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Luvi
 
 
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Luvi
 
 
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iep meetings
Old 01-25-2006, 12:13 PM
 
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Do special ed teachers read each of the goals on their iep's during the meeting or are they supposed to just "summarize". I am not sure how to begin talking at the meeting? Any pointers?


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indaga indaga is offline
 
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Yup
Old 01-25-2006, 01:42 PM
 
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Luvi,

I begin my meetings by reviewing the student's present level of performance. Then I do read each goal and the benchmarks so the classroom teacher and parent know exactly what the plan will be. Goals and benchmarks can be modified and the classroom teachers/parents have a say in the process. They agree to the IEP and modifications as written but then I always make sure the teachers have a current copy of the modifications so they know the expectations they need to fulfill to assist the student. Hope this helps!
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IEP Mtg
Old 01-30-2006, 03:57 PM
 
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I have a written agenda for the IEP meeting. This helps to keep everyone on task and keep the focus of the meeting. If we start to get sidetracked I can get them back on track by referring to the agenda. I usually start off with comments from the parent; then ask teachers to give a summary of how the student is doing in their class. I'm in a Middle School, so may have a few teachers at the meeting. Then I/we review the IEP that is currently in place and discuss Present Levels of Performance. When reviewing the goals/objectives I will state if the goal has been met and if I recommend that we change it, discontinue, write a new goal or whatever. I go over each part of the the current IEP, note changes on my copy. After the meeting I write the new IEP making changes as discussed at the meeting.
For me the agenda is the key to keeping the meeting running smoothly and also to make sure I cover everything I need to discuss.
Hope this helps!
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Beginning a meeting
Old 02-03-2006, 10:56 AM
 
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If this is a review IEP, I begin the meeting by giving a short review of last year's IEP, objectives mastered, growth noted in the year that has passed. This gives a good platform to begin constructing the new IEP.

I conducted an IEP meeting a couple of days ago. We began by talking about where we were when we first met two years, the progress last year, and thus far this school year. It was a short discussion, and only took a couple of minutes. This set us up to move quickly into where we want to head during the next year. It put the parent, the grandparent, the two regular ed teachers, the related services personnel, and me at ease. We had a great meeting.

I think we have to know where we've been, in order to know which way to go. A quick review of things accomplished and even not accomplished, puts everyone on the same page when getting started at an IEP meeting.

As far as reading the goals and objectives go, I usually read each one of them. At some meetings where the parent and I have already spoken about new goals for the next year, I may just summarize. I may say, "This is the goal we discussed last week about working with the concept of time. The objectives will be telling time to the half-hour and quarter-hour."

Hope this helps you.
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Your question
Old 02-11-2006, 10:27 AM
 
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Luvi,
In my experience w/iep meetings, I've determined that whether I read
each goal or summarize depends on 3 things..1) whether the parent
is on the clock..2) whether I'm on the clock..and 3) whether the parent
even cares one way or the other.

I try to limit my iep meetings to 40 minutes, max, which is my prep
period. If a parent wants to go shorter due to his/her own schedule,
all the better..hence, a summary works, with the invitation (by you)
to "call me if you have any questions or concerns once you've had
a chance to read the iep in detail at home...we can always revise
it.."

And..if you know your parents well enough, you know which ones only
want the iep to insure that they get their SSI benefits for having a special
needs kid..don't care (and probably don't comprehend) the paperwork
and so, you can use very basic language in your conversation and
avoid iep lingo. Say something like, "Would you like me to read
you the goals in detail or are you satisfied to have me summarize?"
If they don't care about anything but their SSI benefits, they'll request
the summary.

TRELLIS


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I went to a seminar
Old 11-05-2006, 09:50 PM
 
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You asked how to start teaching. I went to a two hour seminar that we had at learly release. This seminar spoke directly to us on how to talk to parents of special needs children. It was fantastic. It discussed the parents' feelings and then about what our objectives were. Lots of interesting stuff. It was in very practical terms, none of that theory stuff. I liked it. I have some materials from it. I think there is a website. If you want, I will try to find that and get to you. Maybe your school would want to have this done for an early release of something.
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Rad
Old 11-06-2006, 12:59 PM
 
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RAD ....would you mind posting a sample copy of your agenda? We have been discussing the use of agendas at our department meetings. I would appreciate using your agenda as an example for my co-workers.

Thank you!!
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Old 11-06-2006, 03:19 PM
 
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I have to agree with TRELLIS!! It all depends on the area you are in and the type of parents you have. My parents could care less what is in the IEP they want to be in and out and I have to beg them to even come in for the meeting in the first place. Unfortunately, like Trellis, most my parents just want that SSI check each month.
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Old 11-06-2006, 07:22 PM
 
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I have been teaching special ed. for 10 years. Currently, I have 40 students in a Resource class, most are pullout and a few inclusion. I have had some of my students for 4 years now, so their families are like family to me. I usually start the meeting with whatever the most crucial/problematic issue is at the time. Usually the child is having a specific difficulty, or parents are concerned about something specific. If so, that's where I start. Otherwise, I ALWAYS let the classroom teacher begin be telling the parent how the child is performing in the gen ed class. After that, I go by the order of the IEP or addendum, or whatever paperwork we are completing. However, I totally agree that there are times when parents and teachers are in a rush and you HAVE to give the Reader's Digest version (short and sweet)!
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