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Need Help - 1st Grade Intervention
Old 02-17-2015, 12:07 PM
 
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Hello all. I need your expertise. I am trying everything I know how to help two of my first graders in reading. I cannot get these girls off of a Level B guided reading book. hey were in Level A all year in kindergarten with no growth and now they are on level B all year in 1st Grade. I am supposed to move them at least 5 levels this year to meet my SLO goal, but I know this is not going to happen. I just want to help them, but I don't know what else to do. There is little or no help at home unfortunately. We do not have an intervention reading program to use at my school and the resources are limited. One of the two receives special education services as well as Title 1 reading. I meet with them in small group every single day. If anyone out there has any advice at all, please post back. I would really appreciate any help/advice/suggestions. Thank you so much.


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A few thoughts
Old 02-17-2015, 01:45 PM
 
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1. Can't you adjust your SLO goal mid year? We can if we have reason to believe students can't make the goal set at beginning of the year. What about the one who is special ed? Certainly 5 levels is an inappropriate goal.
2. How are they doing with sight words? Mastering those would be helpful.
3. Only have them read books with controlled vocabulary. In other words, the text contains the sight words and phonics rules covered to date and if there are one or two "other words" just introduce those as "story words."
4. Do they show any signs of dyslexia? I would have the other student re-evaluated through your Intervention and Referral Services Team. Something is not right.
5. Perhaps reach out to the community, parents or senior citizens to come in and listen to them read and to read with them for extra practice...maybe make it "Adopt a Grandparent" for any of your students.
It seems to me that something is very wrong and beyond your control...get your special ed department involved. Good luck!
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Thank you Iris
Old 02-17-2015, 03:43 PM
 
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1.) No. Unfortunately, we are unable to adjust our goal. We were told what the goal had to be and all teachers on that grade level had to use the same one. I agree that 5 levels seems unrealistic for a student with an IEP. My SLO is written so that 70% of my students meet the goal.

2. They are not doing well with sight words. The one girl has not even mastered the pre-primer words. The other one is slightly higher and is working to master the first grade list. I use the Rainbow Words program to help motivate them to master sight words. We review words at the beginning of each guided reading group and use flashcards. They also do computer programs to help them. It is as if they do not apply the words in context when they are reading. It is so strange to me. One day they will recognize a word and then the next day, they do not. Any suggestions???

4. I agree with you...something is NOT right. The girl who does not have an IEP right is currently working with our School Psychologist. She told me that the little girl will not qualify for services this year. The other little just barely qualified this year. I just don't understand how these students who are struggling so badly cannot qualify for special services. It saddens me. I have reached out to the speech therapist to possibly screen both girls. If you have anything else to share, I would be grateful. Honestly, I am doing everything I know how to do...using best practices daily and nothing is working right now. By the way, I teach a high population of economically disadvantaged students.
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Here's an activity
Old 02-17-2015, 03:54 PM
 
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my first graders enjoy...give them real or pretend magnifying glasses and big books. Let them work with a partner to search for the week's spelling or sight words in the books. Have them record the words they find.
Then, anytime they are reading independently such as Daily 5 time, ask them to keep track of those words. They can write the word and then use tally marks to keep track of how often they see it again. I've found that my kids run up to me to say "Look! I just found the contraction "won't!"
Maybe it will help or in the very least, engage them in becoming familiar with the words.
Good luck.
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Take a Step Back
Old 02-19-2015, 05:26 AM
 
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If these girls spent kindergarten in level A and first grade in level B, perhaps there are prereading things (kindergarten sort of things) they don't know...letter sounds, letter recognition, whether words rhyme or don't rhyme, if two words begin with the same sound or don't begin with the same sound, location of a certain sound in a word (beginning, middle, end), etc.

Take a step back and see if you can find any "holes" that need filling.

I would imagine you have them listening to books on CD, have older students/adult volunteers reading to them, playing phonics games involving letter sounds and recognition with volunteers or older students, a book box with books they can read, etc.

It does sound like these students might have a learning problem. Thanks for working hard to assist them.


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Good ideas here
Old 02-19-2015, 07:56 PM
 
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I might add a few ideas.

Do a fairly detailed book walk, planting the key words and sentence structure in their minds and then have them read. At this point, you want them to match the words already in their heads to the print on the page, rather than having them figuring out the words and sentence patterns.

Is their vocabulary adequate for the text? I had some ELLs who were reading Level C at the end of first grade causing much rejoicing. They finally learned enough English and literacy skills to actually read. Even if your students are English Only they may not have the vocabulary or "book/sentence structure" to anticipate what they are reading.

Have they had their vision checked? I had a kid who kept breaking his glasses (put them behind the car's tire so his mom ran them over!!!) and was finally able to start reading when I took him aside and hung a magnifying glass around his neck. When he began to read, he stopped breaking his glasses.

Hope some of this helps.

Just remember: since kids walk when they are ready, talk when they are ready, they also read when they are ready regardless of standards, state and federal laws, and teacher evaluations.
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:15 PM
 
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I see that broomrider already mentioned developmental levels. I was going to ask how old these girls are. I know that while "redshirting" is popular in higher SES areas, in low SES communities children tend to be younger when they start kindergarten. If these girls are younger than their peers, they simply may not be ready to read at the level expected of them. And I agree with the advice to make sure skills weren't missed in kinder.

For a long time I was really frustrated when reading with my daughter. She would decode a word and then forget it by the time it showed up on the next page. I would think, "You just read that word! WHY can't you remember it?" Well, she's in first grade now and reading really well. I didn't do anything differently-- she was just READY this year. Meanwhile her friend was reading chapter books at age 4. They're just different. I'm sure you know that, and knowing that doesn't help you to meet state-mandated goals. It's such a struggle.

Last edited by Sariana; 02-19-2015 at 08:17 PM.. Reason: Stupid auto-correct!
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