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Dragonlady Dragonlady is offline
 
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Money Woes
Old 01-29-2008, 02:53 PM
 
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I teach in a resource room. I am so depressed. I was asked by a second grade teacher if I could help two girls in in class. They both have IEPs. They are both below grade level in math. One girl is lower than the other. I have no time in the regular day to tutor these girls. So, I am tutoring them during my lunch/prep. I want to help these girls so much. And, the teacher is really sweet about any help they get. She just wants to see improvement. As do I. I am trying to teach them money right now. Identifying money value, counting money, sorting money, everything I feel they need to learn. The problem is that I don't feel they are making adequate progress. I have a collection of all denominations of money. We use worksheets, the textbook, and workbooks. They still can't count money. For example: Today I asked "how many pennies does it take to make a dollar"? Mind you we have been working on this for a couple of days now. I got various answers. The answers varied from 1 penny to 10 pennies. I can't figure out what I am doing wrong. My daughter, who is an early childhood teacher, says my expectations are to high. That I can only do so much and that is all. Somehow, I must find a way to help these girls. If any of you have tips, hints, or advice as to how I am going to reach these girls please let me know.


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Expectations
Old 01-29-2008, 07:20 PM
 
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I agree with your daughter that your expectations may be too high. I teach middle school and have students that don't know 100 pennies = one dollar. Sometimes it is a maturity thing. I have had students in 6th grade that I think will never be able to count money and then suddenly the next year it just all clicks for them.
I do believe you need to keep working on it, but don't beat yourself up when the students don't progress as you feel they should. It is very likely it has nothing to do with you or your teaching.
Just keep working on it. I would bring in some things they could buy. Give them some coins and let them pick out something to buy. Then they need to count out the money they need. This is more meaningful than comparing values.
Just my opinion, but I have taught Special Education for over 20 years and believe me when I say that students will learn when they are ready to learn. Don't let this get you down. I'm sure you are doing a good job.
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thanks
Old 01-30-2008, 05:31 PM
 
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Thank you for the advice. I will try your suggestions about the store. Thanks again.
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lisandom lisandom is offline
 
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Teaching money
Old 02-12-2008, 02:47 PM
 
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Your expectations are too high! Your daughter is right. Students do not get this if they are not exposed in a meaningful manner. Until they can purchase items with money, they really won't get it. Our students do have the opportunity to purchase items with money and may not see their parents handle cash. It is kind of you to tutor them on your lunch hour, but are they on your caseload???? You can only do so much.
One thing I do is make cards with the plastic coins and values. We play matching games and review the names and values with the coins. I also use multi-sided dice (usually a 10 and a 9 sided cube) so that students have the practice of using dimes and pennies. When they get comfortable with that we "make it another way" exchanging 5 pennies for a a nickel, etc. Also using pecs & coin cards with snacks that they can purchase in the lunch room. For example, 2 quarters on a card = $0.50 w/ a picture of an ice cream. Have these in a wallet. ( parents provide money for snacks) I also use classroom math kit money to rent pencils etc, changing my prices often
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Teaching Money
Old 02-22-2008, 05:44 PM
 
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I am only a student teacher, but I would like to offer something which you might try. I am getting ready to teach a lesson on money to a first grade class. As part of the practice portion I am going to use a couple of websites. I have included link a link to a site called internet4classroom.com. Although this is for 1st grade, there are several variations of money counting which might work for your girls. You can also inquiry on second grade levels too. The group I am working with is low end 1st grade. I am hoping that I might be able to reach them by using something they are familiar with: the computer.

http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skills_1st.htm#math

Good luck.
P.S. Thanks for taking time for these girls. It sounds like you REALLY care!


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spedchic spedchic is offline
 
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variables that affect progress
Old 02-26-2008, 11:24 PM
 
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1. Do they understand what you are asking them?
Use concrete communication (verbal comprehension, auditory processing, memory issues may be getting in your way). Ask them to show you a penny. Have the word penny written and available to see when you show them, and be sure that they know what you're asking for.

2. If they have IEPS, you need to look at their most recent evaluations. If you can't reach them or don't see progress, look at what the evaluations show is their difficulty. Evaluations will give you suggested ways to teach a student. Follow those suggestions or make sure that you are already following them.

3. Stick to one goal at a time. If they can not identify money, don't ask them to count money in their head. Baby steps, with lots and lots of repetition.

just some thoughts....
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