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Do you feel resentful about SPED?
Old 08-09-2011, 05:51 PM
 
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I'm tired of being the teacher who can "handle" the difficult sped children. I did not go to college to become a special education teacher!!!!!! I never had any desire or interest to teach special education. Vent over.


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Old 08-09-2011, 06:00 PM
 
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I don't teach SPED, but I do get tired of getting the behavior kids or the ones who are too high for sped but too low to do anything on their own. I feel just look you that I get dumped on because they think I can deal with these. This has caused me to feel burned out from teaching even though I do love teaching.
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As the mother of a special needs daughter
Old 08-09-2011, 06:05 PM
 
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and a teacher, I have to say that she's had some wonderful teachers, and she's had some that did not want her in their classrooms. It takes a certain kind of person to work with special needs kids, and they are few and far between. I would have preferred that she not be mainstreamed into the regular ed classroom because many teachers didn't want her there, and in those cases, she did not do well. "Handling" special ed kids is not really the goal. That's what I have against inclusion. Special ed kids should be taught in an environment where they are wanted, and loved like the other kids in the class. I don't mean to put you down. I'm just frustrated with a system that makes kids go into classrooms where they are not wanted.
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Old 08-09-2011, 06:22 PM
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No I don't feel resentful about special educ.
Old 08-09-2011, 06:32 PM
 
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Quote:
I never had any desire or interest to teach special education.
Me neither. I had the desire to teach children!
Kids with special needs are still children and they deserve as much of an opportunity to learn from great teachers in welcoming classrooms as anyone else. I didn't know that anyone in education today was in a position where they didn't teach kids with special needs. It's just a part of what we do.
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deleted my message originally
Old 08-09-2011, 06:33 PM
 
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because this post was moved to the wrong board.


I realize the OP did not post this on the sped board, but it did get moved here....

I do have to say something to the signed out poster: You may not have gone to school to be a sped teacher, but if you work in public education, you MUST be prepared and able to teach ALL children, regardless of race, creed, disability, etc. etc. It is extremely offensive to read this type of rant from someone who went to school to be a teacher (well, unless this isn't a teacher, rather someone just trying to stir up trouble?).

Regardless, you aren't the only one who feels this way and it always disheartens me to hear this type of thing from a public educator. We can't choose our students and when we became teachers, we committed to doing our best with every student-not just the 'typical' ones.

I personally think all gen. ed. teachers should have some sped training-much more than the one or two classes that most colleges require.


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Thanks
Old 08-09-2011, 06:35 PM
 
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I couldn't have said it better, roo.
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Old 08-09-2011, 06:40 PM
 
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I remember in one of my special ed classes in college, one of the students actually said pretty much this same thing. "I'm not in college to teach those kids." The professor pretty much told her to change her major because she wouldn't be happy in any classroom.
I'm thankful for those teachers as see special ed kids as kids who deserve the best.
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I agree with that professor
Old 08-09-2011, 06:54 PM
 
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"It's not my job" is a phrase that sends me OVER the edge. There are a few teachers on my team that say this and it is all I can do not to go off. I get kids that have issues I haven't dealth with all of the time. I google, call colleagues and ask for help so I can serve whatever child finds his/her way to my classroom. I believe they call it "teaching."
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Old 08-09-2011, 07:39 PM
 
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This post breaks my heart! I read it and think about my second grader who was self-contained last year and will be mainstreamed next year for everything except Math and Language Arts. I sure hope she does not get a teacher like the OP.

Like someone else stated; I went to school to teach children.

I am hoping that since you get special education children, maybe you are great at working with them. Maybe your vent here is not in any way evident in your classroom or school. Maybe you just wish other teachers would also have some special education students so the load is balanced out.
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From the OP
Old 08-09-2011, 08:05 PM
 
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I know many of you are very upset with me because of my tirade/pity party. Let me clarify, I guess I was just venting about how I feel overwhelmed each year by the number of challenges I face in the classroom. I hope I would never make a child feel unwanted or unloved in my classroom. I guess it was a poorly worded vent saying "Help, I'm feeling overwhelmed, underappreciated, and nervous." I try to do my best and be helpful and compassionate, but also firm and effective.


