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70Primrose 70Primrose is offline
 
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70Primrose
 
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Teacher PTSD???
Old 08-25-2019, 07:59 PM
 
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Do you think it is possible for a teacher to get PTSD from a very difficult year of teaching. I had students in my class that seriously had the diagnosis of PTSD. They were not disrespectful. They always told me how much they loved me, but their behavior from their trauma filled lives and the worry, interruptions, calls to CPS, meetings...I am really having some major anxiety about going back tomorrow. I donít think I have recovered from the mental exhaustion yet.


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dee dee is offline
 
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For sure!
Old 08-26-2019, 01:00 AM
 
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This is a new year, so hopefully it will be better!

Take good care of yourself this year!
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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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Self-care...
Old 08-26-2019, 04:52 AM
 
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I would be cautious about self-diagnosis... I think we are sometimes too quick to label conditions.

Having said that, I think I understand the anxiety. Some "self-care" may well be in order to avoid becoming overwhelmed this year. There are many options and part of the challenge is discovering the one(s) that are going to work for you.

The commonality is that they all shift your focus from others to yourself. Exercise, yoga, meditation... I believe one important aspect is to think about how you are going to think because that will directly impact how you feel.

I know, for example, that by nature I am a rescuer and a nurturer. It, therefore, becomes important to place realistic limits on myself. I'm not worried about PTSD but I know how easy it is to burn out. Too often, we lose good people (teachers) to burn out. They quit or retire, effectively leaving the stress behind. It's not selfish; it's survival. It's better to find the balance.

One of the best lessons I learned regarding "classroom management" is that the only behavior I can truly control is my own. I can't fix everything--that doesn't mean I don't try, but it does mean I stay grounded. If you're a country western music fan, sing some Kenny Rogers "You gotta know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em, know when to walk away, know when to run."

One of the important questions to answer is "How do you 'center' and refocus on taking care of yourself?" If you can answer that question, you're on the way.
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Old 08-26-2019, 05:31 AM
 
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Just like the word bullying, anxiety and PTSD get used way too much.

WHile a year of teaching can be really stressful, I doubt that most of the situations most teachers go through really give them actual PTSD.

I do hope your year is better this year. It is a pity what so many youngsters have to deal with at such young ages.
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Old 08-27-2019, 08:07 AM
 
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Yes, it is definitely possible.

I retired after a long successful career. I was the teacher who always had a tough class. If kids needed structure they were put in my class. I handled rough classes by doing what needed to be done and doing it quietly, without complaining. The last year took a toll on me in many ways. I had already planned on retiring and enjoyed my last year even though I was completely physically exhausted at the end of every day.

If Iím around kids who exhibit certain behaviors I get anxious, shaky, my face gets flush, it is hard to breath, and my heart races. If Iím near it too long I will cry and feel like Iím having a nervous breakdown. I have a very quick physical response and I have no doubt that it is PTSD.

I am now careful about the situations I am in and will remove myself from areas where kids are behaving a certain way.

When you work with kids who experience trauma you can also experience what is called secondary trauma. You need to take care of yourself. Exercise, drink water, eat healthy, get plenty of sleep, do yoga, meditate. If you need to talk to your doctor or a therapist. It all helps to counteract secondary trauma and PTSD.

Yes, teachers can and do experience PTSD and secondary trauma.


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Teacherbee_4 Teacherbee_4 is offline
 
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Same!
Old 08-27-2019, 03:11 PM
 
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I had a super rough year last year with a really hard class and I still feel shaken up over it. Summer was not near long enough to recover from it.
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70Primrose 70Primrose is offline
 
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Thank you!
Old 08-27-2019, 08:22 PM
 
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I am feeling that way! I do see a counselor and I am on anxiety meds. Have been on meds for years even before teaching, but I feel worse lately. I had my doc up my dose about two weeks ago because of the spike going back to work. I hope it kicks in soon!
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I think that
Old 08-28-2019, 12:07 PM
 
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many of our students experiences can affect us and over time bring us down. I think PTSD is a bit of a stretch because for a teacher, it's more like second or third hand trauma. I have friends who have worked with pediatric patients in oncology. After a few years they had to transfer to another field because it was difficult emotionally.
It's especially important to include the things that help us heal such as exercise, being out in nature and being with upbeat, positive friends. For many, faith is a very important component.
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