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Modifications for test
Old 04-15-2011, 04:37 PM
 
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I had a great day today, but one part of it was really upsetting.

I have an inclusive classroom, and I have 3 early emergent students in the classroom who cannot read test questions themselves.

The other teachers at my school feel that at this point in the school year, all first graders should be able to read test questions without accommodations, modifications, concessions...whatever you want to call it.

All these 3 students need is to have the questions read orally to them, they know the answers and can get all answers correct if they have the questions read to them.

Can anyone tell me why I was scolded by 4 people over this today?????

Seriously, am I wrong? These students cannot read yet, period. They are all really smart. Why am I being crucified for wanting them to succeed, and all I have to do is read a couple questions to help them out??

I am really frustrated in case you can't tell...and I have come to the conclusion that these teachers have a vendetta against one student in this group because of his behavior around them, mind you, he is always good for me.

Advice please??? All I want to do is help my students. Letting them fail a test every single week doesn't seem like the best thing for them.


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I'm with you
Old 04-15-2011, 04:48 PM
 
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I don't know why they are arguing with you over this, but kids begin to read at different rates. My ds as not a good reader at the end of first grade but by 2nd grade he was fine..My dd was a great reader. IMO if all they need is for you to read the test question (assuming you're talking about math?) then, seriously, why not? Set them up for success, not failure! Stick to your guns!
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What were you testing?
Old 04-15-2011, 04:50 PM
 
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Were you testing what reading level they are? Or were you testing their knowledge about a certain subject?

Some of my reg ed colleagues perform what I call "target practice" on certain students and it turns my stomach. 80% of the students are easy to teach- it's the other 20% that really needs those who truly care about educating them.
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what is the objective of the test?
Old 04-15-2011, 04:55 PM
 
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If they are inclusion children, testing modifications should be written in their IEPs. If you are testing ability to follow written directions, then you shouldn't be reading the questions. Or if you are testing their reading ability. But if you are testing comprehension, or another subject area, then what you are doing is fair. I don't know why a non-reader would have to take a reading test when you know they can't read- that sounds cruel to me.

Last edited by Munchkins; 04-15-2011 at 05:16 PM..
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Inclusion
Old 04-15-2011, 05:15 PM
 
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I teach an inclusion class as well. I read-aloud any non-reading based assignments/assessments. When I test on reading I try to modify the assignments by giving them lower level work that tests the same skills as everyone else. However, they are responsible for reading it themselves. Check their IEP. From what I know, you can't read-aloud when you're assessing reading.


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Old 04-15-2011, 06:06 PM
 
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It is a weekly reading comprehension that tests vocabulary from the week and comprehension of the story. We do a sample question all together, then they do the rest alone.

It is not a state test or a major assessment.

Their point is that it is "reading" and "comprehension" that they are being tested on.

I have 3 different levels of students. Early emergent, emergent, and early fluent.

Their math tests are a whole different story, I have to test in small groups and read and assist on every question with them.

Almost all of my students are allowed modifications but staff are telling me at this point in the year they are phasing out these mods.
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Old 04-15-2011, 06:46 PM
 
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If it's a test of reading ability, then the test shouldn't be read to them. I do help my students with individual words that they are struggling with on but don't read them the test. However, I wonder if even doing that is setting them up for failure since I can't help them at all on the FCAT. Are they receiving grade level work even though they are so far below grade level? Maybe that should be the place to start by giving them work on their level.
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since it's a reading test...
Old 04-16-2011, 04:07 AM
 
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I agree with your teammates that it shouldn't be read to them. My question is, why are they being given work that is above their level? If they are doing the work in reading class whole group to support them, they shouldn't even be given an assessment that they can't do. I say test them for reading and comprehension on their independent reading level. And, one more thing- thank you for caring so much about your students, and for being their advocate. That is the most important thing of all. Sounds like you are doing a great job, and those children are blessed to have you.
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Old 04-16-2011, 09:44 AM
 
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I know that it may not be the best idea to read a reading test to them, but I can't stant to see them struggle and get upset and think they can't do things. At this point, they can't read yet, plain and simple, but they will be able to one day, I know that. I'm just trying to do what I can for them to get them on the right track for their future. I think telling them to do it on their own when I KNOW they cannot at this time is just mean and I don't want to discourage them. I like the see them mark the right answer after I read the question and say "YOU ARE SO SMART!"