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Old 08-09-2011, 08:19 PM
 
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I am a Special Ed teacher, and I think I understand what you mean, but please remember that these students are not choosing to be in room, or to act the way they act. I'm sure you are not, but please always remember not to take out your feelings on them. They already feel different or think of themselves as the "bad kid" or "stupid kid" and is very important that you do whatever you can do to change that perception. This will only be my 4th year teaching, and I have to say even though I went to college for Special Ed, I was not prepared! Just like every teaching job, I think you can really only learn by doing. So, please don't write yourself off yet, with practice, perseverance and the right attitude you can make a difference in those children's lives.
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maybe that is what you meant
Old 08-09-2011, 08:44 PM
 
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But it's not what you said:

Quote:
I did not go to college to become a special education teacher!!!!!! I never had any desire or interest to teach special education.

I'm sorry about your frustrations. We all have them. Please don't take them out on the students. You may think you don't, but this type of thought process and attitude often comes through-kids are sensitive.


P.S. to editors: I still think this thread has no business on the sped board--this board should be for special educators in SUPPORT of students with disabilities and surrounding subjects.

Last edited by newspedteach; 08-09-2011 at 10:52 PM..
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Why are you teaching special ed?
Old 08-10-2011, 06:39 AM
 
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I guess I'm a little confused. Why are you teaching special ed if you're not a special ed teacher? In my district only teachers with degrees in special ed teach special ed. Unless you're in an inclusion class, but then you still have a special ed co-teacher.
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:45 AM
 
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I agree this is a sad post but for many reasons....

it's sad because the college deals4 went to did not prepare her for the real world...Colleges need to change up their curriculum and incorporate special needs children classes into the regular ed curriculium. One class is not enough.

it's sad because deals4 feels inadequate to meet all student's need in a way that she feels will help them be successful... it's sad that her administration is not supporting her more

it's sad because she is not alone in her feelings but she feels alone at work

it's sad because the kids lose in a situation like this.

and finally it's sad because it is today's reality. We are mainstreaming special needs students more and more. LRE is alive and well and is not going to change any time soon. RTI is now reducing the numbers of children who qualify for special education support, and I believe that is a good/bad thing. We will see as time passes how this plays out. Many parents do not want their children to spend much time in a special education classroom for personal reasons and that is their right. Children with aspergers syndrome or autism are often in a regular ed classroom per parent request without aide support and have high needs. This is today's reality.

The question is how are we as special education teachers going to go out into our school population and support the gen ed teachers? I know many special ed teachers feel that is not their job...and possibly it isn't, but then whose job it is?
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Old 08-10-2011, 08:03 AM
 
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Well said, Roo.

Gah... can't even reply to this...
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Sped Resentment....
Old 08-10-2011, 08:50 AM
 
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I have a philosophy that I try hard to follow. It is to teach the kids I've got, and not the kids I wish I had, used to have, or remember as a kid. It really does help calm and focus me when I am feeling overwhelmed.

An observation that I have made about some general education teachers is that they either forget to or refuse to follow basic behavior plans that have been designed for the students who need them. For example, I've had several students who need their personal space in order to concentrate and keep hands to self. That means single a desk or spot away from table/desk groups. It also means thoughtful choices of which students to work with during group work. Yet, some g.e. teachers would insist on putting kids in table groups. Often part of the behavior plan is for the child to go to the pullout room to calm down. However, the g.e. teacher needs to let me know. I'll send an IA to pull the child. The last thing is that the g.e. teacher needs to tell me what is going on. That means spending a few minutes talking with me a week. I do and will support teacher who have inclusion kids in their rooms, but g.e. teachers also need to do their parts through communication and following behavior plans.

