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Retaliation
Old 07-24-2019, 10:44 AM
 
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I am just second guessing my decision and was wondering what you all think. Last school year a couple of my students informed me that another teacher in the school had told some Hispanic students to stop speaking Spanish or go back to their country. Of course I was outraged. These students are straight A students with no discipline problem and they were just present in the class. They said the whole class made up of diverse students gasped when she made that comment. I told the principal and gave the students' names but told them neither I nor the students wanted to be identified to that teacher. The principal made the comment " i understand about the Spanish thing" but not about the other comment. At that point I was more outraged and disappointed. I made sure I asked the 2 students and they said the Spanish conversation was not part of class assignment rather a private conversation the students were having. Now, i am not sure if they were talking when they weren't supposed to but that is beside the point because that warrants it's own consequence. Weeks went by and Principal never called in the 2 students to get their side of the story. The teacher never apologized and she is still employed. Well this really bothered me but I chose not to say anything because it was my first year as probationary contract.

This has been bugging me all summer and felt not enough was done. So I wrote the president of the school board but mentioned no names and told him I just wanted an awareness that this was not tolerable at the district. I suggested for him to recommend a cultural awareness training or memo. Well he asked me to call him and wanted to know the name of school and teacher. I told him and he said he would make a couple of calls and inform the superintendent. He said normally he would advice me to follow the chain of command but that this was especially disturbing.
Teachers go back to work in 2 weeks. I am a little worried there will be retaliation by the principal or that teacher who is a veteran teacher of many years. Do you think I did the right thing? I mean in my mind I could have gone to the media if I wanted to cause a scandal but that was not my intent at all. I just wanted there to be a consequence, an awareness, and a sense that kids are not treated unfairly.


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Old 07-24-2019, 11:22 AM
 
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I think itís great that your superintendent acted immediately. Honestly, YOU were not the one that said anything inappropriate, so you have no need to feel bad about what you did.

Are you in a union state? If so, I would contact your rep. Most places have rules against retaliation (but you know it still happens).

For what itís worth, you did the right thing. Youíd like to hope the teacher was just ignorant or made a slip- it would have been nice if the P did something before raising it to the next level. But, he/she was given that opportunity.
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:36 AM
 
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UVAgrl928,
I don't know what the superintendent did or will do. The person I informed was the school board member, and he told me he would make a couple of calls and inform the superintendent. I don't know if they have even spoken to the teacher in question since we are still on summer break.
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:47 AM
 
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Hopefully it will be handled as "we all need to work on this" vs. "So-and-So tattled on a colleague and principal".

I'm not sure I would have done it, just because I like to fly under the radar.

I also wonder if it was "Don't speak Spanish in my classroom because I hate Mexicans" vs. "It's not polite to speak a foreign language around people who can't understand you", which is a slightly different thing.
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Bad Situation
Old 07-24-2019, 12:18 PM
 
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That is a terrible thing to say to those students, however I would not intervene unless I heard it myself. Throughout my years of teaching I heard teachers say things that I would never say, but did not intervene. If you told the principal and superintendent I would let it go.


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Old 07-24-2019, 01:03 PM
 
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I also wonder if it was "Don't speak Spanish in my classroom because I hate Mexicans" vs. "It's not polite to speak a foreign language around people who can't understand you", which is a slightly different thing.
The "or go back to your country" remark is sort of a dead giveaway as to which thing it is .... IF the teacher actually did say that. Students will sometimes embellish what happened and it's also human nature to remember things that you infer as being things that were spoken.

The unfortunate truth is that, yes, you did the right thing but yes, there very easily could be retaliation. I probably would have told these students that they should talk to their parents about it and that their parents should bring it to the school board. In my experience, school boards don't really care what teachers think but they definitely do care what parents think.
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Old 07-24-2019, 01:48 PM
 
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Unfortunately, yeah I've been in this exact situation. However, I had the fortune of having a higher-up (not admin, but may as well have been) in the room when it was said. I've taught ESL for 8 years and a couple of years ago, a teacher was in my room observing with our bilingual coordinator and counselor. A group of my students talked almost solely in Spanish and the teacher turned to them and told them "This is America, you need to speak English in this classroom." The kids immediately turned to me, I told them they were fine speaking Spanish as long as they stayed on task (I know enough Spanish to know if they're off task.)

