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jnalowd jnalowd is offline
 
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What do you wish you learned in student teaching?
Old 11-08-2009, 05:07 PM
 
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Hi all! I have been teaching for 12 years and have my first
student teacher this year. She is in my classroom for two
days a week right now, but will be full time from Jan.-May.
I was wondering if there is anything you wish you learned
in student teaching and college that I could introduce to
my student teacher to help her make the transition from
college to her own classroom easier. I know there were many
things I wish I knew before I got my first classroom. Thank
you for all your ideas!


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I wish...
Old 11-09-2009, 01:21 PM
 
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someone would have shown me how to plan out my year. Like, look at the course of study, figure out what needs to come before what, and plan out my year. This is my first year teaching, and I was completely lost on where to start. In student teaching, yes, you had to plan out a unit, but (for me at least) the topic was usually decided for me. The teacher just told me what she usually taught during that time, and that's how I decided what to do.

Show her how you stay organized. That's another thing I was lost on. I had NO IDEA where to put things! Even if she doesn't like your way, at least it'll give her a jumping off point. I had no idea how any of my previous cooperating teachers had kept all of their materials.

Those are the main things I can think of right now. Have fun! I loved student teaching!
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Old 11-09-2009, 01:27 PM
 
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Trends in teaching she may have to deal with.
i.e. I had no idea what RtI was until it made my life a living you know what.

Classroom Management
They say they can't teach you, btu I think they could stand to share some strategies!
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:38 PM
 
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Best Practices (even if the district doesn't use them) like Readers and Writers Workshop Model. Knowing this opens doors to getting interviews!
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Maybe silly, but...
Old 11-10-2009, 05:23 PM
 
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How about things like setting up parent contact logs, documentation for students, and a paper gradebook (if you still do that...I'm a dinosaur in that respect!). I had the worst time getting stuff like that figured out when I started 11 years ago, and I still find myself changing up what I want to do...Good luck with the Student teacher!


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I suggest
Old 11-10-2009, 10:39 PM
 
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that since she will be coming to you full time in January that you help her organize what she will do to start the year. It may sound strange but that first week or so was AWFUL! No one ever teaches you how to keep students you know little about, occupied for all those hours. Then there is all the beginning of the year stuff and just getting ready. She will graduate in May and so her first job will probably not start until the beginning of the school year. Even if you offer to be available in the fall for anything she may need that would be a help. My clinical teacher was so much help getting me ready - she looked over my rules and discipline plans. Made suggestions and helped me organize my first week - which helped - it will still be rough, but at least she would be "armed".
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Old 11-11-2009, 12:02 PM
 
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I would suggest how to plan the year, this is my second year and I am still lost as to what to teach when. I don't have a set curriculum, so I can't just look at TE's to plan my year.
I also wish I had known what to do the first week of school and how to get all the beginning of the year assessments done. I also wish I had known how to set up and manage small groups and centers. I also wish I had known how to effectively differentiate my lessons for everyone (I teach a combined class and have kids everywhere on the spectrum).
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Amen
Old 11-12-2009, 07:02 PM
 
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ms gteacher! Well said!
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Old 11-17-2009, 10:38 PM
 
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i agree with all the above.

my mentor teacher also had me sit in on parent teacher conferences -- both the yearly conferences, and meetings she had with parents throughout the year to discuss behavior/academic issues, she also encouraged me to come to curriculum nights and after-school activities (family math night, etc.). that helped me a LOT in working with parents my first year as that's something we did not practice in my masters' program.
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organization
Old 11-22-2009, 04:39 PM
 
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I am a first year teacher in third grade. We are not self contained so I have 3 classes that I teach writing and social studies to. About 60 kids total. I find that the area I wish I had learned about was how to keep all of these papers organized. Which class is the student in, what papers have been graded, how to keep up with papers that I have given back to students and asked them to return to me, and all of that grade book stuff.

It is so hard keeping up with that! I end up with piles of papers and I have to try to remember which class they are in, have I added it to their average yet? What were they supposed to change and correct? How do I organize all of this?


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Old 11-23-2009, 03:13 PM
 
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I'm just finishing up student teaching. I'd say the biggest thing I wish I had learned was classroom management. At my university we didn't even get a course on classroom management until our final semester. The course was helpful, but I wish it had come before we started our internship and student teaching in the public schools.