Last edited by blueheron; 08-10-2011 at 10:33 AM..
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I can relate...
Old 08-10-2011, 10:34 AM
 
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I love teaching children....however, there are some years that I have been giving the majority of "special" children whether they were identified as sped, just needed more of me, or were behavior issues. It is not a rant about kids, but the administration who created the class list. I had to remind myself that I must be what each student needed. Someone thought that I could handle my group of students better than the other teachers that year. It becomes frustrating when I have an overloaded room, and little support from sped or administration. I am not a sped teacher, nor do I have "extra" training, however I do work hard to create an enivironment that works for all students no matter their need. I have always believed that ALL students have an IEP, some just happen to be legally documented.
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Well, I believe ALL kids are SPECIAL
Old 08-10-2011, 02:04 PM
 
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and treat them that way.

All of the students in our school have some sort of special need in some way. Like a PP said, if you teach in a public school, you take what you get. Some of them are identified disabilities--some are unidentified disabilities, some are children of divorce, neglected, abused, spoiled, athletic, gifted, or have the "middle child syndrome" because they aren't special in any other way.

Whether they have physical needs, emotional needs or a verified disability, ALL are special and deserving of a quality education in WHATEVER classroom they happen to land in.

There are a lot of general ed teachers squealing and whining about getting "these" kids but, face it--More and more kids are identified every year. Autism and bipolar numbers are on the rise--all the classrooms have someone in SpEd. And Someone has to teach them ALL.

Apparently, someone believes you are capable of handling them. Trust yourself and do the best job you can.
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Old 08-10-2011, 03:10 PM
 
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Unfortunately it's a ticket to burnout in some places to admit you'll take on kiddos with challenges. If another teacher *isn't* so good, who gets the load? It's one of those "good deeds don't go unpunished" situations.
That's different from only wishing to teach "worthy" properly prepared students ... go into private tutoring for that
If you can't vent here, where can you vent?
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Wow
Old 08-10-2011, 04:02 PM
 
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I agree with several previous posts in regards to every teacher IS a SPECIAL EDUCATOR. Whether that was your major or not. Our public school systems are moving towards more inclusion every year. With the cuts and slashings of education budgets, I see this problem getting worse. Our self contained students will eventually get mainstreamed into gen ed classes. It would be cheaper to "man" every classroom with one or two para professionals than it would be to have one teacher and two to three paraprofessionals for six students. Think about it. I also see co-teaching being fazed out over time with these cuts. We live in a very scary time and we all need to be prepared for whomever walks or wheels thru our doors. We became educators to educate children of all shapes, sizes, colors, abilities and ethnicities. We need to support each other and help those that are less fortunate when it comes to the patience factor.
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I was that kid....
Old 08-11-2011, 03:11 AM
 
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I have tears in my eyes because I was that kid. I have a visual impairment and learning disability and by the grace of God I became a teacher of special needs. I was the inclusion teacher for one year and I worked with a teacher who had the low ability and speical needs students and she dId not want them in there. It angers me to hear people saying they don't like special needs kids. No kid wants to deal with a disability and no kid (speaking from experience wants to be different). In this day and age having the special needs kids in your room is expected. I am not a big fan of inclusion, but having the attitude of I don't want to be bothered makes me mad, sad and plain down DISGUSTED!!!!!
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Old 08-11-2011, 03:13 AM
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Old 08-11-2011, 08:20 AM
 
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Maybe the OP meant behavior problems when she/he said "difficult." If so, I can relate to that. It's not fair for one teacher that is not SPED qualified to get all of the behavior SPED students in one class! It's just TOO much and is not fair to all the other students.

I had a class with 2 SPED students that were not labeled LD but were in SPED because of extreme behavior. Let's just say my year was tough. I followed EVERY plan or behavior contract that was put in place by our SPED teacher but still it was difficult and took EVERY bit of energy that I had to remain vigilant for my other students as well.

They were only with the SPED teacher for one hour a day for one area that they were considered low in (qualified for). The rest of the time it was on me... maybe this is what the OP is referring to. I have had several SPED kids over the years for various other reasons... LD, DD, OHI and while it is also a lot of work it is VERY different than having a child that is in SPED for behavior. They were a joy and made great progress and were treated just like everyone else but got a little more of my attention to help them grow. The behavior students got my extra attention too but not always to help them learn it was to get them to control themselves so everyone else could learn.