The teacher that said that was LIVID with me and ranted about it in the lounge later. Thankfully the other staff members that heard it went to the principal before I could and that teacher was reprimanded.

As to your situation - I would hope your P and that teacher take this as a learning opportunity and not a chance for retaliation. I'm with others that suggest if you have a Union you need to get with them as a precaution.
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Old 07-24-2019, 03:26 PM
 
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Yea- some cultural sensitivity training definitely needs to be done. Iíve been to a lot of training where theyíve said allow students to speak in their native tongue, even if itís not on task. I canít tell you how much I rely on my Spanish speaking students for help. Iíve even sought out students in other grades to come speak to my students in their native tongue if I donít have students that speak that language (for example- German).

Is your district not very diverse?
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I have a bit of a different take on this...
Old 07-24-2019, 03:41 PM
 
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Did you go to the teacher and even ask her if she had said it? If she did say it, you did what you needed to do.
Over many yrs, I have had kids lie to me about other teachers and vice versa. Sometimes, there is some truth to part of it , other times the kid just misunderstood or misperceived what was said. Then there are a few devious kids who would love to get a teacher in trouble.
Once I had a kid who told a pull out teacher something I never even remotely said. She got all upset, never said a word to me, and made a huge deal out of it w/ admin when there was no truth to it. After SHTF, with lots of people involved, I had admin go into my class and not 1 other student said anything remotely close to what the kid had told the pull out teacher. ( It took me a long time, but I finally realized the kid had confused different events/ conversations. Plus, he was the type that liked to stir people up. He had this pull out teacher's undivided attention and milked it.)
Also, I have seen 1 man get falsely accused of sexual abuse ( we have cameras) that showed it could not have happened where/ how the kid said. He was a very good man, but the kid was mad at him and knew it was a way to get him fired. ( The kid had been sexually abused before at home and knew how the system worked.) After an investigation, the kid admitted he just wanted to get the teacher in trouble.
Being a new teacher, you need to keep in mind that not everything kids tell you is the truth. Your 1st stop when you are concerned about something should be to the teacher in most cases. After my experience with it and what I have seen happen to others over the yrs, it really irks me when teachers automatically believe students and do not bother to ask the teacher. I can understand how easily it would be to believe the student as a first yr teacher, but you need to know any accusations might fly against you at anytime too. Would you want the other teacher to talk to you first?
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Old 07-24-2019, 03:49 PM
 
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lean towards what Summer said. I would have asked the teacher first. If I was not at peace, then I would approach the principal. You do not know for sure whether or not the P addressed it with the teacher.



My town just made local headlines from and altercation she said happened. She accused a man of saying politically motivated statements. Turns out, things are not looking the way she claimed.
This year I had a student make up lies about me getting in a fight with another teacher. She went to the counselor and AP. She was very convincing. I was pulled in the office. My AP discussed the allegations and he found the lie untrue. No one knew about this. It was not advertised.


I hope things go ok for you, but I think, you could have some push back. I hope not, but it is possible.


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Old 07-24-2019, 04:16 PM
 
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Summerwillcom,

No I didn't approach the teacher in question because first of all I did not feel comfortable causing a confrontation and it was not my place in my opinion but rather the principal's.

Do I know 100% sure that the kids were telling the truth? Of course not because I wasn't there, but these are high school kids so they know what they hear. The 2 students that came to me are straight A students and very well behaved kids. They were not the kids the teacher directed the comment to but were in class and their comments were "even the white students gasped when she said that". Also I urged them to go on their own or tell their parents, but they didn't want to get involved and one of them even told me he didn't want the teacher to be fired. When I told him that I didn't understand why the principal didn't call them in, the boy said "it's probably because he is white". So I got the feeling they were telling the truth and felt helpless. If they were being malicious and manipulative they would have gone themselves when I urged them to.

