Surface Dyslexia - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Surface Dyslexia

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Thing 1's Avatar
Thing 1 Thing 1 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member

Thing 1
 
Thing 1's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member
Surface Dyslexia
Old 01-29-2008, 07:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I have a new student that is joining my caseload. She was certified today as LD. She is a 2nd grade student who is surface dyslexic; she has a visual processing problem. I will be using reading windows, raised paper, and an alpha smart with her but I was wondering if anyone had any other teaching strategies for this form of dyslexia. Any ideas would be warmly welcomed.
Thank you !


Thing 1 is offline   Reply With Quote

bis4betsy bis4betsy is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 319
Full Member

bis4betsy
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 319
Full Member
??
Old 02-01-2008, 12:16 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

what do you mean by "surface" dyslexia? I've never heard this term.
bis4betsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Thing 1's Avatar
Thing 1 Thing 1 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member

Thing 1
 
Thing 1's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member
An answer to ???
Old 02-01-2008, 09:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Surface dyslexia is a visuospatial perceptual disorder. The symptoms of surface dyslexia relate to making mistakes where the rules of English are not consistent. This is marked by the inability to read words by sight; these individuals read words only by sounding them out phonologically. For example, pretty is read as if it rhymed with “jetty”, and bowl is read as if it rhymed with “howl”.

Students with this form of dyslexia also have boundry issues and tend to invade other's personal space and don't realize that they are doing so, hence the visual perception problem.

This form of dyslexia is usually a result of a specific lesion in the posterior/parietal region in the brain.

I had never heard of it either until this child was added to my caseload.
Thing 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
bis4betsy bis4betsy is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 319
Full Member

bis4betsy
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 319
Full Member

Old 02-02-2008, 11:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Most of those issues sound like dyslexia, which is just difficulty with reading, not boundary issues. That sounds more psychological. Did the parents tell you she had to use the reading windows & raised paper? What is her primary disability and who gave the diagnosis? Did she/does she have a lesion in her brain? I believe teaching someone with brain injury puts a whole different spin on the subject.

My suggestions for helping her with reading would be to assess her and see what sound to symbol and symbol to sound knowledge she has and start there. Show her a letter card and ask her what sound does it make. Next, give her a sound and ask her to write down the letter that makes that sound. If she doesn't know the sounds of letters no reading window is going to help her.

Then start teaching her sounds in a systematic, explicit, consistent, multi-sensory way. Have her practice tracing the letters in a tray with salt while she says the name/sound. Use different colored 1 inch squares and have her pull down one colored square for each sound in a word, example: cat has 3 sounds so 3 different squares. Then practice blending those sounds together by saying the word very slowly, drag it out "C---A---T. Use CVC words at first to really build a solid base of each letter has it's own sound.

Does she use an Alpha Smart because her handwriting is illegible?
It sounds like a challenge!
bis4betsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Thing 1's Avatar
Thing 1 Thing 1 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member

Thing 1
 
Thing 1's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member

Old 02-03-2008, 08:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

It was the psychologist and his tests that determined the form of dyslexia that she has. Because it is a visual perception problem it does include boundry issues. We will be using reading windows and raised paper and I don't know if she has a brain lession or not. This child scored well with her word attack skills and her sound,symbol, symbol sound recognition. She does reverse D & B. I plan on testing her reading level on Monday when she starts. I was just wondering if anyone had worked with a student like this before. I had never heard of surface dyslexia until this week. Thanks for your suggestions; I appreiciate them.


Thing 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
lisandom lisandom is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 7
New Member

lisandom
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 7
New Member
Surface dyslexia
Old 02-12-2008, 02:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Ususally OTs have strategies for working with students with this type of disability. Check out hte Dyslexia society of America. They usally have great resources/info/links on their website.
lisandom is offline   Reply With Quote
lakeviewSPED lakeviewSPED is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 94
Full Member

lakeviewSPED
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 94
Full Member
dyslexia
Old 03-07-2008, 10:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I, too, have never heard of 'surface dyslexia' but ... from your descripion, she sounds like she has trouble with some reversals, and a perception problem. My daughter and son are both dyslexic, and have perceptual problems. I used a lot of clay with my daughter...she started by creating the alphabet in clay to remove distortions, then moved on to sight words. She still sometimes reverses D and B, especially when she's struggling with her 'point' (focus or concentration). When we clay the sight words, she has to create a model of what the word means to her along with the letters in the words, that seems to really help her visualize the word as she reads it.

You've had her in your class for a few weeks now, how is she doing? I have a lot of info. that I can send your way if you are interested.

lakeviewSPED
lakeviewSPED is offline   Reply With Quote
vbubbles1874's Avatar
vbubbles1874 vbubbles1874 is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 147
Full Member

vbubbles1874
 
vbubbles1874's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 147
Full Member
Son with Dyslexia?
Old 05-12-2008, 07:34 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I am curious about testing for dyslexia. I have a 7 year-old son who I believe is dyslexic. I called a p/t conference about 2 months ago and asked the literacy specialtist and school counselor to sit in too. I brought my concerns to them and even showed them examples. They all said that he was too young and would not test him for a learning disability until the 2nd or 3rd grade. Everything that I have read about dyslexia suggests that he be tested and begin tutoring before the age of 10.