Another thing I wish I had learned in college was about special ed students. There was NO course at all on special ed students, so it is very difficult for me to know what to do with the special ed students who are in our class. We got a little info about special ed in an early childhood class, but we never had an entire class on it. I wish I had learned about the laws, IEP's, ect.
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Old 11-23-2009, 03:26 PM
 
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Classroom management
Organization
Special Ed rules and laws
How to start a year---this was HUGE for me. I had no idea and most new teachers don't because they get to the classroom after it's up and running. I student taught in the fall semester, but still did not get there until after the kids had started. I thought I would die with all I had to do. It's still overwhelming every year and I've been doing it 15 years
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Year Plan
Old 11-23-2009, 04:49 PM
 
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I am also a first year teacher, and I was completely overwhelmed when I was given a ton of text books and curriculum framework. I still am lost and slightly all over the place just kinda planning week by week. I had the best classroom teacher ever..but I never bothered to ask her how she planned for the year. I now wish I would have!

Good luck!
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great ideas!
Old 12-02-2009, 12:16 PM
 
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All of the above are so great there isn't really anything to add! Classroom management is something that reading about and learning about doesn't help until you have to put it into action. Helping your student teacher test the waters is helpful. You never know what works for you until you try it! Explain why your CM plan works or doesn't work....what have you tried in the past that worked or failed and why. Also anything you can pass on about organization and planning is always helpful. Have your student teacher pick the brains of other teacher in other grades as well. Everyone is different and it gives them a broader scope for what might work for them.

Also at least in my experience college doesn't really teach you as much as you need to know about the various types of curriculum the state uses, but also ways to make that curriculum work for you so you don't get sick of it.

I had a great student teaching exp compared to some of my friends so these were things I got that they didn't.

Pass on anything that may also help in an interview. Have her practice interviewing with you, ask hard questions that principals would ask then critique her on her answers. This is something I wish someone had helped me with. Learning what to do after you get a job is great...but learning how to get that job is helpful too.

Good luck and enjoy your student teacher.
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sure
Old 12-03-2009, 05:33 AM
 
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I am 6th year and being encouraged to take my first student teacher. I totally agree about showing her how to make year plans with the "end in mind." Teach her the meaning of confidentiality required in our profession. Teacher her that we treat ALL school staff with dignity and respect.

I had one really lousy CO and one amazing CO and the latter is the one I model myself after. Too bad it is not September in that she could learn the value of putting into place all the rules, routines and procedures that run a successful classroom. She needs to be viewing you as a teacher who loves her kids and has fun with them but with decorum and respect for you.

There is so much! I think you should treat her as a colleague and introduce her to all staff. Have high expectations of her and teach her to believe in herself.

I base my whole philosophy on a quote by Henry Ford, "If you think you can, you can. If you think you can't... you're right!" Inspire her with your own mission statement as a teacher... give her all the supplies and books she needs and don't expect her to reinvent the wheel. You sound like you really want the best for her and your students so I know that you will all come out better people for the experience. God bless.
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I wish I had known:
Old 12-14-2009, 07:42 PM
 
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I wish student teaching could start on the first day of school. So many programs have you do it after the holdiay break. By this time, students are well established in their routines, discipline system, etc. The hardest part for me this year (my first year) was establishing these things. I had never seen in done before, so I had no idea how to do it the best way. I guess it is good to live and learn from your mistakes to, but I wish I had more knowledge in that area.

One thing my CT did help me with tremdenously was technology. She showed me all the tricks to the smartboard and how to make presentations and lessons. Now I am showing other teachers how to do things, even though it is my first year. Thanks to my C.T.
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Harry Wong
Old 12-24-2009, 10:23 PM
 
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The one thing I would show her is Harry Wong's book The First Days of School. I love that book. It talks about establishing and teaching procedures.

Classroom Management
First week of school
Organization
Documentation parent contact, student behavior/academic notes.
Special ed - especially ADD, autistic
Teacher books/resources - teacher/student websites
State standards
How to conduct parent conferences/dealing with unruly parents
Differentiated instruction
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Agreed!
Old 01-06-2010, 08:37 AM
 
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This is my first year teaching. Like everyone else mentioned above, I had never seen the first few days of school because college doesn't start until after the younger ones do. I read Harry Wong's book and it helped a ton!