The school is about 55% hispanic, about 15% black about 5%asiand and about 25% white, but most of the administration is white.
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Old 07-24-2019, 09:13 PM
 
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First, follow the Golden Rule. Treat others the way you would want to be treated. How would you feel if the shoe was on the other foot? What if a student went to another teacher and spoke negatively about you or said that you did something like that? Would you want that teacher to go to the principal or school board without speaking to you to verify whether or not the incident actually took place? You did not witness the incident and don't know all the details. Everything you say is hearsay. Even well-behaved straight A students could have misheard what was said or misinterpreted the situation.

Second, follow district protocols and the chain of command that are in place. They are there for a reason. You don't know that the principal did not investigate. Keep in mind that you only know one side of the story.

In the future, you would be wise to go directly to the person-not behind their back. It is so unfair to that person. Follow the chain of command. While I think your intent was coming from the right place, you didn't handle it well. You also have to be careful about perpetuating stories that have not been verified.

Many years ago, a male teacher I know was accused of inappropriately touching several girls. He was immediately removed from the classroom. His picture splashed on the front cover of the local newspaper and TV. When it was investigated by the police, the charges were unfounded. The girls later confessed that they made it up because they were mad at him. He wouldn't let them leave class early before the bell rang. That man was a dedicated teacher with an excellent reputation. He went through hell and back to clear his name. By the way, those three girls were straight A students and not known to be discipline problems. The local news and TV never reported that the three girls confessed that they lied. Nothing happened to the three girls. He was never the same after that.
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Retaliation
Old 07-24-2019, 09:22 PM
 
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I agree with iteachk2010. Even very good students sometimes lie or may misinterpret or embellish a teacher's comments. If true, the teacher's comments were reprehensible, but you were not present and so you don't know for sure what was said or not said. Innocent until proven guilty is the best policy. And you are neither judge nor jury.
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Old 07-24-2019, 09:39 PM
 
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iteachk2010,

First, I am not claiming that what the teacher is accused of saying is 100% true because I wasn't there. However, these students that told me this have absolutely nothing to gain from lying or embellishing what was said. They said the whole class heard it.

Second I would not confront a teacher with this because one, it's not my job but the principal's, and secondly I feel if teachers really did say it then they are going to lie about it. Plus another student that had this teacher in the past also told me that she was not nice to the ESL kids. That she would get frustrated with them and tell her Spanish speaking kid, "you deal with them".

Third my point is not that she is guilty rather that the principal did not call in my 2 student informants to get the first hand details. Why would you not talk to the kids making the accusation? Plus the principal told me "I understand about her telling them not to speak Spanish". Excuse me but that is not going to fly with me since kids have a constitutional right to speak whatever language they want.
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:12 PM
 
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I understand that your heart was in the right place. Also, I will freely admit that my first couple of years teaching, I probably believed students who lied about adults. Now I take most complaints with a grain of salt. I didn't go and tell on teachers though.
Looking back, kids tried to divide and conquer team teachers. My team teacher and I were best friends for many years, so we both talked freely about what kids said. That was a huge eye opener for me.
I tend to encourage kids to learn ways to handle problems on their own when possible instead of fixing or rescuing them. "A" students are capable of being good liars. I have known a few who were quite convincing. Hearsay is not heard in court for a reason. If the other teacher made those comments ( shame on her), but it would be the teenagers responsibility to tell their parents or admin if it bothered them. ( You did not hear her say it.) You may be very well convinced she did and maybe it is true. Teenagers need to know if something truly bothers them, they have the power to speak out. I'd be frustrated too though if a kid said, "It's probably because he's white." Anyways, it is good if your school gets some training in cultural sensitivity.
I think you will be facing "subtle retaliation" from some of the teachers and admin for going over their heads. However, if you have a good union, they won't be able to blatantly retaliate since you made it known to higher ups. Teaching is a unique profession in a lot of ways. You have to learn how to navigate through the system. It is not easy, I know. I do wish you the best and hope you understand the importance of encouraging kids to find solutions. Teens will be adults soon and many of their parents have not taught or encouraged them to speak out for themselves if the matter is of importance to them.
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Old 07-25-2019, 01:48 AM
 
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You should of stayed out of it unless you had first hand knowledge of it happening. Iíd be worried if I were you.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:03 AM
 
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You told the principal that your two students didn't want to be identified to the teacher. It stands to reason that the principal may have been able to figure out who the comments were directed to and talked to them.