He struggles daily with reading and is still at a beginning reading level even though he will complete the 1st grade in 3 weeks. I am very concerned that he is being over looked. His teacher keeps saying that he just needs to practice reading and they want him to go to summer school.

We try to get him to read, but he just won't do it. The reading assignments that she sends home are what they did in class that day. He memorizes entire episodes of Spongbob...of course he can memorize a 10 page book.

What do I do now?????
vbubbles1874 is offline   Reply With Quote
Thing 1's Avatar
Thing 1 Thing 1 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member

Thing 1
 
Thing 1's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 632
Senior Member
Be Pro Active with Psychologists & Dyslexia
Old 05-14-2008, 04:00 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

A lot of psychologists beloeve that most learning problems in 1st grade are develeopmental. However, I beleieve that is not always true. Waiting until a child gets to 2nd or 3rd grade can be a huge dis-service to the child's learning. It can cause high frustration levels and other problematic behaviors. The child continues to fall behind as the year progresses and their sel esteem begins to dwindle.
As the parent, you have total control over who and when your child will be tested. You start with the teacher and if you don't get what you want move on up the ladder to the principal. If that doesn't work, contact your Special or Student Services department and put your concerns in writing. State "The _____________________ school district is refusing to educate my child " CC in the Superintdent too. That will get their attention and get the process moving.
I am a SPED teacher & a parent of an LD dyslexic child. I had to do the samething to get my kiddo tested.
Since the end of the year is here, make sure your child is tested 1st thing in the fall.
Good luck!
Thing 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
vbubbles1874's Avatar
vbubbles1874 vbubbles1874 is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 147
Full Member

vbubbles1874
 
vbubbles1874's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 147
Full Member
update
Old 05-14-2008, 12:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I spoke with the school counselor yesterday and she recommended that we wait to have him tested until NEXT spring. I am so not ok with that. He already has self-contorl issues at home and at school. He is already displaying self-esteem issues. I just don't want him to get so frustrated that he starts "checking" out. He has alot of energy and he is very smart. I just don't want him to struggle. As a parent I am sure that you understand.

Thank you for your advice. I really appreciate it.


vbubbles1874 is offline   Reply With Quote
Mango's Avatar
Mango Mango is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 179
Full Member

Mango
 
Mango's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 179
Full Member

Old 05-14-2008, 03:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I have just a comment to vbubbles: According to new research by Dr. Sally Shawitz (sp), dyslexia can be spotted much earlier than 1st and 2nd grades. Usually there are certain signs that are pre-reading and writing. For example, not being able to repeat/sound a rhyme. The book is called Overcoming Dyslexia and is a result of a massive research project. I don't have my copy here or I would look up more information for you. I'd push for early testing, too.
Mango is offline   Reply With Quote
xyz123
 
 
Guest

xyz123
 
 
Guest
Parent
Old 06-18-2008, 08:08 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Hi,
My son was diagnosed with surface dyslexia, and has made great improvemnt in the last 6months. We have used flash cards for the non phonetic words, and use menomics for others.

His writing is very slow, and he does not leave spaces between the words. We have been using the book "write start" by Ion Teodorescu & Lois M Addy. The improvment has been obvious.

Hope this helps
  Reply With Quote
rosieteaches rosieteaches is offline
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 637
Senior Member

rosieteaches
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 637
Senior Member
just an opinion
Old 06-18-2008, 12:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I had a meeting with a distraught parent last week, end of third grade for her child. She was so angry that little progress was being made regarding her daughter's decoding skills. My son is dyslexic, age 17, so I have some experience but my opinion is just based on speculation.

Students who are dyslexic don't learn best with traditional teaching methods. Orton Gillingham, 2x a week, made a positive difference for my son when he was in the sixth grade. Our teachers are not trainied in OG or Wilson. Even the ones who are had abbreviated training and their schedules usually aren't adjusted easily enough for them to give that specialized attention to a child who is dyslexic.

Because most of our teachers are not trained, and their schedules are so tight, I beleive special educators put this issue on the back burner. Parents while it's summer see if you can learn more about these two specialized programs.
rosieteaches is offline   Reply With Quote
justread
 
 
Guest

justread
 
 
Guest
Re: surface dyslexia
Old 01-14-2009, 08:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I am a reading instruction specialist and have worked with children who have been diagnosed with dyslexia (surface and other types) as well as students who have many other LDs. In my experience, intensive phonetic instruction is the most successful remediation strategy. Unfortunately, the many so-called phonics-based programs used in our schools barely scratch the surface of true phonetic instruction. The Orton Gillingham method mentioned previously is a good program, as is the Academic- Associates Reading Course. Because classroom teachers haven't been trained in this type of instruction, outside intervention is preferable. My recommendation to any parent of a child who is struggling with reading is DON'T WAIT! The earlier the intervention begins, the faster your child will catch up to grade level and progress. Students reading below their grade level lack significantly in their knowledge base and it is more difficult to close that gap the older a child is.
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:35 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net