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Is there a glut of teachers in Georgia???
Old 06-07-2019, 07:29 PM
 
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Can anyone offer any insight into the current state of teaching jobs in Georgia?

More specifically, the metro Atlanta area. I by no means have a perfect record but I DO have years of experience, multiple certs, and an advanced degree. I have only gotten a handful of interviews and no offers.

When I go to job fairs here, they are PACKED with candidates in all areas, even math, science, and ESOL. The only real “shortages” I see are in very specialized high school math, science, career/tech education, and SPED.

Am I going crazy? Or is it is actually the case that save for the 4-5 areas mentioned above, teaching in GA has become super competitive? I have primarily taught ESOL which everyone tells me is an "in-demand" area but I'm definitely not seeing any shortage of candidates for the ESOL jobs here...


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Old 06-08-2019, 04:21 AM
 
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In Florida,
Ive noticed too, that the shortages are for specialized jobs- especially SPED and middle/highschool subject areas
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Old 06-08-2019, 05:51 AM
 
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There seems to be a glut all.along the east coast. A colleague recently moved to California and had a hard time there, too. I wonder if it is the same on the west coast? Another is considering Florida and said that it was tough to find a decent job and the pay was low even with the lower COL compared to where she is now. I went to small local job fair. All told, there may have been 100 teaching positions available and around 800 people showed up. And I am being generous about the number of teaching positions, they were also recruiting for IT, maintenance, and food service staff. The bulk of the positions were in one large urban district. One district literally had 2 positions open. I wondered why they even bothered attending a job fair.
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What teacher shortage???
Old 06-08-2019, 06:20 AM
 
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Yeah, when I go to job fairs in GA, I can understand the long lines of people for elementary education, English, PE, art, and Social Studies postions. I can also understand the lines for very affluent schools or schools with high test scores.

But I am seeing equally long lines for MS math, MS science, and ES, MS, and HS ESOL at tons of schools. Then I hear about the national "STEM teacher shortage" and I am wondering what fresh trash THAT is because only the toughest, roughest inner city and "in the middle of nowhere" backwoods rural schools have any sort of "shortage" of math/science candidates here!

As mentioned prior, only high school seems to be the exception to this. Supposedly foreign language/bilingual is another area, though that's more to lack of appropriate certs than a shortage of people. SPED at all levels too.

Same goes for ESOL. Only the most isolated rural communities are having any kind of trouble finding qualified candidates.
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Old 06-08-2019, 11:02 AM
 
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I have several friends unable to get hired despite their experience. My district tends to hire new grads to save money.


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We need staff, including elementary
Old 06-08-2019, 01:57 PM
 
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This is the critical need list for my northern VA district:

Audiologist
English as a Second Language
General Ed. Grades K-6
Immersion* (French, Japanese, Korean, Spanish)
Librarian
Mathematics
Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physics
Psychologists
Social Workers
Special Education
Speech-Language Pathologist
Technology Education
Visual Impairment
Spanish
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:39 PM
 
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Sonoma, if you don't mind my asking, what areas are your friends certified in and what postions are they pursuing?

Tgbwc I have heard about the need for teachers in Virginia. Looks like such a pretty state Wish it wasn't so $$$ and bloated in bureaucracy to relocate in our country. Due to family obligations, I am tied to GA.

Does VA at least have reciprocity?
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:31 PM
 
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not sure what specific areas you are looking in, but in the surrounding counties of me, they cannot find enough teachers!
Expand your search to outside the perimeter. You should be able to find open positions.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:37 PM
 
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I know of others who have had no difficulty with reciprocity from states such as PA and NY. I don't know about GA.
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What teacher shortage??? Part Deux
Old 06-08-2019, 08:33 PM
 
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Peaches250, I have been to multiple job fairs OTP and applied to many positions OTP. There seem to be at least three times more qualified candidates than there are vacancies:<__<

I thought about adding Middle Grades Math a while back to be more competitive but it seems like there are more than enough math candidates now. I got MG Science years ago and it got pretty annoying to constantly hear, "You'll have no trouble finding a job" OR "You would think..."

Honestly, almost no cert areas seem "certain" for employment anymore.

That said, any recommendations on counties that are in need of MS or HS ESOL? Or a comparable area? I'm flexible

Elementary Ed, English Language Arts, and Math are currently listed as "in-demand" in Georgia. I want to ask, "Where???"
I hear “STEM teacher shortage” and I'm like “You mean HS STEM, right? ES and MS STEM seems to be doing just fine here."
I hear "red state teacher demand" and I'm like "Not here."
I constantly hear , "You have so much AMAZING experience" but then never hear back.
@__@. @__@. @__@

Tgbwc well I'll be darned, looks like GA does have reciprocity with VA. I am stuck in GA for the time being but I will definitely keep that in mind for the future!

Sorry for the venting. I know I am blessed to have even gotten interviews. Thank you all for the wonderful replies!