It's a difficult situation for a general ed. teacher with minimal SPED training to have to deal with behaviors that are so extreme and unpredictable.
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Misinterpretation
Old 08-11-2011, 09:56 AM
 
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From MY understanding of what the original poster wrote, she's not putting down Spec Ed kids, she's saying that she's burnt out because she get all of the hard to handle kids year after year.
I understand that.
You can't give the hard to handle kids to the same teacher year after year, this will indeed burn them out. So Mrs. Nice gets the "easier" kids because she can't handle the difficult ones and Mrs. UptotheChallenge gets the "difficult" ones because she can? How is that fair? If Mrs. UptotheChallenge has the more challenging class year after year, soon she's just gonna be tired...

I only read the first few posts and then skipped the rest, so if someone else already wrote something similar, sorry.

Tulips

ETA: I just reread my post and I hope it doesn't sound too harsh, I really didn't mean it to be. I just felt like many people had missed the point of her post...

Last edited by Tulips; 08-11-2011 at 11:00 AM..
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TOO harsh!!!
Old 08-11-2011, 12:31 PM
 
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I thought all day during a common core meltdown about what I said and I apologize. Having the sepcial ed kids within your classroom at times can be very trying for a gen. ed teacher. There are MANY reasons for this so if what I said was awful (which it was I apologize.).
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Old 08-11-2011, 02:32 PM
 
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I have become firmly against inclusion at his point. It may be just my district, but the students with special needs are placed in the regular ed classroom and proper support is NOT given. They do NOT all have a co-teacher/sped teacher in the room. Some do not even have full time support in the form of a para. Many of the Sped kids are not in the appropriate environment as indicated by the many, many meltdowns that happen each day. It is not good for the regular ed kids when all learning comes to a complete stop multiple times a day while the teacher (not sped trained) stops to redirect or contain a student who is unable to attend even in the least little bit. It is wrong to place every sped kid no matter what their need in a regular ed classroom. I feel bad for sped and reg ed kids in the situations that have been created.

I know there are districts out there who do a great job with inclusion, but I have not witnessed it. The inclusion rooms become a dumping ground. They are really not inclusion classrooms, but special ed rooms with regular ed kids in the room and no educator trained to meet the needs of the special ed children. The Sped teacher splits her time between all the inclusion rooms. The one on our grade level services 14 children in 3 different classrooms.

This has become an upsetting issue for me as I watch children and teachers try to cope with this awful creation.
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Inclusion is poorly done
Old 08-11-2011, 03:09 PM
 
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Until lawmakers funnel proper money into inclusion it will be poorly done. I am NOT in favor of it. It angers me at times because the gen. ed teachers seem to think they teach much better than I do. They mke comments such as: "I worry sometimes that she is missing so much by being in your room." Inclusion is a no win situation right now either it's wrong or right.
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I have been reading with interest....
Old 08-12-2011, 09:02 AM
 
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the general ed and special ed teacher posts. I think both sides have very valid points! In am in FL where the self-contained special education classrooms are dwindling away. I ask myself why and the only answer I can come up with is MONEY...It is expensive to pay a teacher with a classroom of 12 children....I have taught special kids for 32 years and have seen this "ball go around" more times than I want to admit. I do not agree with the "magic number" of <69 IQ needed to be a self-contained special ed child. These are children NOT a number. I also do not agree with placing a child with an IQ of 72 into general ed classrooms where he/she will be "playing school" for "socialization" because the general ed teacher does not have adequate help for this child.. We all must remember that, with the stringent requirements to make AYP, that all teachers face, a child with a low IQ in those classroom with cause scores to go down. I am, somewhat, insulted when the "powers to be" feel that I am no longer needed to teach a special curriculum. I have invested my whole teaching career in helping educate the mentally disabled child. To think that a general ed teacher, with 30 kids, can meet their needs is ridiculous! With that said, general ed teacher must realize that we (spec ed teachers) do not make these rulings, but we must abide by them. So...if you have a special needs child in your room you must, by law, educate them along with the 30+ children you have.
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Old 08-12-2011, 06:56 PM
 
