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Oppositional Defiance Disorder
Old 09-14-2019, 04:08 PM
 
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I'm sorry to put this on the vent board, but the classroom management board doesn't get much participation, and I really am hoping for some words of wisdom!It has been an extremely trying start to the new school year.
I have a student who has no official diagnosis but is extremely defiant at times and has been since Kinder. Previous teachers tell me that nothing in particular worked for him. I am talking about vehemently refusing to do whatever the classroom activity is and then also refusing to do whatever the consequence given is.

He is also rude to the principal and to the outside playground aides, often refusing to comply with the aides' directions, as well.

I have never had a student so extreme in over 20 years in tough public education schools! Any thoughts on good ways to reach him and/or ways to de-escalate a situation when he takes a noncomplying stand? I feel it negatively impacts behavior with other students, too, who see him acting this way. Thanks!


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Odd
Old 09-14-2019, 04:31 PM
 
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Is child violent or prone to tantrums as well? Does he get locked in and is unable to break out of his behavior? These all are signs of ODD. If he’s just obstinate, she may or may not have ODD.

If he does, see if you can find the one thing he really likes to do. The child worked with loved to draw or just art projects. This was my bargaining chip with him.. I would make sure I added in art everyday so he had one thing to look forward to.

Also, I fought tooth and nail to get him a full time aid. Eventually they gave me a part time aid. It helped.
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:57 PM
 
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I had a student in a double period reading intervention group last year that was diagnosed with ODD along with other mental health diagnoses (PTSD, Attachment Disorder, Bipolar). He had a 1:1 aide, so that made things a lot easier because I included and managed him as best I could, but at a certain point she would step in and take him out of the room (or, more often, he would run out of the room and she would follow him).

There was a period of many months that my class was the only place he was successfully participating and completing work, not every day, but pretty consistently. Some of the things I did that I think helped: I picked my battles on small issues. There were some things he did that irritated me, but I let them go if that was better in the long wrong. I was specific and consistent about behaviors that were unacceptable, and then very calm and clear when those things happened.

For example, he would typically come to my room for group, get his book and go to his seat as expected. He might mutter on his way there, I'd ignore that. He may or may not do the work I asked him to do. If he didn't, but he was sitting and not bothering anyone else, I let it go. I would ask him to respond to questions or model an answer on the board so I could check if he was following along or able to do what I asked. Most of the time he would do that. Sometimes he wouldn't, and I would just call on someone else and we'd go on. If he left the table and I felt like I could "get him back", I'd reframe as a solution to a problem (because leaving the table to take a break is a healthier solution to being overwhelmed than dumping my table over and storming out) and then ask him to come back when he was ready. (Ex: I'd go to him, thank him for taking a break when he felt overwhelmed, ask if there was anything I could do to help him, and then tell him I'm hoping he'll come back when he's ready) If anything happened that even remotely threatened a student's safety, even as simple as leaning across and snatching materials from someone else, I'd be in my most firm and serious tone and tell him to leave the table immediately.

I genuinely liked the student despite the significant challenge he was to me and everyone else. I made sure to work on relationship building with him, and to be patient and calm at all times. I also always made sure to start each day (or instructional section sometimes!) with a clean slate for him. He knew I wanted him to do well and thought he was very bright and capable. I did not engage in power struggles with him. I would ignore behavior, have consistent expectations and also talk with him about us working together to help him. I also gave him control or decision making ability over things I felt I safely could (which is part of what I mean by ignoring behavior), because a lot of times the conflict comes from feeling out of control or a lack of power.

It took time to develop trust, and some days were better than others, but we were able to get to a point where it worked in our classroom.
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Old 09-14-2019, 06:36 PM
 
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I have a thread about ODD bookmarked, but I can’t seem to link it here. Click the magnifying glass at the top of this page, then click “advanced”. In the “topic” box, type ADHD ODD defiance.

That should pull up several threads, with the first one started by smurfyteach. Within that thread are several really helpful strategies that I’ve used with a couple of students.


I’m sure there’s an easier way to get to the thread, but you need someone more techie than me, lol. Good luck, these students can make you question your sanity, but they are reachable.
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Old 09-15-2019, 04:03 AM
 
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I had a child with odd. I found that giving him choices helped. For Example: Would you like to read at your seat or the table?” . It also helped to ask it in a question because it redirected his thinking and put him in control of the situation. It helped a lot to do this.


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Old 09-15-2019, 01:03 PM
 
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I had a student with ODD. The Child Study Team at my school scheduled a consultation visit with an ABA Behavior Specialist. A plan was devised that would enable the student to earn rewards based on his behavior, go to a quiet place when he needed to destress, and I was told to not "push" him to complete his lessons. Homework was something that was never completed! I had to grade him on what he completed in class. I had a hard time with this, as on some days it worked and on others I experienced a day from hell. About half way through year we made progress and the behavior improved. This was by far my most difficult year teaching but I did learn a lot about ABA.
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Old 09-15-2019, 05:40 PM
 
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Thank you all for your encouraging words and ideas. It is always nice to know we are not alone in experiencing difficult situations and trying to make the best of them. I appreciate that you took the time to respond to the original post!
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Find out what he
Old 09-15-2019, 05:59 PM
 
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Does like. Give him those things. Other kids ask why does he? You say "he needs to do that right now and you do not"

Poor kid

Video games
Playdoh
Modeling clay
Puzzles
Bubbles
Music on headphones
Tactile stuff

Opposition defiance is real. You can let kid come to you but if you approach them they hate it.

You wont be able to get through but you can manage with care.
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