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First time sub--what tips you got?

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EatPrayLove EatPrayLove is offline
 
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First time sub--what tips you got?
Old 09-07-2019, 07:42 AM
 
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Hi All,
I have been a classroom teacher for a long time but recently moved to a new town and new district. I am taking the year off to sub and get to know the schools. Can you give me any tips that make subbing smooth for you?

Thank you!


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My top tip (may only work for elementary)
Old 09-07-2019, 08:30 AM
 
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Searching the archives of this board will give you several ideas on how to survive as a sub. That’s not my top tip, though. Here it is:

For every class I sub, I make a quick sketch of the desk arrangement and fill in the name of each student. In the lower grades, the name cards are usually taped to the desk, and with the upper grades, I can always find who sits where by looking through their notebooks inside the desks.


It makes such a difference to be able to call the students by name, and they love it. I use the chart for taking attendance, keeping track of who turned in homework, etc. Since I often sub for the same teachers, I usually only have to do the seating chart one time.

ETA: Just one more thing that someone on this board (MaineSub?) suggested, and I use it every time I sub. I say there are 3 things to remember today: 1) Things are going to be a little different today, b/c your regular teacher isn’t here. 2) We are going to enjoy learning today. 3) Keep Mrs. Mooba happy.
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Old 09-08-2019, 03:36 AM
 
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Good luck, it is quite a change of pace from being a regular teacher . I would suggest finding a grade level you like and sticking with that. I only try to do high school now, but I will still do middle school if I have to.

Donít take roving sub jobs, moving from class to class during passing period is a pain. Hard to get settled in a new classroom you just got into.

I avoid stuff like PE. You will probably end up being asked to cover one on a prep though.

You will quickly learn what schools support you and which just want a body in the room. If I go to a school and they switch assignments on me or continually ask me to cover extra classes I take them off my list.

Pick your battles. Students arenít going to respect you in the same way when you were a teacher. Neither will admin, office staff or even most teachers. Youíll never with the battle against phones.

Youíll find out what security does with kids when you have them removed. Most schools I go to bring them back after 20 or 30 minutes. They will either be completely withdrawn or even more defiant than before. Sometimes itís not worth it to call them and I just ride it out for the period, but this is usually rare.

Iíd check out the other threads on this topic. Itíll probably be easier for you because you have classroom management experience already.
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Old 09-08-2019, 12:37 PM
 
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Eatpraylove

You will have good and bad days. Just remember itís only for one day and I can do anything for just one day.
Iíve tried High School and middle school not for me! I only sub for 1-4
5 if I know the teacher and the class. K only for coverage for iep, etc as in a roving teacher.
I also have Jobulator for $6 a month that bings when there are sub jobs available. Iím retired and love the flexibility of subbing.
Try to follow the plans as much as possible and go over expectations, reminding them that this is Mrs. So and So room and we will act like she could come through the door at any minute and we want to leave a good note. Most classes are pretty good and every once in awhile you will get ďthat classĒ
Good luck
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EatPrayLove EatPrayLove is offline
 
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:26 PM
 
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Oh--that is so helpful. Thank you!


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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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Remembering you're not the teacher...
Old 09-09-2019, 02:37 AM
 
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I've worked with and talked with a number of teachers who, for various reasons, have switched to subbing--often after retirement. For some, the hardest part has been remembering it's not their classroom. Teachers who like to run a really tight ship with procedures can have difficulty working in a classroom where the regular teacher is "loosey-goosey." It's important to remember that both can work. I believe the most important quality for a sub is flexibility... there's a certain amount of adapting required. I know one retired teacher who would announce she didn't use the regular teacher's lesson plans, she came prepared. After two assignments she wasn't called back.
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Old 09-09-2019, 11:27 AM
 
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I definitely second mooba1's seating chart advice! That's always my first order of business as well.

I'm the opposite of Fractured on taking the roving jobs, though. - I actually like them, especially at a new school, because:
1) you get to meet the teachers and catch a glimpse of how they run things, &
2) you get a quick impression of which classes you like and don't like (useful later when you have multiple choices.)

Elepen's "I can do anything for just one day" mantra is great as well!
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subasaurus subasaurus is offline
 
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10 tips
Old 09-09-2019, 04:45 PM
 
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1. Always follow lesson plans, no matter what.

2. Don't yell at students (unless they're blatantly acting dangerous, or over the top disrespectful.)

3. Get attendance squared away and sent to the office every period.

4. On occasion students may attempt to prank you and/or lie through their teeth.

5. Having a sense of humor and/or thick skin helps when appropriate.

6. Don't bother trying to take their phones unless they're using them in an obscene manner.

7. They will certainly attempt to cheat during tests.

8. Be careful with bathroom breaks. They sometimes abuse the pass system and use it to escape class.

9. Don't let the kids "see you sweat" or "lose your cool." Stay calm as possible.

10. Every day is your first day on the job. Dress formally, stay professional, and get to know your neighboring teachers.
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