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Old 06-08-2019, 08:44 PM
 
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I’m in California. Most are looking for elementary positions. A few for social studies - we have way too many social studies credentials and those who coach get priority
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Teacher overflow
Old 06-08-2019, 09:04 PM
 
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I wonder how many of the applicants are teachers trying to escape lower paying and non-Union charter schools where they may have worked in the past. I know several younger teachers here in SoCal who were desperately trying to flee the charter schools where they worked. They were thrilled to finally land a spot in a regular public school with better pay and working conditions.
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Old 06-09-2019, 01:40 AM
 
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I’m trying up and down the west coast, public and private. I’m applying to small towns in the middle of nowhere and larger districts. The city I’m in is cutting the budget again, so there aren’t many jobs. Some out of state schools instantly reject me because I don’t have the state teaching license. I went to the big job fair this year and a lot of districts didn’t even bother to show up. Someone from Seattle told me to get a SS credential, like I can go back and do that without having to do a practicum and go back to school. Some of these people are clueless. Another school would have required me to fly down for the 2nd interview on my own dime. It looks like Florida, Nc, and Arizona are the places that are desperate for teachers. But they are either right to work states and/or horrible pay and working conditions. Why move across the country for a job that pays in the low 30s? I’m totally ready to throw in the towel at this point. No one leaves good districts now, even if they have to put up with a ton of ####.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:02 AM
 
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I know it is frustrating. When I first started teaching, there were 300 applications per job! It was a nightmare to get employed, especially since I had no experience.


Here are a couple of links. Hopefully they will help. I am not sure about the ESOL positions. They are pretty specialized and rare. You may have to get your foot in the door another way.


https://www.applitrack.com/rockdale/...aching&all=cat


https://www.applitrack.com/rockdale/...chool+Teaching


https://www.applitrack.com/henry/onl...=MIDDLE+SCHOOL


https://www.applitrack.com/henry/onl...ory=ELEMENTARY


https://www.applitrack.com/Gwinnett/...egory=Teachers


The schools are reaching the time of year where they need the positions filled. I would apply to anything you are qualified for. I know one of the big teaching universities started doing a dual degree with gen/esol. That maybe why there are not many of those positions open.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:04 AM
 
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Fractured, bet you get to hear all about the "teacher shortage" there too? Like you, I've applied to all kinds of schools-public, private, virtual, and charter. Plus, I feel you on the "credentials." I have like four or five at this point and I still keep getting, "Well, we wished you had _______ certification" or "This job requires certification in two areas, three preferred." I've already spent over $700 on cert tests, thank you<__<

Really, the reason I started this thread was to gauge if GA has too many teachers, and what kinds of teachers are actually in demand in the state. Because there don't seem to be ANY, and I wish the news would stop acting like math, science, and ESOL are "hot." Maybe they were fifteen years ago, but not now.

Compared to NC, FL, and AZ, GA treats their teachers...all right. The conditions and pay are...all right. The main thing is the astronomical cost of housing, which seems to be a national pattern. Expect to fork over 1000+ a month minimum in rent to live in a safe area if you are teaching anywhere around Atlanta, unless you have family, friends, or a SO who can pitch in. Or you could try to buy a house. Good luck competing with the tech people making triple your income or Northerners who cashed out their houses back home and can now afford anything here.

I have enjoyed learning about the situation in other states too. CA seems to shift between "shortage" and "glut" all the time on these teacher message boards and it's neat to hear "insider" info.
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In Arizona
Old 06-09-2019, 10:17 AM
 
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I hear about the shortages, but I don’t see a lot of hiring going on. I do see a lot of consolidation, or down-sizing, of positions. For example, a class size of 23 for three teachers for a grade level sounds perfect. One of the three teachers retires leaving two in that grade level. The district due to funding issues decides not to hire another teacher for that grade. They end up “saving” money by now having almost 36 kids per class between the two teachers. Arizona has no official or legal cap on classroom sizes either.

I also agree with what some others have said about the districts’ saving money by hiring new teachers versus experienced ones who tend to make more money.

The general state of education is just sad. Good luck in your job searches.
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:54 AM
 
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I am in Oregon. A lot of teachers come from out of state to work here. It is rated as one of the best states to teach in even though we are rated lowly academically. I am Language arts, so there are way more of us than jobs. The problem is to get certified, I’d have to go back to grad school and take classes and do a practicum and take the test. That’s about 10k and time I don’t have. My rent is def over 1k. I have looked into places like Oakland or L.A. , but the cost of living is much greater than the wages and you’d basically have to work at the worst, roughest school in the city. I’m pretty much ready to give up.

