-2018, 05:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

* The curriculum is not age appropriate
* No leveling of students K-8
* Elimination of resource room for disruptive students
* Obama era rules that thwart schools from suspending disruptive students
* Parents cannot hear ANY criticism of students
* no disciple at home


I could write all night, but these are my top suspects.
3leggedtable is offline   Reply With Quote
Tawaki's Avatar
Tawaki Tawaki is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 3,817
Senior Member

Tawaki
 
Tawaki's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 3,817
Senior Member
About God in school..
Old 03-11-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

If you don't believe, what do you care what a *higher power/guy in the sky thinks as you tear up a room or shove a kid to the ground?

And who's God?

My sister's district was all fives and keep it coming when the Evangelical community was distributing flyers promoting their church functions. They were put in the kids back packs at the end of the day.

It came to a big screeching halt when the 7 Day Adventist, Mormons, the Jehovah's Witnesses and a Buddhist temple wanted the same access.

My two cents worth, there are just more screwed up kids being born to parents who haven't a clue what to do with them. It's all about shutting the kid up. Being the adult is hard work. Too many people phone it in, ans expect others to clean up the wreckage.
Tawaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Starr Starr is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,725
Senior Member

Starr
 
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,725
Senior Member

Old 03-12-2018, 02:11 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

I've been at the same school for well over 10 years. There were always a small percentage of students with a range of behavior issues, but for the most part, the kids were respectful, cooperative, and easy to work with. It's just the past 2 to 3 years that I see major changes. While most students aren't overtly rude or defiant, I see a big change in respect and following directions, being able to stay focused, persevere on a task, etc.
I think the current trend of having a "student centered" classroom (where students are encouraged to NOT stay and work at their desks, i.e. lie on the floor or stand at a counter top), as well as lack of consequences for misbehavior, definitely plays a role.
Starr is offline   Reply With Quote
stephenPE's Avatar
stephenPE stephenPE is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 249
Full Member

stephenPE
 
stephenPE's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 249
Full Member

Old 03-14-2018, 03:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

Quote:
* The curriculum is not age appropriate
* No leveling of students K-8
* Elimination of resource room for disruptive students
* Obama era rules that thwart schools from suspending disruptive students
* Parents cannot hear ANY criticism of students
* no disciple at home
Your first one is dead on. We have time out areas and suspensions all the time for disruptive kids.
I have to say I agree with most of what everyone posted. Some school districts are able to maintain some semblance of sanity in this age of political micro managing schools but large districts seem to be more at the mercy of
so much crazy going on. Children suffer. Good (most of them in my experience) teachers suffer. America suffers.
stephenPE is offline   Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,260
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,260
Senior Member
Lots of Reasons
Old 03-14-2018, 05:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #26

I agree with lots of the reasons already posted.

We're pushing the curriculum younger and younger, and they aren't ready.

Kids lack the free time to process all that information. They used to learn self-control when they played.

Kids are tired - all the time, so they don't even realize it. It's harder to behave when you're tired.

Parents are judged - all the time. Their discipline is wishy-washy because they don't have confidence that they're right.

We've gone too far with inclusion. Some is good! But sometimes, a regular classroom is not appropriate, and one student shouldn't always come before the other 24.

Leveling wasn't all bad. We needed to fix the problem of kids getting "stuck" in one track, but instead, we scrapped the whole system. The thing is, kids act out when the material is too high or too low for them.

Society has changed in that people are now used to what-they-want, when-they-want-it. Kids are no exception.
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
MKat MKat is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 6,479
Senior Member

MKat
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 6,479
Senior Member

Old 03-14-2018, 10:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #27

I totally disagree with "we've taken God out of the schools." First of all, as a Christian I believe God is in the schools. However, I believe strongly in freedom of religion and NOT a state religion. Religions should be practiced freely by people, not enforced by the state in public venues. Personally I think people have taken religious practice (of whatever form) and/or solid family values and traditions (spending time as a family, eating meals together, having a routine kids can count on, etc.) out of their HOMES and that is affecting public schools.

IMO, what is missing from schools lately is good parenting, community support of schools and school staff, strong systems based on experience, and plain old common sense.

I also agree with those who have talked about PLAY. Not only do we need to make more time for free play in schools, we need to make more time for it in society in general.
MKat is offline   Reply With Quote
mrsf70's Avatar
mrsf70 mrsf70 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 432
Senior Member

mrsf70
 
mrsf70's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 432
Senior Member

Old 03-15-2018, 01:28 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #28

I feel the article below is spot on for many of the issues we see today.

https://www.yourmodernfamily.com/sca...-hurting-kids/
mrsf70 is offline   Reply With Quote
applesaucencr applesaucencr is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 109
Full Member

applesaucencr
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 109
Full Member

Old 03-15-2018, 05:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #29

* The curriculum is not age appropriate
* No leveling of students K-8
* Elimination of resource room for disruptive students
* Obama era rules that thwart schools from suspending disruptive students
* Parents cannot hear ANY criticism of students
* no disciple at home




Yep, completely agree with all these. Many kids act out because they can't understand the material because there simply isn't enough leveled grouping. It doesn't mean students have to be stuck at the same level forever, they need to be working at *their* current level. And that includes students who are above grade level. And, the stupid high stakes testing at the elementary level before 5th grade. Sure, do testing but use it to inform instruction not penalize schools and students.


Also, the move away from programs that helped students with behavioral problems. Separate classrooms actually HELPED these kids learn self regulation and SEL skills so they could integrate back into mainstream classes. Most were back in regular classes within 2 years and others were moved into classes for students with learning disabilities and the behavior issues were under control if not completely resolved.

And, this may get me criticism, but giving too much support/help so that schools become parents. The schools provide multiple meals, clothing, before/afterschool daycare, therapy, transportation for parents, even helping with housing and medical care. Unfortunately what started out with good intentions has led to rampant abuse of local and state resources.
applesaucencr is offline   Reply With Quote
Gr8Profession Gr8Profession is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 921
Senior Member

Gr8Profession
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 921
Senior Member
I've recently moved to a new state.
Old 03-21-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #30

I'm subbing now. The district I'm in ends the announcements each morning with "This is the day the Lord has made, have a (terrific Tuesday)" and teachers pray before they take their classes to lunch. They also paddle students. The upper elementary grades have some of the worst behavior issues I've encountered.

The whole situation is rather shocking to me.
Gr8Profession is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:28 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net