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WELL SAID. I see both sides. I am a self contained special ed teacher AND a Mom of a son with Asperger's. He doesn't qualify for self contained classes, but does struggle to keep up with the gen ed curriculum. He is in co-taught classes which I don't always feel is done the way it should be. My son does have behavioral issues. Trust me! He is in no way wanting to act out in class. He doesn't want to stand out, but he is wired so differently and can't help himself. The special needs students within your gen ed classes did not ask to come into this world the way God gave them to us. No parent prays for their child to have special needs. We take what God has blessed us with and make the best of it. I struggle at home with my son. His behaviors get in the way of a "normal" family life. We can't go out of the house past a certain time (6pm as he is in bed by 7), we can't go over bridges, we can't vary too much from our routine. BUT we CAN and DO love him, provide for him not matter his needs, and show (TEACH) him how to adjust to a world which is not ready to adjust to him. As educators we are the ones who need to pave a path for these children to be successful somewhere in their lives. Whether it is in a gen ed classroom or a special ed classroom. It is our responsibility as educators and humans to open our arms, broaden our minds and move forward not backwards in education.
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A little overwhelmed
Old 08-13-2011, 04:51 PM
 
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I understand overwhelming feeling the original poster must be having. I, too, am overwhelmed to have all these changes taking place in our school district. I teach kindergarten with an endorsement in English Language Learners and up until this year it was self-contained (only in kinder), but now they have integrated us with gen. ed. and begun spec. ed. inclusion for kindergarten all in the same year....oh, and gave us new standards to work with. I like to give the benefit of the doubt, and so I think that many teachers who now have spec. ed. inclusion are simply overwhelmed and feel unprepared. Personally, I am terrified that I won't be able to meet the needs of all of my students because I am not trained to teach children with special needs. Our district apparently knew they were going to make this change 5 years ago, told parents about it, but never told the teachers. Then, to make up for their error they provided a week of paid professional development courses during the summer to "equip us with all that we need to know". It's a joke and it is very discouraging.

I do believe that ALL children deserve to have access to a good education, but I believe that a special education teacher CAN provide that if given the curriculum and materials that they need. If this is not an option, then ALL teachers need to be trained during the certification process to teach special education. As an ELL teacher I already modify and differentiate my instruction, and from what I can tell that is mostly what needs to be done. But, when given a student with moderate autism who does not have a one-on-one assistant and who is self-injurious and screaming at various times throughout the day for reasons I am unable to discern, how am I supposed to teach the standards to my other students that need to be met by EVERY student and that I am accountable for?

I just don't see how it is possible to not infringe upon someone's rights when the school districts don't have the funding to have the appropriate staff in the schools.
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I totally agree KEL teacher!
Old 08-13-2011, 07:16 PM
 
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This "new way" is not working for special needs kids, especially those with moderate mental handicaps. It is a "no win" for both sides. I have great empathy for the general education teachers out there who will be faced with an increasing number of special needs kids in their classroom. I do not know how you all will be able to do it.... I especially feel sorry for those of you that are on a "pay for performance" evaluation scale. The next few years are going to be h*** for you...that is until the "ball starts rolling back the other way". By then, many teachers will have left the profession and many special kids will have been left behind...No Child Left Behind? what a joke
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Burnout for both ends...
Old 08-14-2011, 10:03 AM
 
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Part of the burnout problem is the firm and solid knowledge that even with your best efforts, you're not doing the sped kid justice.
I taught at a private school for kids with learning disabilities, and oh, my, the way these kiddos could flourish and flower when given what they needed! I *knew* these were the kiddos that we juggled our time to *try* to give them what they needed, but fact is that a bright or average LD kiddo or a kid with behavior issues is not going to really have access to the learning they're capable of.
The teacher who sees that the effort of handling the difficult kiddos takes away from all the resources *without* even meeting those kids' needs... welp, I for one found myself recommending homeschooling...
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hmmm!!!
Old 08-14-2011, 10:36 AM
 
