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hawkfam hawkfam is offline
 
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Tutoring question
Old 05-12-2008, 02:55 PM
 
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I will be tutoring a young boy this summer that has ADHD and severe anxiety. Does anyone have any creative ideas that I can use with him. He has a very hard time concentrating and retaining information and his fine motor is a concern. He is on meds but still has a difficult time. Some things that he does is repeats questions several times, flaps arms, easily distracted and worried about things all of the time. I was trying to think of some different things to do with him. HELP?????


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Old 05-12-2008, 04:17 PM
 
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Shaving cream always seems to be a fun one for spelling words etc. Rolling playdoh while you guys are reviewing things. That will help with fine motor and anxiousness while you are covering lessons. I think anything you use besides paper and pen would be fun and beneficial to him: magnetic letters, letter tiles, dry-erase etc.
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Old 05-12-2008, 04:37 PM
 
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What skills will you be working on? What age is the child? Where will you be tutoring?
I agree definitely hands on activities to keep interest. Also, your work area should be one with minimal distractions. I work with a child at school that I must even close the blinds to help him focus on what's going on inside the room.
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Old 05-13-2008, 04:34 AM
 
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He is 6 and I was thinking about tutoring him at school because I think my house would be to distracting and he will be in the same grade as I teach next year so I could get him use to the building and grade.

I am not really sure on what skills he is needing, but I know that comprehension and vocabulary are a big one. Math he seems to be doing really well. I like the playdough idea! I will try that!!!

Thanks for the ideas!!
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Old 05-13-2008, 12:50 PM
 
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I worked with a kindergarten student this year on comprehension. We started with picture books. I would have her look at each picture and tell me the story through the pictures. Afterwards, I would have the student retell the story without looking at the book. Then I would ask about the setting, characters and such. Eventually, we have progressed to me reading the story to her. I always have her retell the story. Then I ask her about the story elements and then the comprehension questions.

For vocabulary or sight words, you could make up some cards to play memory. Each time a match is made, have the student tell you the word and either use it in a sentence or define it. Of course, with just one student, you should take a turn.

If the student is going into first grade, I would assume it would be appropriate to work with sight words. I would take about 10-15 minutes going over flashcards. If the words are too hard, you could start out trying to get him to pick out the words you call out, or simply help him sound out the words until he can do it on his own. I would make up a log that he can color, to keep track of his sight words learned and keep reviewing the same sight words, adding a few at a time so there are at least five words each time that still need to be learned. The log not only helps you see progress, but helps to encourage the child when he thinks he isn't learning. It probably wouldn't hurt to give the child homework - to practice his sight words for five minutes every day.


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Whoa-
Old 05-13-2008, 01:44 PM
 
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Flapping arms? This is a sign that he may have some aspergers/autism going on. NOT for you to tell the parent, but-

If this is the case, coupled with his anxiety, I suggest a picture schedule of what you will be doing at each session. Each session should be exactly the same so he knows what will happen. This will relieve his anxiety immensely, as he will know exactly what to expect.

If you can couple the picture schedule with a visual countdown timer (really good stuff has some good ones), the sessions should go much more smoothly.
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Thank you so much
Old 05-13-2008, 04:28 PM
 
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Wow! Thank you for all of the awesome ideas! I am excited to use them all. WHAT NEAT IDEAS! I will have our special ed. teacher make up a picture schedule that he can use.
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Old 05-13-2008, 06:27 PM
 
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I can't believe I read the original post a couple of times and completely missed the arm flapping. With the autistic kids I have worked with, focus has been the main issue. I agree that you need hands on activities. Just be willing to redirect focus more often.
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