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Annml
 
 
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Art Activities for Autistic Children
Old 02-15-2006, 01:32 PM
 
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Hi,

I am a paraprofessional in an autistic classroom. This is a new experience for me. Does anyone have any suggestions for art projects or themes that you might use in your classroom?

Thank you


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See this book
Old 02-24-2006, 07:06 PM
 
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We used Evan-Moor's book called "Art for All Seasons." It has a lot of really cute ideas. The kids really enjoy this, and love to take their artwork home.
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dramacentral dramacentral is offline
 
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Old 02-26-2006, 06:42 AM
 
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Autism is a wide spectrum, so what is right for one child or classroom might not be for another. I do have a few general suggestions, based on my time teaching autistic preschoolers.

Art is a great opportunity to introduce sensory activities that the kids might benefit from. My little ones really liked finger paint and model magic clay. They could mush it around and feel it on their fingers. They hated things that stuck to their fingers or that smelled strongly. Some of them could learn how the use the material from watching a demonstration, while others needed me to take their hands and go through the motions of using the material so that they could "feel" what they were supposed to do.

Some of my students quickly got obsessive, doing the same picture or motions over and over again. To snap them out of it, I gave them different materials, or a different surface to use.

Some of the kids had a hard time drawing and cutting within lines. I wanted them to learn how to develop their fine motor skills, not really for artistic purposes. But they liked being given things to cut or color in with raised outlines done in white glue, to allow them to "feel" where the boundaries were. (An OT suggested that one to me and it really worked!)

Many autistics like putting puzzles together. Perhaps you could get those blank puzzles and have them color or draw on them, then take the pieces apart and reassemble.

Hope this helped!
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Easy and Fun for Autistic kids
Old 02-26-2006, 10:40 AM
 
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I teach Autistic Support...this project works across spectrums...

All you need is a pencil, some plain light colored paper (yellow, white,
manila, etc.) and a variety of those BINGO markers..if you have a Dollar
Store nearby, you can get them there. They have a round sponge tip
and come in all colors.

With pencil, draw something simple on the paper...shapes are always
a good choice...have each kid "dot" along the pencil drawing to make
a "picture"....this activity also strengthens hand/eye coordination,
tracking and directionality skills.

TRELLIS
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sensory activities for autistic children
Old 10-06-2008, 11:08 PM
 
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Here are some of the sensory activities we do in my classroom that some of the kids really enjoy or hate when first introduced and then really enjoy. Remember its important to encourage your kiddos to touch and experience things even if they don't like it at first. If your child has serios aversions to certain textures or activities introduce it and repeat it again at later times to get them used to it.
Shaving cream:
squirt a mound of shaving cream on the table and let the kids swirl it around and make letters, their names, shapes, ect.
Cooked Speghetti:
Similar idea, let the kids play with cold cooked spaghetti noodles on the table making shapes, thier names, whatever. Another idea is to have laminated drawing of shapes to have the kids try and copy with the noodles.
Rubbing Stencils:
Stencils with raised pictures on them that can be put under a sheet of paper and the kids can rub crayons over the paper to see the image.
Stamps:
Rubber, sponge letters/shapes, potato, whatever just dip in paint and dap away!


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Alma N.
 
 
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:25 PM
 
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Hi...I've been teaching children with autism age 3-6 years old for almost five years now. And i've discovered a lot of art activities that can help them in their fine, psycho motor, cognitive and communication or language domains. What you need are the following materials ( for the sunflower art project )

1. paper plates
2. dotted paints (to reduce frustration and to teach coloring or
painting within boundaries : the easiest way)
3. construction paper (pre-cut: (yellow -5 pcs for the petals -1 inch
wide and 5-6 inches long; green - 5 pcs of same size for the
leaves; 6 pcs-brown of same size for the pollen and flower pot )
4. popcycle sticks
5. scissors
6. glue

Steps:

1. Ask the child to paint the paper plate first (Ideally light blue for the background). Ask him to sing with you " boundaries, boundaries...." while painting. Keep the rest of the materials out of reach to reduce distraction. Give two colors for him to choose. Say "which one do you like? yellow or red?" Make him say the color and ask him to say "give me ____ please". Ask him atleast 3 to 4 times while pointing at the dotted paint "what color?" to make him learn and say the color.

2. When he's done painting, set aside to dry. When its dried enough to write, draw using a pencil or any light color a flower for the child to use as guide. Draw 5 petals with a circle at the center, a stem where he can paste the popcycle stick ,2 opposite leaves where he can paste the green strips of paper and a pot at the bottom to place the brown paper. This would guide and help him know where to place the cut papers.

3. Right after painting, give the child the green and brown strips and make him cut it into small pieces. Set aside. Paste both ends of the yellow strip (all 5 of them ) and set aside.

4. When the painted paper plate has dried enough, ask him to paste the cut brown papers at the circle part of the flower. Model first them provide physical assistance to avoid frustrations. Give praise such as "wow, very nice, good job etc. " all the time to motivate him to do more.

5. Ask him to paste the 5 petals around the circle or pollen. Keep on praising and providing physical assistance or gesture. Point to the different colors and ask him to say it.

6. Ask him to paste the stick at the center part of the flower, the strips of green paper to the leaves and the brown paper strips at the flower pot.

7. Write on the lower part his dotted name and ask him to trace it.

8. Dont forget to hang it for the visitors to see. Make him feel proud of his work by asking him to hang it himself. Give praise and pat his shoulder while saying..."Im proud of you _____....good job!!!!!"

Alma
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