Or the principal may have talked to other students in the class who he has a good rapport with who would tell him the truth. Or he may have talked to the teacher directly and not needed to bring in any students.Or a parent may have called him and he may have just spoken to that student and the teacher.

If you were so upset that you went to the school board, you should have talked to the principal first.

As others have said, you don't know what was actually said in class. It is very common for teens to misconstrue things. The teacher may have told them not to talk in Spanish, and then one of the students could've responded with, "Are you telling me I can't be in America if I talk in Spanish?" Or it could've been exactly as the students reported, but you don't know and it's not your place to figure it out.

I do think you need to be prepared for retaliation. If your principal did talk to the teacher, you completely undermined him.
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Old 07-25-2019, 05:25 AM
 
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Plus the principal told me "I understand about her telling them not to speak Spanish". Excuse me but that is not going to fly with me since kids have a constitutional right to speak whatever language they want.
I'm not sure this is true. First amendment rights are always somewhat curtailed in public schools. I haven't done the research but I suspect I'd find that it is constitutional to expect students to speak English in a class that's being conducted in English. What would be unconstitutional would be to not allow them to speak Spanish at school when they're outside of class. I live in an area where we have some Spanish-speaking students and also students who speak various Native languages and the rule is always English in the classroom. That's true even in reservation schools where Native languages are being actively promoted and taught in school. So a respectful request that students speak English so everyone can understand would be fine. Telling students to go back to their country...not fine (and would really open up a can of worms around here where there are generally going to be some Native kids in the class!) That being said, if I were teaching in a school that was 55% Hispanic I think I'd make it a priority to learn to speak Spanish.

The fact that all your administrators are white in a school that's 55% Hispanic does suggest that there might be some systemic racism in the school. The fact that the students who told you were not the same students who were told to quit speaking Spanish makes it more likely that they were telling the truth. I applaud your willingness to go out on a limb but know that it's very difficult to combat systemic racism in a school system. I sincerely hope you don't experience too much blow-back. If the school board president is on your side, that should help.
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Old 07-25-2019, 06:45 AM
 
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When you contact the president of the school board about an incident at your school you can absolutely expect blow-back from your P and the staff members. Your coworkers could reasonably lose trust in you and wonder what you'll report next time. You essentially reported that your school has an underlying racist culture that your P failed to address. No P is going to like the school board to hear that.

*
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The teacher never apologized and she is still employed.
Did you really expect this teacher to be fired based on this alleged comment? Was that your intent in making your "report"? Your coworkers would be wise to steer clear of you.

I've come to learn that kids (and adults) can misunderstand situations and filter them through their own biases. When you were not present to witness an incident it's wise to let your school administration deal with it. They know the students and teachers and you really don't know how they addressed the situation or what action they plan to take.

If the students were told to go back to their own country, that's appalling and should never happen. Your feelings are justified but be prepared for some blow-back due to the way you handled the situation.

Last edited by Renea; 07-25-2019 at 08:09 AM..
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Old 07-25-2019, 07:45 AM
 
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Renea,
My intent was not to get her fired but I did want there to be a consequence. I donít know if something was done but I truly believe she made those comments. If you have been hearing the news yes people have been getting fired from their jobs for saying things like this and if you donít think these comments are racist then I believe you (not you personally but in general) are racist.The school is in a small suburb that has its share of xenophobic and prejudiced adults that have no problem making vile comments about undocumented immigrants and other nationalist sentiments on social media. There have been 2 cases in the past few months of alleged police brutality against black residents. Yes I will not stay silent and let my students be mistreated.

I only mentioned she wasnít fired as an observation. I mention she didnít apologize to class because students told me nothing happened afterwards and itís an observation as well that leads me to question what the consequence was. Yes if it sounds like Iím telling the board that thereís systemic racism and principal didnít do his duty but in a way that is how I perceived it.

