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Several ADHD students and one autistic
Old 04-24-2019, 03:54 PM
 
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Iím doing a long term sub in 3rd grade til the last day.
I have 17 students and most are good and try. Also have about 5 that are ADHD not on meds and one autistic.
The teacher has the clip system where they clip up or down
Some of the students come in and do exactly what theyíre supposed to do and they get clipped up right away. If they keep the clipped up status they are alphas and rewarded with candy. She has the wolf theme in her room.
There is a lot of drama and they feed off each other, not good chemistry.
Iím on my second week and really need to make this work because I need the money to get caught up on my bills.
The autistic boy is doing great he loves being an alpha and getting the candy.
Itís the rest of them. Iíve had screaming and crying daily.
Iím doing the reading and social studies and get a second group in the afternoon who are a lot better. There are a few characters in there but nothing like my morning home room group
Do you guys have any tips or pearls of wisdom to deal with this, calming techniques etc.


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Old 04-24-2019, 08:21 PM
 
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I absolutely hate the clip system, but the lower grades use it, so of course I have to abide by it. How in the world is the teacher getting away with rewarding the kids with candy? Clipping up is supposed to be the reward in that wonderful system. Yeesh.

You may be dealing with poor classroom management from the teacher the kids have had all year, or it could be a bad combination of kids in that first group. I would say youíre going to have to get compliance first, and that may temporarily come at the expense of the curriculum.


Think about what triggers the drama. Maybe you could have a come to Jesus meeting with the offenders and do some role-playing regarding how to talk to one another. Not sure how to get across what Iím trying to say, but it could be sort of a counseling meeting.


One of the most effective things I ever did was to pull a group of 5 kids every dadgum day at lunch, gah! Iíd mix it up by drawing popsicle sticks w/ their names on them, so the groups were never the same mix of kids. It became a real thing, eating lunch with me. I gave myself Fridays off, so I could eat in peace, lol.


What worked was that we all got to know each other on a personal level, and the kids would tell things in that small group that they never would have told me otherwise. Win the troublemakers over to your side by getting to know them. Find something theyíre interested in, and have a conversation with them about it.


The other thing that Iíve found that is calming is to set a Pandora station on ď classical music for studyingĒ and have it playing softly when the kids first come in and also when theyíre doing independent work. It really helps.


Hopefully some of this makes sense, as Iíve just been typing random thoughts here right before I call it a night. Good luck, and hang in there, elepen!
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Old 04-25-2019, 03:40 AM
 
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Thank you Mooba 1
The big trigger in the room is one boy who has severe ADHD. He is all over the room touching things and saying things to students. Yelling that everyone hates him.
Then you have the group who are the good citizens through out the chaos I always thank them and praise them. I've had one really good morning in the 2 weeks I've been there. 5 more to go, last day May 31
I questioned the candy too.
I'm probably have another class meeting to go over rules and procedures. I thought of the classical music too
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Old 04-25-2019, 07:44 AM
 
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I would also have a convo with the worst offender and find out what strategies he used with regular teacher. What time of day/ activities are worse for them? Try giving alternate seating, working with a peer, smaller chunks on assignment, checking in more often, maybe even a checkin for behavior in much smaller time increments. Remind them with a firm touch on shoulder or a secret signal of what needs done, or is working well.

Maybe in your class discussion you can find out what worked for those students without saying you need help with them specifically. Could the class tell you what strategies they use to get work done and follow class procedures?

Find me a class that doesn’t have 5 unmediated adhd any more...

Is the clip chart school driven? Could you implement something new like dojo to them for the remainder of the year?
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Old 04-25-2019, 12:48 PM
 
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Thank you Kahluablast good ideas


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Old 04-25-2019, 01:16 PM
 
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It sounds as if your major concern is this one student. We all know one student can make or break a room

Here is some of my advice as a special educator with a concentration in AD/HD (and most strategies will work with many students).

Place the student away from distractions as best you can. Generally that means they are closer to an adult at all times.

Prepare them for a transition - say things like, "In 2 minutes we will move from reading to math." This gives them time to adjust and prepare their minds and bodies.

Make time for movement. Children with AD/HD need to have movement breaks. You could send this student to the office with a note that says "Read, pretend to write something, then return student and note to class #1234" . This gives them a purpose and movement break. If the students need to sit for long stretches, let this student get up to get a drink, bathroom, run errand....etc.

Ask the question "Student A, are you making a good or bad choice?"

Visual reminders when you can such as writing the schedule on the board
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:16 PM
 
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Thank you Tea Break
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Old 04-26-2019, 02:10 PM
 
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Acknowledging that you have to be careful... I tend to ignore inappropriate behavior and make it clear that I don't have time for it. I'll acknowledge when a kid is upset and suggest they find a place and way to get calm. In some cases, I'll offer help. "How can I help you fix this?" I think we spend too much energy trying to "fix" drama. "I'm here to teach, you are here to learn."

In a long term situation, I'd be inclined to create a quiet corner where a student can go on their own to just get grounded. The key is, I think, to make them responsible for their own behavior. I find in third grade it becomes critical to reinforce "worry about yourself." A student who tattles gets challenged to solve the problem. When the chemistry is wrong, I'll point out what is unacceptable and ask the students how they plan to fix it, hinting that they probably won't like my solution.

I think too often the kids are outmanaging us and making us solve the problems they create, sometimes by their own inflexibility. They want us to change the behavior of others instead of them figuring out how to solve THEIR problem. Just today I had a third grader pitch a major fit because somebody had the chair she wanted. Gee, maybe you just need to want a different chair? (Not too used to getting your own way, are you, little one?)

Can we differently empower kids to work for themselves instead of a piece of candy?
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Old 04-27-2019, 04:08 PM
 
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I know Maine Sub and I usually ignore that type of behavior.
I was told by the 3rd grade chair that she’s glad I stayed and am doing a good job with the worse class in 3rd grade. It’s the chemistry of the children.

I also Found out that this was offered to 2 subs who turned it down
Five more weeks to go. The plus is a great team and teaching partner
Thank God for Zoloft and not being a Hormone hostage

Last edited by elepen; 04-27-2019 at 04:30 PM..
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