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AnonSPEDteach AnonSPEDteach is offline
 
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SLPs and school psychs drive me nuts
Old 10-24-2021, 06:29 PM
 
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Why do these people always think they know everything? Iím SPED and have never taught GE, but I know waaaaay better than to pretend to know how to do a GE teacherís job. Every time I meet with SLP and school psych, it turns into a discussion about someoneís faulty classroom management style, and why canít the teacher handle this kid with explosive behaviors, blah blah. Or if only that teacher would build a better relationship, maybe that kid (who had tons of issues even in preschool) would stop punching people, ripping up bulletin boards, smearing poop in the bathroom, etc. I get tired of listening to them because it is so condescending and Iím sure they wouldnít even last an hour teaching in some of these classrooms!


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I have known the type you speak of...
Old 10-24-2021, 07:06 PM
 
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They seriously just do not have a clue.
One used to really get on my nerves, but I finally came to terms with she has no idea and thinks she is right.
It can be really annoying though for sure!
I wish they'd be forced to teach at least 3 yrs before trying to give their opinions.
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Donít Worry
Old 10-25-2021, 03:15 AM
 
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Those types exist in every branch of education. It would be way more helpful to coach people who need it or offer suggestions that work with students who struggle with those things. Trashing the teachers doesnít help and Iím sure it makes spending time with those two really unpleasant.

Iíve gotten into the habit of mentioning something positive about the teacher - it often stops the trash talk, because they either a) realize you donít agree and *may* take it back to that person, or b) realize theyíre being j professional.
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Old 10-25-2021, 03:53 AM
 
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Part of the trouble is this type often jumps to conclusions or forms impressions in the absence of any context or background. They like to think, “I KNOW this kid” even if “I don’t know THIS kid.” Putting a difficult kid in a quiet office with someone who is not a disciplinarian and out of view of any peers to “perform” for, they can appear perfectly charming and compliant. The kid may even see a half hour with a psychologist or SLP as a sort of respite from the expectations of the classroom and behave accordingly. Add to this that many kids lap up the individual attention lavished on them in these sessions and want more of it.

It’s pretty rich for a person who spends half an hour to an hour once every couple of weeks with a kid in a quiet office to judge an educator who is responsible for teaching, grading, and maintaining discipline for the same student for 6 hours a day five days a week in a class of 25 or more students.

Add to this that when difficult kids are accompanied by difficult parents, the parents are always “selling” a narrative about their kid to whomever will listen. It almost always includes blaming the school and classroom teachers for their kids’ challenges and sidestepping any parent or student accountability. These parents move from person to person in the system (admin, psych, school counselor, SLP, etc.) trying to frame their kid as a victim of poor teaching and uncaring classroom educators, always hopeful the person to whom they are speaking will simply buy what they are selling and won’t investigate the context or background.

Unfortunately, for reasons I can’t fathom, a significant number do accept the parent’s narrative over the teacher’s. I think it’s because a lot of non-classroom types sit in rosy towers and never lose their Pollyanna outlook and so are eager to believe any narrative that frames unsuccessful kids as victims of the system or of mean or lazy teachers. And like I say, if the kid comes into the quiet office and smiles shyly and politely and is compliant, they sure look a lot more (in THAT context, and this is key) like the kid the parent is describing than the one the teacher is describing.
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Old 10-25-2021, 04:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Part of the trouble is this type often jumps to conclusions or forms impressions in the absence of any context or background. They like to think, ďI KNOW this kidĒ even if ďI donít know THIS kid.Ē Putting a difficult kid in a quiet office with someone who is not a disciplinarian and out of view of any peers to ďperformĒ for, they can appear perfectly charming and compliant.
Angelo said it perfectly!

I taught in a urban low socioeconomic Title 1 school, sometimes I had students who needed more support/services than my GenEd/inclusion classroom could reasonably offer. It was so frustrating when Admin or others would have this mindset. I was a teacher with strong classroom management, therefore often given challenging students ďbecause I could handle itĒ. Regarding the struggling student: of course I could be sweet and compliant to expectations if Iím given a treat, prize, or the gift if avoiding work.

Quote:
I get tired of listening to them because it is so condescending and Iím sure they wouldnít even last an hour teaching in some of these classrooms
OP: You hit the nail on the head. Itís unfortunate because of their attitude we miss out on truly brainstorming and working together.


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Get them to show you how
Old 10-25-2021, 10:58 AM
 
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I teach profoundly handicapped students. All of my students are developmently 4 yrs old or lower in adult sized bodies. Whenever they start spouting platitudes at me I request them to spend a week in my room showing me how to handle the problem. After they can't solve the problem, I don't hear from them again. I keep my students for 8 years so eventually we reach a compromise where the student gets the stimulation he needs and I get to keep a (somewhat) clean classroom.
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They Are High on Diagnosing!
Old 10-25-2021, 04:52 PM
 
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I taught a self-contained w/inclusion classroom for students in K-4. I was fortunate to work with some excellent psychologists and therapists, and I was also stuck working with a few of the type mentioned here.

In my district, the psych and therapist job descriptions included diagnose for psychs and diagnose/treat for therapists. One speech therapist let that go completely to her head; I think she viewed herself as the equivalent of a doctor!

I viewed the relationship between the psychs & therapists and the sped teacher as similar to a surgeon & medical doctor: their role was to pinpoint & treat the acute problem, and my role was to move the student from the acute treatment phase to the improved quality of life state. I never saw my role as inferior to theirs, because would any of us want to have surgery to correct a problem but then be unable to resume our normal lives?

I viewed them as having deep vertical knowledge of their respective fields, and I viewed myself as having broad horizontal knowledge of many types of disabilities and the associated behaviors those disabilities could manifest. Together, we were almost always able to move the student forward. Unfortunately, the know-it-all types almost always prevented any meaningful student progress simply from their own insecure egos.

It's a partnership!
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Old 10-26-2021, 07:51 AM
 
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I agree! I have had difficult students in my class throughout my career. I am at the point that I can manage students pretty well. I have a difficult student this year. Guidance counselors, social workers, behaviorist involved. Each person would take the student alone for 20-30 minutes to evaluate. Every one of them eventually told me they donít know how I do it all day with the child. Yup, and have 24 other kids and teach. I keep asking the professionals for guidance on how to help the child. Not one could add to what Iíve done. They would never be able to spend the entire day in my room. Iím still seeking help on how to help the child while evaluations continue.
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Old 10-26-2021, 08:27 AM
 
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Completely agree. I think Angelo has a lot of good insights into the situation.
I taught a kid a long time ago that I'm convinced has the potential to cause serious harm to himself and others (as in a school shooting type of situation). The academic and behavioral concerns were numerous.
We go into the IEP meeting with the parents largely on our side. We present our concerns.
After presenting the list of concerns, school social worker looks at us and asked straight-faced, "Do you think this is happening because he's gifted?'
No. No. There was absolutely nothing to indicate he had any degree of giftedness. None of the evaluations he'd been through had shown any indication. I've been lucky enough to be able to help identify several kids as gifted who were dually identified so I do try to keep an open mind for kids who are gifted and have autism, kids who are gifted and ELL learners, kids who are gifted and have learning disabilities. I don't discount giftedness simply because there are other concerns. There was absolutely nothing there to indicate that his concerns were from being gifted. I was so grateful for the reading specialist who jumped in and said something to the effect that we spent hours a day with the kid and tended to know him better and she hadn't even met him once.
The frustrating part is that it ended up derailing the kid from getting much needed help.
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