These 3 students have different work for reading throughout the week than the others that is below the other 13 students in class, but they are expected to take the same weekly reading comprehension test as the others...

Thank you, Munchkins, I appreciate that so much. I truly do love every student like they are my own children and want them to succeed.
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Old 04-16-2011, 09:55 AM
 
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Quote:
These 3 students have different work for reading throughout the week than the others that is below the other 13 students in class, but they are expected to take the same weekly reading comprehension test as the others...
Sorry, but this makes zero sense. I think you reading the test is besides the point. Are you the special ed. teacher? Do they have IEPs? If so, easy: give them modifications-take tests at instructional level.

Since they are too young for state tests (currently anyway) you don't have to worry about that yet, but they will have to take them someday, without you reading to them, so you do have to teach them some strategies for when the text is too difficult and prepare them. Life isn't fair .



Last edited by newspedteach; 04-16-2011 at 10:20 AM..
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Old 04-16-2011, 04:10 PM
 
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To avoid giving to much detail, I recently took this class over for the rest of the school year.

This whole school is a mess and I am the "new kid in town", so this may be beyond my place to say, but I do have tons of experience in both sped and gened. I have been in the majority of the schools in our district and have never seen anything like what goes on at this school.

Let's just say, next year things will be changing at this school for the better I hope.
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Old 04-16-2011, 05:13 PM
 
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Quote:
I know that it may not be the best idea to read a reading test to them, but I can't stant to see them struggle and get upset and think they can't do things. At this point, they can't read yet, plain and simple, but they will be able to one day,
I agree that one day the WILL be able to read and it totally isnt fair to be giving them a reading test at this point but..
Reading the questions to them on a reading test should not be done only because those results just are not valid in any way.
Poor kids.. first grade!
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Old 04-16-2011, 06:18 PM
 
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Right or wrong, I don't know, but I have 2 students who need support on our reading tests. I pull them to the side and read/assist as needed so that they get the experience. I use the information for guiding my instruction. Knowing how well they comprehend orally is an important tool. However, on the tests I mark that I assisted and their grades are done accordingly. Most of my reading grade comes from another assessment that we do, but I use these tests to communicate home with parents on what they can and cannot do.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:00 AM
 
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If it's in the kids IEP under accommodations that certain materials have to be read to them tough to those teachers. In the Goals and Objectives, you can place whatever reading goals you feel the students need. I have a suggestion for them. I'm trying to be professional.
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Old 04-21-2011, 06:01 PM
 
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I have questions:
DO these students have IEP's?
If yes why are they even taking these tests and not being tested at their ability level?
If no what is being done to help these children improve their reading? Is this school doing RTI?
How do you teach reading? What program are you using? Are these kids reading any words? Tell us more...
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Accomodations and modification
Old 05-01-2011, 06:26 PM
 
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Here is my thought......

If they have accomodations for modified curriculum then that is what you do. If this is on their IEP then it is what HAS to be done; it doesn't matter what the reg ed teachers want. No offense to reg ed teachers because they work hard too, but if it is in the IEP then that is what is followed.

If one of the areas says they are to be read to for a test (not to check their fluency) then that is what is to be done. If the parents were to find out and push then the school could be in a lot of trouble. The parents could run through the due process and create a lot of trouble for teachers and the school.

I don't mean to sound nasty about this, but it is true. This is a CYA moment.
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Reading Test Orally to students....
Old 06-07-2011, 11:22 AM
 
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I have been working with academically diverse students for 20+ years. If it is a math story problem or grammar test, I read all parts to the students. On the other hand, if it is a reading comprehension test, I allow the students to read them independently. Many high stake testing format require the comprehension test to be done at an independently level, so I practice the same technique in the class. I try to use short essays to practice the type of comprehension stories and literary question format prior to the test.

I try to maintain the intergrity of the reg. classroom teacher's test. Too much modifications that yield the student making a superior grade (A) on a test may make the teacher fills that the child does not need all that it being offered. He/she is using the mod. as crutch and not attempting. Talk with the teacher, carefully look at the student's needs, and reconvene and adjust mod. on IEP, if necessary.
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