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dimaz9 dimaz9 is offline
 
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MayClarification-which direction to take?
Old 01-27-2006, 04:19 PM
 
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Ive been reading about these inclusion classes that people have been writing about-----Is this considered a reg. ed position? I assumed an inclusion class was taught by a reg. ed teacher and special ed teachers came in and worked with certain students collaboratively with the classroom teacher, etc...

Anyway----I have been teaching in a self contained room for 8 years...thinking of going into reg. ed or higher level of special ed....Id love to do language arts.....do you need a separate degree for lang. arts? Do I have any chance of getting into a setting with reg. ed students?
Im interested in elem. and middle school level..Thanks for the help...


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Inclusion/teaching other types of classes
Old 01-27-2006, 04:37 PM
 
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Hi! Inclusion classes can be managed in quite a few different ways, including the idea of a reg. ed. teacher with a spec. ed. teacher coming in to work together for certain periods of the day. In the best case scenario for that type of inclusion, the spec. ed. teacher helps *every* child that needs it, not just strictly the spec. ed. kids (while keeping a close eye on the kids with IEPs). Everyone benefits. Another form of inclusion class is when one teacher, with spec. ed. certification, teaches a mixed group of spec. ed. and reg. ed. kids together, with no additional teacher, or with an aide. That can be tough, but with differentiated instruction, it can be successful. Then there's classes in which a spec. ed. teach and a reg. ed. teacher plan and teach and co-exist together all day long. In this case, the best-case scenario is the kids not really realizing that one teacher is reg. ed. and one is spec. ed.; instead, they figure they're in a class with two teachers.

Regarding your second question, it's my understanding that most middle school teachers now need to be 'highly qualified' (according the NCLB law) to teach the content area/areas that they teach. Becoming highly qualified can vary by state, though, and can be as simple as pulling out your college transcript and proving you took 'x' hours of a certain subject. You may also be able to be highly qualified by taking Praxis or similar tests. Check your state's website, or call the state Dep't. of Ed. to learn more.

Hope this helps.
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interesting
Old 01-28-2006, 09:25 AM
 
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Hey, thanks a lot for the info. and response...

That does help...The inclusion pieces sound interesting, and challenging.
Do you know of anyone that has gone from spec. ed. to reg. ed without a problem? My gut feeling and from speaking with just a couple of others, it seems like it might be very difficult...(The inclusion piece could be another option though...)
Thanks again, Diana
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To answer your question.....
Old 01-31-2006, 03:27 PM
 
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no, I can't think of anyone off the top of my head that has switched from spec. ed. to reg. ed. However, I know quite a few dually-certified teachers (myself included). My colleagues and I move easily among our special ed. and reg. ed. students on a daily basis. I'm a spec. ed. teacher by title, but I could teach a class full of reg. ed. students just as well. I guess the obvious difference would be larger classes and a faster pace in general. On the other hand, there's less paperwork (well, IEP/goal type- you would probably have more papers to grade) and IEP meetings. ALL students benefit from differentiated instruction, so a good spec. ed. teacher can be a good reg. ed. teacher.
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