Most importantly I didnít mention names to the board president. He is the one that asked me and yes he is very understanding and gave me his cell phone number to give to kids if anything in the future like this happened. And yes he is the only Hispanic board member in board of 7 one other board member is black, 5 are white. This is in a district where almost 60% of students are Hispanic.
About 4 years ago, the district had a Hispanic superintendent. He did make changes in some administrators in terms of putting them in different schools. Well a sea of white parents and community members flooded the school board meeting and demanded they get rid if him. And the board did. The opinion of Hispanic parents and community members was not heard mostly because they didnít show up. The current Superintendent who is white was up for evaluation last summer. There was a rumor that a board member or 2 were questioning his work on progressand he would be voted out. Well again a group of mostly white parents protested at the board meeting and he was kept.
I am telling for background information. Take it as you want.
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A summary:
Old 07-25-2019, 11:24 AM
 
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FLteachFr: Do you think I did the right thing?

Renea: If the students were told to go back to their own country, that's appalling and should never happen. Your feelings are justified but be prepared for some blow-back due to the way you handled the situation.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:26 PM
 
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Second I would not confront a teacher with this because one, it's not my job but the principal's, and secondly I feel if teachers really did say it then they are going to lie about it.
Exactly. You said it yourself. It's the principal's job. It's time for you to step back and do your best with your own teaching. You may never know what happens, and that's fine. This is between the principal and the teacher.

Are you sure the board member gave out his phone number to the students? That's very unprofessional. Having private phone calls with students could get him in a lot of trouble.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:57 PM
 
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Are you sure the board member gave out his phone number to the students? That's very unprofessional. Having private phone calls with students could get him in a lot of trouble.
I don't think so. Around here, school board members' phone numbers and e-mail addresses are listed on the school web page. Students can voice concerns
directly to school board members although it's usually more effective if they go through their parents. School board members are elected officials. It's their job to make themselves available to the community. What kind of trouble do you imagine he would get into? I highly doubt he's going to be impeached or recalled for taking a phone call from a concerned student.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:39 PM
 
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If students have an issue, they can go to a teacher, the principal, their parents, but to go straight to a board member seems drastic and like it could create more problems than it's worth. I've known of several board members who don't have much clue about teaching at all, and involving them in a classroom situation like that would really be blowing things out of proportion.
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Old 07-25-2019, 04:07 PM
 
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First, I am not claiming that what the teacher is accused of saying is 100% true because I wasn't there. However, these students that told me this have absolutely nothing to gain from lying or embellishing what was said. They said the whole class heard it.
You are judging that teacher without having the full facts and after not witnessing the incident yourself. You do not have evidence-just hearsay. Iím not saying the students lied or embellished; however, students could have misheard or misinterpreted what they heard. You do not know what was going on in that class or what might have happened previously. I agree with another posterís comment that ďit's also human nature to remember things that you infer as being things that were spoken.Ē If, in fact, ďthe whole class heard itĒ, you would think that the other students would be talking about it, too. If so, then those students might have shared with their parents and their parents might have contacted the principal.

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Second I would not confront a teacher with this because one, it's not my job but the principal's, and secondly I feel if teachers really did say it then they are going to lie about it. Plus another student that had this teacher in the past also told me that she was not nice to the ESL kids. That she would get frustrated with them and tell her Spanish speaking kid, "you deal with them".
You are absolutely right that it is not your job, but you felt compelled to make it yours. You donít know that the principal didnít investigate. You assumed that there was no investigation because you didnít see action. The principal might have spoken with the Hispanic students, who were directly involved. He has no reason to discuss it with you due to confidentiality. You also donít know if there were no consequences for that teacher because that would be confidential, too.

You did not address it properly. You didnít follow established protocol or the chain of command. You first should have discussed it with the teacher. Discussed it-not saying you should have confronted the teacher or accused the teacher. You just assumed that the teachers would lie about it-just as you assumed that the students are not lying, embellishing, misinterpreting.

