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Would you...
Old 06-08-2019, 06:36 PM
 
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leave a 24-year job in a stressful school run by ineffective admin for a job in another district losing all seniority and a little bit of pay, but have a decrease in stress and a better, more effective supportive principal?

Just curious...


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Old 06-08-2019, 06:42 PM
 
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Retirement benefits the same? Does seniority simply mean that you will be on the bottom of the staffing, so if positions are cut you would be first to go? How close are you to retirement?

That probably would be my biggest concern. With 24 years in, you don't want to start over. Do you know how the new district handles hires at the end of the year? Do they typically non renew, or is it more or less based on performance? My district (my school, anyway) in all my years, we haven't had any teachers that were nonrenewed for performance. It is always based on how the numbers shake out for the next year and class staffing. So, if it is typically like that, I might be tempted as long as I would still have a similar time till retirement.
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Iíd stay
Old 06-09-2019, 03:41 AM
 
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Many of my colleagues are in a similar position, and they are all sticking it out. Ps come and go, but thereís a lot to be said for job security (does your state have tenure?)

How many more years until you are eligible for retirement?

Good luck with your decision!
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Old 06-09-2019, 04:28 AM
 
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At 24 years I would probably stay. And how do you know for sure that the grass will really be greener at the other school? I had a teammate who left a district that was a hot mess at the time to come to my district. She took a pay cut and lost seniority as she had 19 years in. At first, it was worth it and she was very happy at my school. Previous P and AP absolutely loved her and she had a lot of influence.

After 4 years, we got a new P. New P didn't get along with her at all and ended up non-renewing her. Thankfully, because she's in a highly specialized position, she was able to find another job, but now she's starting over AGAIN, and things in her original district have calmed down considerably. She admitted she'd wished she'd just waited it out and even applied there again this time.

I would also consider your retirement income and job security. What if your position at the new school ends up being cut? Around here, it would be very difficult for someone with 24 years of experience to find a new job.

Even if you have some way of knowing for sure that this P is great, you don't know how long that P will stay at the school. What if he or she is replaced with someone who is horrible? What if the district starts new policies you hate, or what if you end up with difficult teammates or don't click with the staff, or end up with more difficult students or parents than you have now? For me, there are just way too many factors to throw away non-probationary status, especially at 24 years!
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Old 06-09-2019, 04:55 AM
 
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With 24 years in I would stay. I would not risk my retirement on getting along with a new P. (I need 30 years to get full retirement.)

I would try for a third option, leaving my school but staying in my district.


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Old 06-09-2019, 06:07 AM
 
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Well, if youíre staying in the same state, retirement wouldnít be affected to much because youíre still paying into the same retirement system.

But youíre still losing seniority and starting at the bottom of the food chain, so to speak. With 24 years in how many more until retirement? Iíd have to think less than 10. Iíd probably wait it out. Personally, Iíve never had a principal last more than 3 years so...
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Little thought experiement
Old 06-09-2019, 06:08 AM
 
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This really depends on your outlook/personality.

This is why.

Principal's come and go. Districts do new whims at a drop if a hat.

This principal could be looking for a new job. His spouse/partner could be looking. There is no guarantee the person will be there next year.

Teaching has ratty kids, ratty coworkers, ratty administrations, and ratty parents. Sometimes you get all four piles or just ratty kids. Lol..

IF you had wrote, my 90 minute drive would be 20. It would be less of a hassle for day care issues. My aging parents live 5 minutes away from the school, I'd say spin the wheel as long as your retirement/pension follow you.

You really need to what if this...

IF this principal booms out for fab job, and I get Principal Garbage who only wants young, blonde and gullible, and the pot boiling starts...

District mandates a whole bunch of stuff that makes me do a KILL.ME.NOW...

Principal Garbage decides to toss the veterans to all day kindergarten, and you have zip seniority...could you do it? I know a principal who punted to 60 something teachers with sketchy knees and hips to all day kindergarten, and loaded their class with difficult students.

Are you the type that can go with the flow? You could have a wonderful 6 years or 6 years of napalm. Some people can deal with the napalm and learn to dodge it.

On the OTHER side...

How bad is the current tire fire? Sometimes a jump from tire fire to dumpster fire is worth it.

I'll be honest. If I didn't take a huge hit on the pension/benefits, I'd go. BUT I have a thick skin, easy going personality. The current kitchen is burning, but this new one isn't. Even if the new one does, it's a different view.

I have left jobs with a decent amount of seniority, and nothing lined up. It was going to morph into a murder/suicide if I didn't bail. Are you exploring or have a hard offer? The choice comes down to your personality and money concerns.

