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molliemarie
 
 
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molliemarie
 
 
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behavior problems with special ed students
Old 01-27-2006, 02:06 PM
 
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I am in need of some desperate help and advice. I have been teaching students in special ed for two years now (my first teaching job ever). I teach k-12 life skills for more of the severe students. The have two students right now that I am having major behavior problems with. One has autism and the other is down syndrome both in 6th grade but really low functioning. They are both spitting. At anytime you tell them to do something and they don't want to do it they will spit in your face, at me, my para, who ever it is. I have tried all the discipline that I can thank of and nothing is working. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions?


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Tiffany74 Tiffany74 is offline
 
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Tiffany74
 
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Also in need of help!
Old 01-30-2006, 03:26 PM
 
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I have a 6th grader who is constantly defying me, talking back, singing during class, etc. I have emailed mom almost daily and it sounds like she is at her wits end with her too! (Parents are going through a divorce). She is not terribly low ability wise (probably shouldn't be on an IEP but we have very loose qualification standards). My thought is maybe she needs to be challenged but when I give her that work she doesn't know how to do it.

I have tried giving her points and redeeming them, talking to her about her behavior (daily), but nothing is working. Any thoughts???
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soniat
 
 
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soniat
 
 
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spitting doesn't go away with discipline...
Old 01-30-2006, 06:12 PM
 
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i've worked with kids who spit for five years now, and i've learned the hard way that having a specific disciplinary reaction for spitting--ANY reaction--just doesn't work. It's such a deviant behavior that we can't help but respond emotionally, and our response itself is reinforcing ("Wow--I made the teacher turn purple/jump back/yell...")

Hard as it is, just point at the trash can, say "spit there next time" in a very nonchalant voice, and get on with whatever the issue is that started the spitting. IE guide child through the worksheet they're protesting, point out upcoming fun activity that follows less-fun demand, etc. Only when a child realizes that
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sonia t
 
 
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sonia t
 
 
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sorry--wasn't finished!
Old 01-30-2006, 06:14 PM
 
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yeah, like i was saying, only when a child realizes that
A) Spitting doesn't accomplish anything and
B) (Desirable behavior) is much more effective

will the spitting die down.

Icky, isn't it? Spitting is my absolute least favorite behavior. Oh, except biting.

Hang in there!
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coolaide
 
 
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coolaide
 
 
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behavior problems
Old 02-21-2006, 06:25 PM
 
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I work as an aide in a severly /profoundly handicaped classroom. I have a student with Autism who will pull your clothing, try to bite ,scratch,and pull hair. The only tatic that works for us is to take away an activity that she likes. For example, We will not take her walking, or we will turn off the T.V.(enjoys Winniie the Pooh). I have tried seperating her by herself for a few minutes. This only works sometimes.


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Helping Hand
 
 
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Helping Hand
 
 
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The Defiant Child
Old 03-08-2006, 08:42 AM
 
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I sympathise with you on the child in your classroom who is defiant. I taught for many years children with emotional problems. I based the classroom on rewarding the appropriate behaviors. DO this...It will work.... WHen a child did something inappropriate, I totally ignored the behavior, unless they could injure themselves or other children. I would just walk by them like they were invisible. After all, they are acting this way to get your attention. Give your attention to those who are on task. I once had a student runing on the counters screaming. I could have ran to him and pull him down to saftey or let him continue till he realised he would not get the attention he wanted. Finally, he jumped down and sat n his seat. As if nothing happened, I walke dover to him as he started back to work. He NEVER did it again. Like so many other behaviors, if you give them attention to the negative, they will coninute to push the envelope till you respond. You must remember....immediately stop what you are doing and pay attention when they are doing anything positive. It might be a second just be on top of it and reward with a simple acknowledgement of he/she on task.
I applied the positives rewards and ignored all negatives in the room. The classroom worked great cause as pleasers, they would finally relise that they would get my attention on the positives not the negatives. It was better all around.

Good Luck
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