Quote:
Third my point is not that she is guilty rather that the principal did not call in my 2 student informants to get the first hand details. Why would you not talk to the kids making the accusation?
Again, not your job so you donít get to dictate how the investigation is run nor do you dictate the consequences. You donít know that the teacher didnít apologize to the Hispanic students. The principal might have spoken with the Hispanic students, who were directly involved. He has no reason to discuss it with you any further because you didnít witness it and due to confidentiality.


Quote:
And The teacher never apologized and she is still employed.
Sounds like you feel the teacher didnít get the consequence you felt she deserved. Again, that is not your job. You are new and need to familiarize yourself with school policy. Our policy manual is about 3 inches thick, but it provides strict guidelines for how different situations should be handled and what consequence is allowed for different offenses-everything from verbal reprimand, note in personnel file, required training, loss of step (can't move up to the next step on pay scale), suspension, immediate dismissal. The teacher might have been called in front of the school board and action taken, but details would not be public knowledge due to confidentiality rules.

I donít think there is anyone on PT who would condone that alleged comment or behavior. The issue is solely with the way you handled it. That is the bottom line. If you are in a union state, your union would have an issue with the way you handled it.
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Old 07-25-2019, 04:36 PM
 
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I've known of several board members who don't have much clue about teaching at all, and involving them in a classroom situation like that would really be blowing things out of proportion.
Well, if a student was told to "go back to her country" for speaking Spanish then it's really not a"classroom situation" is it? If there is a culture of racism in this school, who, precisely, should handle it if not the school board? If there is a culture of racism in this school, I would submit that you really can't "blow things out of proportion." Whether it's "worth it" or not probably depends on whether you are the victim of systemic racism or not.

And, your contention was that it was "unprofessional" for a school board member to give out his phone number and that he could "get in a lot of trouble." I guess you don't actually understand that in a public school, the school board is the final authority. If he chooses to fight this battle, it might cost him the next election, but he is certainly within his rights to make himself available.

It is a risky thing, indeed, for a teacher to ignore the chain of command and go directly and officially to the school board president. I, personally, wouldn't do it unless I was prepared to move on if it became necessary. But a school board member risks nothing by being willing to talk to students about it.
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Old 07-25-2019, 06:28 PM
 
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I guess you don't actually understand that in a public school, the school board is the final authority.
Fiesty, aren't you? Believe what you want. Thanks for sharing your opinion.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:59 PM
 
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You seem determined to out a teacher who you feel wasn't consequenced to your liking.

You really don't know that she wasn't spoken to or given a consequence! You just assume that since your kids weren't asked or spoken to, that the prince didnt handle the situation.
Maybe there is a history and the prince had to handle it a certain way, or maybe the principal did speak to the teacher without having to ascertain the validity because she knows this is soemthing the teacher did. And just because the teacher didnt apologize doesnt mean she wasnt spoken to about it.
By consequenced, this teacher could have had a verbal reprimand, or a written one.

You are not privy to know what consequence she was given. Sorry but it aint your business.

Also, you were wrong to say names to the school board head. If you feel that there is an issue at your school and wanted to share with him your observations of behavior- fine. But all you had in this situation- whether you feel the kids were honest or not was HERESAY not your own observable events. You should not have shared the heresay with names.
Also, you did break the chain of command and that was wrong. You should have gone to the superintendent if you felt so strongly about this. The super is your boss, not the school board. She/He should have been told not the school board member. The school board member also has to work in the "Sunshine" here in Florida. Which means their communications and conversations are not confidential but must be out in the open, or in the Sunshine. So I personally would not have a conversation where I felt I needed to get a teacher in trouble with a school board member.

I would have gone to the principal and left it at that. If I felt that this was a school wide issue, I would have gone and addressed the situation with the super- but i still would not have named names. I would give the situation as an example in general terms only.

Since you are in Florida, you should be in the union. Go talk to them. If you arent part of the union- go join now. If you are retaliated against, atleast you will have guidance with how to proceed form the union and they will be there as support.

And then from now on, before going anywhere with issues, you can ask their advice on how to do the right thing.

Secondly, if you are on annual contract as many are here in Florida, You should know that you can be dismissed at the end of the year without an explanation as to why. Just reminding you.

