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TeachbyGrace TeachbyGrace is offline
 
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failed tests?
Old 02-08-2010, 07:38 PM
 
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I'd like to know what are some options that you all do for failed tests. I just corrected a test and the majority of my students did well. I feel like its the same students over and over again who don't do well...and now that we're really getting into some harder content dealing with fractions, I have a couple terribly failed grades. I feel frustrated because I don't know what else to do to reach these students...I also feel frustrated because for most of them I just don't see the effort. And yet I just CAN'T keep going with them failing this test like this. Does anyone have any ideas? I'd like to do something where I can allow the other students to "move on" some how or maybe do some sort of project for a few days, but reteach these students at the same time and make them retake it...something that will make them get the message that they need to start putting in some effort as well!


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Old 02-09-2010, 06:45 AM
 
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I have my kids split into groups (two of them currently) so that the kids who can move along more quickly can keep moving, but the ones who need content retaught to them can move at their own pace too. It is tricky to manage, but I think it is well worth it. When students score below an 80% on a math test, they are given a packet of work that reviews the lessons in that chapter. It is due the next day (which they hate so it adds motivation for them to fully prepare for future tests). After I have checked the review packet and they have made all corrections, they can retake the test. The grade that goes in my book is the grade they earned on the second test.
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Old 02-09-2010, 11:43 AM
 
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Whenever I have students who fail a test, I have them come in during a recess or lunch and I will orally ask them the questions that they missed. If they missed an entire question (essay, etc...) then I will have them tell me everything they can and I have typed out their answer and graded that instead...some students have difficulties transferring their ideas from mind to paper...so, sometimes it helps for them to say it out loud first...

Anyway...If they can orally re-tell me the answer, clearly they know it, they just couldn't remember it at the time and I will give them partial credit for their test.

I usually do this for all of my students, even the ones who scored really high, however, for the grades to be changed, they would have to have failed the test, not simply hit a certain cut off.

Our F starts at 64% and lower...so, sometimes F's can be common, as much as I hate to see that.
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Old 02-09-2010, 02:21 PM
 
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Depends why they failed it. I give study guides for ALL tests that are almost replicas of tests. They turn in study guides with the test (uaually for a few extra points). If they do the study guide and STILL fail the test (has only happened a few times) then something is wrong and I will meet with the student.

If they don't bother to do the study guide then that's their poor choice and the "F" stands.

Also, I let them re-do tests for a better grade (and everything) and mine have gotten into the mindset that they don't have to try the first time because they get an automatic re-do and so I am starting to take that option away.
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Old 02-09-2010, 07:06 PM
 
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I was in a meeting just today and heard a suggestion I had not thought of--specifically for math. Try to get a copy of the 4th and 6th grade texts. If a child fails to master a skill, go back to the previous grade's presentation. Use that material to review and/or reteach. The 6th grade book would be used for those who are up for the challenge.

Fortunately for me, I can get a CD for each grade level's materials and install them on my school and home computers for easy access.

I was excited to hear this, as I too was feeling frustrated trying to remediate after every test.


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great ideas
Old 02-11-2010, 07:24 AM
 
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These are great ideas! I usually just allow kiddos to correct mistakes for 1/2 credit. If somone really bombs something, then I reteach and make them take another version of the test.
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failed test
Old 02-13-2010, 09:24 AM
 
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This just happened in my class where a majority of the class got a C/D. I let them retake the test this time using their notes. Then I averaged both test scores and gave them that as a grade. Looking back at their notes provided more learning for them.
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