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Liz7627 Liz7627 is offline
 
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Liz7627
 
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Should I Teach/Crazy Workload?
Old 07-26-2018, 08:32 AM
 
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Hey everyone,

So I'm a currently a student who is going for my bachelor's in English (ik bad idea haha) but I would love to go for my masters in special education and get certified in MA. The problem is, I keep hearing all of these horror stories about teaching. I don't mind the crazy kids or the below average pay but I'm worried about the work load associated with teaching. I've read online that some teachers work 60+ hour weeks. They say that the amount of grading/IEPs/lesson planning consumes thier while life. While that's okay, one of the reasons I chose teaching was because it would be a 9-5 job and it would be a great job for when/if I have kids. I know the first year of teaching will be a lot (trying to form a curriculum) but is it always this bad? I'm afraid I'll burn out quickly. **Side note, my mom is a special education high school teacher in MA (what and where I want to teach) and she says she loves it and she dosent bring home crazy amounts of work. What have your experience been? Especially for teachers in MA? Thank you


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Teaching Pros/Cons
Old 07-27-2018, 09:59 AM
 
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While there are many great things about teaching: creating lessons, making connections with kids, summers/vacations and setting up your classroom, I honestly don't think that I would go into teaching (knowing what I know now). I have been teaching for 20 years in the general education classroom (changing grades). I feel like I have many tricks in my bag, but the work doesn't get easier. After awhile you may become more familiar with the curriculum, but will most likely want to change how you approach or teach lessons to make them work for the different types of students that you will encounter. I teach middle school ELA and the correcting part takes a huge amount of my time. When you have 75 research papers to correct it takes awhile to go through them and give thoughtful feedback. Something else that has been added is the teacher evaluation system. I have monthly walk throughs that I need to respond to, as well as SLOS that I have to work on, create pre/post assessments and log information onto a data network. You will spend time emailing parents on a regular basis. Teaching is not a 9-5 job. I always spend more than 8 hours a day in my classroom. I try to get to work by 6:30 and usually stay until 4:00--4:30. I spend Sundays getting ready for the upcoming week or correcting papers. I am expecting my first child this fall and I am worried about how I will do it all and be a mom. I know many people do it, but I don't know how they do it. Good luck with your decision, but think about what you are willing to sacrifice to be in the profession and what means the most to you.
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:02 AM
 
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9-5? More like go in 45 minutes before contract time and leave an hour after the kids go home.
I work the after school program and teach summer school to supplement my income because my health care benefits jumped up to $800 a month.
I always have things to bring home. I've been more selective as the years have gone on, but the first few years I brought home and worked at home for hours and every weekend.
There are so many more demands on us now. As a new teacher though, it will be your 'normal".
I didn't teach summer school when my kids were little because the trade off just wasn't worth it to me.
Good luck with whatever you decide. My own daughter is going to be a teacher too.
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:16 AM
 
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I am someone that doesn't work a ton outside of contract time, and I still would unfortunately not recommend going into teaching for anyone. Even though I only work about 45 hours per week most weeks, those 45 hours are extremely stressful and I am never really able to "turn off my brain" from thinking about work when I get home. Student behavior gets worse and worse every year, and we're not really allowed to give much in the way of real consequences.

Expectations and pressure also get worse every year. I have many students who have experienced severe trauma, don't know if there will be food or a place to sleep when they get home, who will pick them up today/if anyone will pick them up today, etc. yet nothing matters but their stupid DIBELS (how many words they can read in one minute) scores. If the student doesn't achieve it's the teacher's fault. No other factors are considered.

I'm a sped teacher. The expectations for sped are very unrealistic. My students are expected to perform exactly the same as students who don't have disabilities. Yet, the very definition of having a disability is that one isn't performing like typically developing peers. If the child magically does start achieving like a general education student, they are exited from sped and no longer "count" for me.

I also have to work with a lot more adults than most other teaching positions. I work with about 12 classroom teachers with differing and strong personalities. No matter what I do, someone is mad about it. There are a lot of legal hoops to jump through in order to identify a child with a disability, and many of the classroom teachers blame me for "slowing down the process" or "not wanting to take the child on" when I'm just following the legal parameters.

The burn out rate for sped teachers is 2 years for a reason. There are many sped openings everywhere for a reason. Yet many classroom teachers and even some admins think my job is easier than theirs, and sped never gets the respect that classroom teachers do- or the supplies/resources/materials/training for that matter.

As far as kids, I am child free by choice, but many teachers who I work with are parents and teaching isn't always the parent-friendly career people think it is. My teammate is always saying how she's missing things at her own child's school because she's working. Her husband's corporate job is much more flexible- he can leave and see a performance, spelling bee, go to a conference during the day, etc. Many other salaried jobs have a lot more freedom as far as what you can do/where you can go during the day.
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Don't do it!!
Old 08-10-2018, 05:46 PM
 
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I have been a teacher for 18 years. Didn't start teaching until I was 40. Personally, I wouldn't recommend ANYONE go into teaching anymore. Much to POLITICAL, back-stabbing, and NO job security! Not to mention the kids get harder and harder to teach each year and you get ZERO support from admin! Just my opinion.


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twin2 twin2 is offline
 
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Old 08-18-2018, 03:16 AM
 
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Another factor to consider is the possibility that it could take years to get hired into some school districts.
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