Azteach- that is exactly what they do here. An English teacher was taking a year off and it was at a place I had subbed for a lot. They cut the budget so they are only hiring a part time teacher and must be moving kids into classes that are already too big. This state is a joke.
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:56 AM
 
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I also think that many positions are posted due to legal rules.butvare not actually available due to the position already being filed by internal candidates or someone who is already known to them. Then you have a.bunch of charter school openings which have low pay and terrible working conditions for the most part. There are 3 local charters that are great but just as hard to get into due to low turnover. The others are corporate type charters that I wouldn't waste my time with because I would.just look into admin asst jobs for the same or.more pay.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:20 PM
 
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applesaucencer No doubt internal hiring reigns supreme! We have some nice charter schools here, but the main ones that would be most likely to hire me based on my experience can't because of my lack of K-5 certification. Which is also one of the few areas you cannot add via a cert test -___-

I have no idea why districts think it's possible to mismanage funds, cut positions, not back up teacher discipline, increase class sizes, cut art/music/PE/foreign language and still somehow increase student engagement and test scores. And yet they always find the money for some newest "initiative" or "program." You know, the one they will replace in a year or two! Modern snake oil. It's madness.

Azteach88, I have seen the same thing happen in one of our larger districts. Switched a ton of positions to "part time" in order to save money. Seems like a ploy to hire people for part-time, give them full-time loads, shift them around, and blacklist them if they complain<_< Ugh.

Maybe they are "testing the waters" with the teachers in these part-time jobs or expecting them to become full-time jobs again later, but I don't see it.

I do want to know when districts started hiring (non-connected, non-related to school board member or principal) newbies to save money. Is this standard in your state or district? I was a newbie years ago and couldn't even get an interview in like 90% of the OTP districts. Out of 100+ schools I put in apps with, I got a small private school, a charter school, and maybe one or two public schools. No offers.

Funny story, I was approached halfway through my advanced degree with an offer to teach in Denver, Colorado. This was when CO was hiring teachers like CRAZY. I turned it down because my courses wouldn't transfer. I sometimes wonder what could have happened had I said yes and moved...
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:36 PM
 
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There is a glut of teachers in many areas, but not in urban and rural districts. For better districts there are the recent college graduates applying as well as teachers from lesser districts and private schools that pay less.
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:55 AM
 
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LyraS, I noticed the hiring of newbies for money $$ savings about 5ish years ago and it has since become standard practice. The crazy thing is that non-renewals have also skyrocketed. I know one school non-renewed 8 newbie teachers this year. Eight! And that is out of about 50-55 teachers. Clearly, the this hiring trend isn't very good or efficient. So, how are they saving money when they have to waste all that time and resources on onboarding new hires? But, with 8 new teachers needed, they will want people low on the salary scale because that can mean a savings of over 100k and probably closer to 200k by not having to pay teachers who have 6-8 years or more of experience.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:53 AM
 
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applesaucencr, geez, it's like I (and my former cohort) can't win. When I graduated as a newbie years ago, NO ONE was hiring newbies unless they were related/married/engaged to someone in the school or on the school board. Now that I have experience, districts are hiring newbies??? Umm....not sure how to NOT have experience now

I read a book a while back on the "gig" economy and the trends of "part time" and "half-time" and "non-renewal" and "new initiative/program ever 1-3 years" in education SCREAMS gig economy. Employers demand 110% from you yet will not give you 1%. They think nothing of dumping you for petty reasons. And non-renewed people are scrambling to explain gaps in employment to admin who got cushy jobs thirty years ago and had have nothing but job security and promotion (or could switch positions easily). All THAT in an economy where is costs major money to relocate, while ALSO trying to work out health care, retirement, debt/loans, and insurance.

And also as you mentioned, skyrocketing non-renewals make no sense financially, because they're just going to have to hire another newbie and pay to train them. And schools with high turnover typically don't end up having the best test scores....just saying...

The status of modern education makes me sick sometimes. They're dismantling the things that lured people to education in the first place-steady benefits, job stability, reasonable admin and parental support, teaching autonomy-and expecting the same results. The blood has been squeezed out of the teacher turnips and they have shriveled up.

Sorry to get off-topic, but hey, all it does is confirm my assumptions that the "teacher shortage" (with the possible exceptions of high school math/science, tech ed, bilingual ed, and SPED, and schools in super urban/rural areas) is GARBAGE. Teaching in any decent district or school is competitive and will be for the foreseeable future. The online articles and news stories should tell the truth about the "shortage" and stop giving teacher candidates false hope.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:40 PM
 
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Lyra,
I teach in the metro Atlanta area. I went to a job fair of a very sought after district on a whim to see what was out there. It was definitely a cattle call for teachers. My cousin also went with me. She emailed the individual principals whenever an opening appeared that she was qualified for. She got interviews and was hired. I really think you have to reach out to the individual principals.
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:16 AM
 
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Thanks for the heads up, Oreocat! I had a family emergency that forced me to skip multiple job fairs. It gives me a bit more hope now. I will continue to apply and put my name out there

Good luck to everyone North, South, East, and West on your job searches! Would love to hear how y'all are progressing and what the job situation is like in your area.
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