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I have often thought that I am often spinning my wheels with my special ed kids because the unofficial limit for my room is 12 with NO paraprofessional. I usually end the year at 16 with NO aide by March and I wonder how in the world am I suppose to help these kids. I get so frustrated when other teachers say well you only have 4 or 5 kids well my one kid is 3 of yours. Not to mention that parents often don't want to assist you in any way because they ar in denial. Also no one has high expectations for the sepcial needs kids.
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Old 08-14-2011, 11:11 AM
 
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I hear the frustration in the OP. I am an inclusion teacher. I have been officially teaching inclusion for about 12 years now. But I have always had children with needs in my 22 years of teaching (and I agree with the poster that said that all children have needs. It's my job as an educator to find the strengths in all my students and build upon those areas to help build areas that need help.

As I said, I do hear the OP frustration. For me, personally, it is not the concept of having children with IEPs that makes classes challenging but rather the dynamics of the class. Administrators have a responsiblity to the students in their schools as well as their staff to create classes that enhance success for all students.

Overloading a class is not condusive to any student or any teacher. When you have classes that are overloaded with students, no one wins. It is very frustrating. The neediest children occupy a tremendous amount of your time (IEPs or not) which leaves little time to help those average or low average kiddos that need you or time to enrich those students who require more.

I've had that year where I had 17 children and 8 of them were classified with significant learning and behavioral issues and then an additional 3 or 4 with learning and/or behavioral issues and were placed in inclusion for the extra support (again another administration decision that should not occur). This was a very frustrating year. It made me question whether I wanted to stay in teaching.

Each year, I am given the very backward (and I find, insulting) compliment that I am given the "neediest" because "I can handle it".

My husband tells me each year to "volunteer" NOT to do inclusion. He sees my frustration and all the extra work I put in to move these students. But I love what I do. I am a regular ed teacher who happens to have a spec ed degree. I can read all the testing and actually understand it. I am an advocate for my students (IEPs or not). A very loud advocate. As my hubby says, I can talk the talk and walk the walk. No one can "flub" me because I know what it means and the interventions and LAWS.

I have worked hard to make sure my students have what they need and are required to have. I have been known to go to administration (and higher ups) and notify them that they are not in compliance. It has really put administrators on their toes (in my building and in the district) because they know that if they are not doing right by my kids, they'll have to deal with me.

As frustrating as some years have been, I can't imagine teaching anything else. I really believe inclusion is what I was put on this Earth to do. And whether I do "inclusion" or not, there will always be children who have needs of one kind or another.

Being a mommy of 2 classified children (ADHD and LD), it can be a bit frustrating dealing with their teachers. Neither of my children have had many teachers who have had experience in spec ed. the one year my DD did was wonderful. It was the one year I felt I didn't have to fight for anything because she knew what to do.

I find myself having to do alot of follow up. This isn't the teachers' faults. Most reg ed teachers don't have the kind of experience or training to "handle" some situations. Luckily my DD's spec ed teacher is on the ball and truly collaborates with her teacher. Unfortunately, my DS does not have a spec ed teacher. His needs are not academic but attentional (he's adhd) and in many cases, social. His teacher this year, who BTW I really liked, really didnt' know how to deal with DS. He needed a lot of guidance and support. I was the one who had to get that support for him (officially on DS's IEP). It wasn't just given to him because he asked for it.

So....I guess what I'm saying in this very longwinded post (sorry) is that I understand both sides - as a teacher of inclusion and as a parent of 2 designated children who require the help. It can be a very frustrating situation if the teacher and the students are not given the help they require
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regular ed teacher who HAPPENS to have a spec
Old 08-14-2011, 12:29 PM
 
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I also believe that we should look for the strengths in all children and I know this will be my last post on this page, because it is making me very angry. I am not a regular ed teacher who happens to teach special ed. I am dually certified but I wanted to teach students with special needs. I taught inclusion and it wasn't for me and bravo to anyone who can do inclusion, it's not for me. What I resent is that misconception that special need teachers are not as qualified as the gen. ed teachers or we don't have high standards for our student. I also feel the level of inclusion has to fit the individual student and not the same level fit everyone. I think what the original poster is what so many reg. ed teachers feel is fustration because of the pressure that is being put upon them. In my district the special needs students are expected to make gains as well so I also feel that pressure. At this point I agree to disagree
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Old 08-17-2011, 08:59 AM
 
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You could not have said it any better. I agree with you 100%!!!


