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9th or 10th level in THIRD grade
Old 07-21-2012, 09:15 AM
 
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I am supposed to be getting a student this year that is on an extremely high reading level. We don't have a gifted program. Ideas please?!? I am implementing Daily 5 and CAFE and using the basal (a little ;-)


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9th and 10th grade level reading?
Old 07-21-2012, 12:53 PM
 
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Is that what you mean?

I would contact the high school librarian and ask for suggestions. You will probably need to have books transferred to your school. I doubt the elementary library has many books that high.

You might also ask a librarian at a public library for helpful suggestions.

It will be difficult to find a book that is challenging without being too mature.

You might start with some classics like Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland, Swiss Family Robinson, Robinson Crusoe and Treasure Island. These might be a little lower, like 8th grade level.
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Maturity level
Old 07-21-2012, 04:16 PM
 
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I agree, this will be the issue. What about non fiction material?
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HS Library
Old 07-21-2012, 04:40 PM
 
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Be careful with the content of High School Library Books, if you go that route.... Even though the child's level is high, 3rd graders should still read things that are age-appropriate.

I had a 6 year old coming to 3rd grade a few years ago, and her reading level was upper 8th. I gave her permission to read up to her level as long as her mother or I approved the book.

Your state doesn't require a Gifted Program to service these children?
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Old 07-21-2012, 04:50 PM
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Sorry, did not make myself clear
Old 07-21-2012, 04:57 PM
 
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I meant to say that the HS librarian would suggest books for a third graders. If she is a good librarian she will know the content of the books. Then she can give you a list of titles that would work well for that age.


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Challenging!
Old 07-21-2012, 04:58 PM
 
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I agree with suggesting classics and non fiction. In fact, I had a boy last year whose favorite books were encyclopedias!!! Perhaps this child will bring his or her own books to school to read, since I doubt your student has gotten to the 10th grade reading level without knowing his or her way around the library or book store.

First, I would be sure to test my advanced student for comprehension, just in case the student reads flawlessly without deep understanding.

I would then make sure the child has read broadly and not just skipped past all the great books that are out there just because he/she can read harder material. For example, I have all my students read certain books that relate to our social studies themes. Of course I need to support some of my students much more than others. So for some students, I would almost do a read aloud or focus on how to decode long words, where for an advance student, I might ask him/her to read two books on the same subject and contrast and compare them or relate them to his own life in writing.

I'd also consider having the student focus on vocabulary, perhaps developing a glossary for some of the grade level books you have in the classroom, and certainly for many of the books he reads this coming year whatever the level.

If your student is so advanced, perhaps he could focus on writing a book of his own rather than solely on reading more books. Perhaps you could confer with the child to see if there are any independent projects he would like to work on since clearly he has has met the requirements of third grade reading. It is unlikely that this child, who is such a strong reader, will stop reading just because you give him the opportunity to work on other things. I'm recalling stories I've heard of geniuses who haven't necessarily done well in school and just wanted the teachers to get out of their way!

By the way, your student should flourish with D5 & CAFE - especially with the read to self component! Good luck with whatever approach you decide to take!
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agree pp
Old 07-21-2012, 05:44 PM
 
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I agree with the PP and there is no reason that just because he can read that high that he needs to all the time. I still enjoy children's books! I also have a daughter that is several grade levels above in reading and has been for several years and the appropriate content is what the issue is. Even the print size and lack of pictures fails to occupy some of the younger strong readers.
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high reading level
Old 07-22-2012, 05:37 AM
 
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I seem to have at least one child every year that can read that high, so it's no longer a scary thing. Just because a child CAN read at that level, don't expect them to necessarily WANT to. I had one child some years ago that came to me at 7th grade reading level and was 10th grade level by the end of the year. He really preferred Hank the Cowdog books. Another a few years later got "hooked" on the Warrior series--the ones with cats for characters. He was on a 12th grade reading level, preferring 5th/6th grade level books. A friend's daughter was in my class a couple of years ago. The child can read just about anything, but she preferred fairy or horse books. She reads a 1 1/2-2 inch thick chapter book a night!!! And remembers the content. She also got stuck on that Warrior series in 4th grade.

I've always held to the policy that books above grade level had to be approved for content appropriateness. But usually that's not really a problem. Children seem to prefer books that are more age appropriate, even if they are below their ability level. I would encourage that. There is a LOT of good literature out there that shouldn't be skipped just because the child can read above that level. Just encourage LOTS of reading in lots of genres, so that the child is well-rounded.
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Scholastic!
Old 07-22-2012, 12:37 PM
 
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I would strongly recommend scholastic's website --- you can look up books that are a higher reading (lexile) level, but at a 3-5th grade interest area. There are lots of books out there with a challenging vocabulary without concern over content --- getting the books might be the more challenging part! You can print the list too!

You might also find if there are areas where this student could use reinforcements: maybe this student can spend more time on writing or math during independent work time (since they will finish the grade level reading fairly quickly is my assumption).

I have a few VERY HIGH readers coming into my 3rd grade class as well --- and this suggestion was passed on by another veteran teacher
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