* signed out reg poster as Im on school computer.
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I'm not saying this is what happened
Old 07-27-2019, 07:56 AM
 
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And this is only my experience, but kids sometimes do significantly exaggerate things or even make things up whole-cloth, even when they have nothing to gain, for no other reason than to start drama.

From my experience, retaliation is a real possibility. It's not right, but it definitely could happen, especially of the principal got chewed out by the superintendent about this. Of course, it will be nearly impossible to prove and irrelevant even if you could because you're non-tenured.

Superiors don't like being told how they should be handling situations. I know that wasn't your intention, but that's how they typically see what you did.

As far as going to the media, doing that would have ruined this person's reputation for life if they ran a story. It would forever be the first result when somebody Googled them. I'm very skeptical about what kids say, like I said, but even if the person did say this, I don't think a person's entire career and reputation should be ruined for one stupid comment, but to each their own.
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I have thought about this
Old 07-27-2019, 09:15 AM
 
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for several days before posting. My experience when students tell a story about a teacher or another student is that there was usually a grain of truth somewhere, but that the context is not relayed in the telling. What led up to this? What was going on beforehand? During? Afterwards? What was said by each person present? Usually, large and pertinent chunks of the entire story were left out. That said, the students may have relayed the details accurately in this incident. Reporting it to the principal was the best thing to do.

It would be hard to know what the principal did due to confidentiality and the teacher involved would probably not mention this to anyone if they had been reprimanded. Confidence in your principals past record on confronting and solving problems would be a factor if I was deciding on what to do. (I once reported something to my principal and they flat out said they didnít believe me. I told them that they could discover the truth of the matter by showing up at a certain place at a specific time on Tuesday and Thursday. It continued for the rest of the school year which led me believe the principal did nothing. I lost confidence in that principal.)

As far as going to the school board member, i donít think that was a wise choice. You may suffer some repercussions as a result. Principals in my experience are very territorial and would resent this. Also, if word gets out among the faculty, some may be very unforgiving especially if they like the principal. Teachers have very long memories.

My advice if the principal approaches you about it would be to apologize profusely. I hope there is no retaliation, but if there is it may be done in such a way that it would not seem so to anyone else. Good luck.
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Uugghhh
Old 07-28-2019, 03:39 PM
 
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Uugghhh I hate the possibility that someone would even retaliate over this. It is COMPLETELY unacceptable to say something like that. How disgusting. Trumpís America, everyone. Sorry, rant off.

You did nothing wrong. I would be outraged too. I work in a heavily Hispanic populated area and have many strong relationships with our Hispanic families. I would rage if someone said that.
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I have to agree with IteachK2010
Old 07-31-2019, 06:55 PM
 
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If (And that is a huge ďIfĒ) the other teacher actually said both of those things that is reprehensible. However, you have zero proof that she actually said either of those things. It is all hearsay.

Then you did handle it incorrectly. You should have had a conversation with the other teacher. Iím not saying that you should confront her. Iím saying you should politely ask her about it. I have been teaching for over 30 years. Kids get things wrong. Good, well behaved kids with no reason to lie make mistakes. ďAĒ students get things wrong, have been known to cause drama, and bait teachers against each other.

If I worked with you I would not trust you because you listened to hearsay. You believed it because you apparently wanted to believe it. Apparently you have never heard of innocent until proven guilty. Then, you went to the principal. You should have left it there. The principal handled it. I am certain of that. There is the matter of confidentiality. Also, once you reported it, it was out of your hands. Maybe it wasnít handled to your satisfaction. But, it was handled. In fact, it could be that there was nothing to handle. Then you completely broke the chain of command by going to a School Board member. In my district that is called insubordination and it can earn you a severe reprimand.

Iím just SMH at all of this. If I had been as upset as you claim my first step would have been a conversation with the teacher. Iím certain your p has had a conversation with her. I just cannot understand why you didnít talk to her. You were willing to talk to you principal AND A BOARD MEMBER about her, but you were unable/ unwilling to talk to HER DIRECTLY. I donít get it.
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