Exploring? I'd find out what they have to say.
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More details...
Old 06-09-2019, 04:32 PM
 
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Nothing has happened, yet, so this is all "what if". I do know that the principal at the other school I applied to has asked a mutual friend at her school about me.

I sent the following to kahluablast earlier, but I'll share it here, too. I did change a few minor things in case I have co-workers lurking on here.

My district is a high performing school, and we are pressured by our school board a lot. The Board, in my opinion, has too much power and basically goes beyond its role. WAY beyond.

My principal is an arrogant man who thinks he knows everything, but is truly so ineffective, that our school counselor and admin assistant are really running the show and doing his job.

Parents are incredibly demanding, but I'm fortunate that they're nothing like the parents Angelo deals with!

The morale at my school is incredibly low, stress is really high, and I have a close colleague that's driving me nuts with all the drama. Basically, I'm mentally in a bad place and these people are all driving me CUH-RAZY!!

I've talked to seven different people about the district I applied to. Three are current teachers, two are former teachers, one is a parent of kids that go to the school, and the last one in my current school counselor. They all agree that the principal, while blunt, is amazing to work for, and that she really supports the teachers. They tell me that the staff has little to no bull#### or drama. I've also been watching their Facebook page, and I'm so amazed at the sense of "community" I feel when looking at their posts. My district feels broken.

IF I were actually hired I'd lose about 6K in pay, but my DH and I are in a place to be okay with that. I'd lose my 150+ sick days that I've accumulated, but 20 days could be transferred over once I've gotten a continuing contract. We're all on the same state retirement, no matter what school district, so basically everything would be the same.

IF I got hired, the upside would be less stress, the other school district pays more of the health care, (I pay 15% now, but in the new district it would be only 8%), and I can keep my current doctors. I would also be working with a principal and assistant principal that I've heard glowing reviews about, as well as a strong team.

I'm not sure about reduction in force and such, because I haven't even been asked to be interviewed. I'm being absolutely ridiculous to be even stressing out over all these things, but I'm thinking of all the variables..."just in case".
Chances that they would even call me for an interview is slim to none, because I'm too expensive.


Thank you all for your responses! I so appreciate it!
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:36 PM
 
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Quote:
I'm being absolutely ridiculous to be even stressing out over all these things, but I'm thinking of all the variables..."just in case".
You're not being ridiculous! It's always good to be prepared for every scenario. You may have to make a quick decision with no time to weigh the pros and cons. Now you will be ready!
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Old 06-09-2019, 09:07 PM
 
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Change freaks me out, even when it is good change. With 24 years, Iíd stay out until retirement.


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Old 06-10-2019, 02:55 AM
 
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Quote:
You're not being ridiculous! It's always good to be prepared for every scenario. You may have to make a quick decision with no time to weigh the pros and cons. Now you will be ready!
I agree!

Which commute is better?
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It depends...
Old 06-10-2019, 04:09 AM
 
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Because of where my head, heart, body (and age) is... I would say "yes!" before you finished the question.

But it's a very individual answer. I see a lot of good thoughts in the thread... and while it seems to get more complicated, looking at those factors is important.

I think it's ultimately a question about what you are going to value the most... and that can be difficult because values can certainly shift. We also tend to overvalue the things we don't have. "The grass is always greener..."

It's also important to remember that the one thing you can be sure of is change. This sort of decision-making is not exactly science, it's art.

Flip a coin? That sounds crazy but the deal is you have to pay attention to how you feel with the result. If you're disappointed, your intuition (undervalued in Western cultures) may be telling you something.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:09 AM
 
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There are too many what ifs to make this a good move. The lay off scenario happened to me many years ago when I made such a move. Before I agreed to move I asked the admin about the possibility of lay offs and he straight up told me " we don't lay off our teachers." Within one year I was laid off due to low enrollment, seniority and budget issues in the district. Now this worked out for me later and I was hired back in late summer but it took me years to climb the seniority ladder. The U.S. economy and the economy of many states is so unpredictable. I wouldn't take that risk if I were you. Instead I would explore ways to avoid stress at work.
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Tempting but...
Old 06-10-2019, 09:53 AM
 
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150+ sick days are a lot to lose. Can you cash them out at retirement? Or is it an incentive to have them at retirement? Meaning you donít lose them, right? Thatís a lot of money to consider losing in addition to the yearly salary pay cut. Just a thought...
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:00 AM
 
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We can only cash in 30-40 days when we retire, and if I were to go to the other district, I would have that by the time I officially retired.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:14 PM
 
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Having such a large amount of sick days can help should something catastrophic happen . 150 sick days is a large asset.
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