I had a great student teaching experience. I had two teachers, who were very different. I learned many things that I liked and some that I didn't. When I started my student teaching, I got an egg crate contaniner and I put files in it. I filed everything I was given and I have used a lot of it. The one thing that I loved most about student teaching was the talks that my host teacher and I had after school. I asked her all kinds of questions. Also, she eased me into things but eventually (in my full time teaching- last two weeks) I contacted a parent about bad behavior. She was by my side and I was nervous. Buttt I was so glad she taught me things like that because the first time I did it I wasn't by myself with absolutely no clue what to do. The only thing I wish I would have talked to her about more, is the first week of school.

Hope this helps!
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I am a first year teacher
Old 01-11-2010, 05:30 PM
 
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and there are several things I wish I would've learned in student-teaching/college. I had a great student-teaching experience, but my problem was that I student-taught 9th grade at a college-prep high school. The only problems I saw during student-teaching were a couple of kids who didn't turn in their homework and helicopter parents. Now, I am teaching in middle school, grades 6-8, in a low-income district on a Corrective Action plan. Needless to say, my student-teaching didn't prepare me much for my job.

One of the biggest things I wish I could've learned was how to set up my own classroom at the beginning of the year.
How should I organize the desks?
How should I decorate my walls to incorporate word walls, great student work, posters, etc?
How should I organize all my papers?
How should I structure routines and rules?
What do I do when I'm so overwhelmed that I simply want to walk out the door?
How do I motivate kids to turn in their homework or simply motivate them to care?
How do I teach vocabulary to students with language gaps but aren't classified as "ELL"?
Perhaps one of the biggest things I wish I had learned was WHERE DO I FIND RESOURCES? I've spent hours researching online and clicking on the same web pages.

I know I could think of others but my brain is swamped with other things. I hope this helps!
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Prepare them for the worst
Old 01-23-2010, 07:26 AM
 
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I graduated in May 2006. I'm JUST NOW, finally on track to getting a full time position, and it's taken a LOT of work to do it! Unfortunately no one tells you how political and difficult it can be to get a position as a new teacher. If I had $1 for every time my feedback from an interview was, "you did a wonderful and great job, but you have no teaching experience...." I would have collected a lot of $1 bills!!! Unfortunately there wasn't anything I could do about that. I substitute taught for 2 years, and then finally last year I took on a paraeducator position with Special Education (this has been after adding, in addition to my EC-4 cert, my 4-8, all level SpecEd, and all level ESL certs!). I've loved my experiences in SpecEd and love my campus, but as districts are cutting back and shifting their contract teachers throughout the district to fill spots up, it's still difficult to get in!

If I had a student teacher I'd prepare them for the worst, and tell them what they could do to increase their chances of hire! Adding more certifications, which makes you a more flexible educator and shows a school you're willing to do whatever it takes to help students learn (and to continue YOUR professional development), getting into a school as a paraeducator and then doing as much as you can. I started teaching lessons in various classrooms on my campus; and I have just interviewed for a mid-year position, and have already been contacted by HR (our middleman in the hiring process) about updating references so they can continue (which is a good sign). The only thing I can figure is I finally was in the right place, at the right time. Someone is retiring the end of January, and I got a call back from previously interviewing at this campus in July. Reassure your student teacher that if they don't get a position right away, it isn't necessarily THEM or the way they interview. Timing plays a lot in things. Personalities, too. And the makeup of the grade level they're interviewing for. Sometimes if there are already people more green around the gills on a grade level, principals/grade level teams will look to hire someone with more experience for a balance. And last, tell them that if this truly is their passion and they have difficulty getting a job right away... DO NOT GIVE UP! Their perseverance and passion will pay off at some point!

Hope this all helped!
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Old 01-23-2010, 08:56 AM
 
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I'm a first year teacher and one of the best pieces of advice my mom (who has been teaching for 20 years) told me was, "start out like you can hold out." During my first month of teaching I would think, 'is this how I want the rest of the year to be?', if the answer was no I would change it immediately. Also something that is immensely helpful was whenever you find something you want to use in your classroom - be it a worksheet, craft activity, etc., make a copy of it for yourself and put it into a folder. I am hopefully going to be teaching the same grade next year and will have my folder full of tests and quizzes I have made, reading notes I have already typed out, letters and forms for parents, and a multitude of other priceless wealth! This frees up your time to delve deeper into the curriculum. As a first year teacher I sometimes feel like I am barely scratching the surface. Your student teacher may not event think about putting together such a folder during her first year of teaching and it will be a big help!
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Student Teacher
Old 02-09-2010, 06:51 PM
 
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1. Classroom Management Advice (what your system is, what other systems work)
really, to prepare for sub'bing, you have to tell them that they need to crack down.
2. Useful tips - start a classroom library (used book stores), shortcuts
3. Explain why things are (why you laid out the room like that, why these are in those groups)
4. An overall timeframe - there are SO many subjects (elementary) and usually the district or school has a plan!

Be easy on them. Be nice. Be flexible. If you suggest something to them, then help them start it and also, don't expect them to implement the advice.
b/c... Student teachers feel like they don't belong. They are in your room, not theirs.

I loved how one of my master teachers kept a notebook for me and told me what I did well and what to improve on.

And in the end, write them a letter of recommendation and tell them that you will fill out any recommendations for them. It's VERY stressful getting letters of rec's and it's hard to burden a master teacher a few times for them - but we need them!
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I wish
Old 02-15-2010, 05:05 PM
 
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someone would have told me about ALL the EXTRA things teachers do. Remediation, grading papers, keeping track of paperwork, keeping in contact with the parents. I wish someone would have told me teaching goes beyond what you do in the classroom. I am a first year teacher and am struggling with coming up with things for remeditation, frankly, I was not aware I had to send things home to remediate, I never did as a student teacher. Also I find grading papers and filling out report cards to be VERY stressful. I was doing fine until my principal told me I had to lower a student's grade on the report card even though his test averages were higher. Ever since then I am afraid to grade my tests, for the fear I will be told to lower the grades again. Just open their eyes to ALL that teaching entails. I was an AMAZING student teacher, but do not consider myself to be an AMAZING teacher right now. Hopefully this will change soon. Make sure you give your student teacher a GLIMPSE at all the EXTRA things teachers do to avoid shock when she gets hired for her own room. Also let her know she may not find a job right away. It took me 2 yrs to find a teaching job, which is probably why I feel a little lost, since I graduated in 2007 and did not get a job until 2009. I hope things go well.
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I'm a first year teacher & I wish I knew...
Old 04-11-2010, 09:38 PM
 
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- Planning out a year: this is the most important!
- How to set up a Gradebook (I like EasyGradePro)
- How to get ready for Test Prep
- Essay Rubrics

I wish I knew these things beforehand... fortunately, I learned them from fellow helpful teachers along my journey.

The thing that has saved me this year is organization!

1. My handy tool is a file system. I use a crate with legal size folders. I organize the weeks by color. I have a months worth of copies ready and it helps me stay neat at work.

2. I have a separate file system for my students. As soon as I have papers graded I have some of my student helpers file these papers. Every Wednesday (I've trained them) to staple the packets together. These are their Wednesday packets. These go home to their parents on Wednesdays.
- Along with these packets the students receive a label with all assignments that should be in that packet. This sticky label goes in their agenda under that Wednesday. The label has a spot for missing assignments, behavior warnings and most importantly a parent signature. This is how I communicate with parents. When their child comes back with the Wed sticker signed that's them telling me they have seen the work.

(This way, when Parent Teacher conference time comes they shouldn't be surprised with their child's grades... my way of covering myself!)

Hope those help!
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Parents!
Old 05-08-2010, 11:27 AM
 
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I finished up my student teaching in November, and I am preparing for my first year as a 6th-8th grade math teacher. The BEST things learned during student teaching were...

--CALLING PARENTS! This was a huge part of my experience as a student teacher. So many of my fellow student teachers had no contact with them, and it was so important and it helped me out so much with classroom management and keeping me on the same page as the parents!

--Let your student teacher experiment. When my co-operating teacher let me do my own thing I was a much more effective teacher.

--Classroom management....I am subbing right now and I am so thankful that I learned in student teaching that we are there to support our students, but not be their best friends--you get so much more done that way!
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Things I Wish I Learnt
Old 06-02-2010, 08:06 AM
 
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I wish that I had learned that you don't need to sacrifice your personal life to be a good teacher.

That you don't have to spend hours of time on meaningless marking to create meaningful learning settings.

I see teachers trained that if they're enjoying life, then they're not spending enough time working. Create classroom systems that make your time efficient and not overwhelming.

Yes, the work load will be high the first couple of years, and it will never get better if you don't create systems that reduce it.
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I wish I had learned...
Old 07-28-2010, 07:47 AM
 
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I wish I had been told a bit about how to set up a new classroom at the beginning of the year! I'm just preparing/planning for my first classroom, and I learned nothing about that as a student teacher! I know it wouldn't have been easy, since as a student teacher you begin in an established classroom in the middle of the year, but some advice would have been helpful!
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