I was not going to say anymore on this subject either, partly from frustration over the fact that the editors left this post on this board, even though I asked for the VENT about sped to be moved.

Here is the descriptor for this board:

Quote:
This board is exclusively for teachers of students with special needs. Please join us!





Oh well. Life goes on.

Last edited by newspedteach; 08-17-2011 at 09:40 AM..
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I get it
Old 08-17-2011, 09:10 AM
 
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I look at the special Ed student as a challenge when they are mainstreamed into my class how can I encourage and motivate them. I love it when the Spec Ed teacher tells me that "so and so" loves your class Makes me want to try even harder just the compliment and smiles from that student makes my day. And I am the only regular teacher that student has
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Old 08-19-2011, 06:45 PM
 
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I didn't want to become a sped teacher either, but now that I'm doing it, the only thing I really dislike is the paperwork....ieps, tracking reports, progress reports, meetings, etc. I love the kids though.
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Agreed
Old 08-23-2011, 04:56 PM
 
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I agree. I teach children with severe/profound needs. I do a disability awareness training every year with all of the classes that have my students (wish I could do it school/district wide, but I am only 1 person and who will watch my students?). Sometimes it is the teachers and parents that are more amazed with what our kids are truly capable of. I am also amazed at the staff that really don't want anything to do with these kids. Their attitudes come through loud and clear, even though sometimes they don't think they do. These kids didn't choose to be born with disabilities or to be placed in the situations they are any more than we chose if we would be born with blond or brown hair. Have compassion and be thankful that you are healthy and/or your children are healthy. Put yourself in a parents shoes, just one day. I hear enough complaining from staff about the special ed. kids, I sure don't want to hear it here. There isn't anybody else in my district that teaches what I teach at this level. I come here to get ideas and inspiration from my peers, to support my peers, and get the occasional laugh! It is disappointing to hear yet one more person complain about the special education population. Thumbs up to all of you who continue to work with this population every day.
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Just my 2 cents worth
Old 09-02-2011, 05:23 PM
 
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I am a regular ed teacher with inclusion kids this year with very little (45 minutes daily) spec. ed support. My spec ed kids can't read and are very disruptive! They have been used to being pulled out and read to most of the time, and are now expected to get it in the classroom somehow. They choose to run around and disrupt instead. They realize the work is impossible with a first grade reading level in 4th grade, they have no interest in grades or intrinsic motivation to work, so why not have a party all day! We are under enormous pressure to make our general ed kids proficient with constant testing and teacher evaluations, and the pressure is making me retink this career choice. I realize these kids have special needs, and I know they need to learn to read, but I'm beyond teaching letter sounds. My curriculum standards are impossibly high for the other kids who deserve an education, too. My son is reading 5 grade levels above his class, and he gets none of the attention these kids are getting. Teachers spend such a huge portion of their day working with special needs kids that many high kids are left suffering for the time spent with behavior issues or reading to nonreaders all day. I hate to be grumpy, but I didn't send him to school to tutor other kids all day, and if I made more money, I'd send him to a private school because of this. I am only one person. There is a special ed classroom. I just don't understand why the regular ed classroom is now both.
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I promised myself I wouldn't post again but..
Old 09-05-2011, 03:57 PM
 
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The regular ed. classroom is now both spec ed. room and regular ed room because lawmakers are taking all of the money that should go to education and funding silly projects. Also I teach special ed and I DO NOT READ to my kids all day and I resent the implication that I do. I am very sorry that your son who sounds very smart is not receiving the education he deserves, but neither are the special needs kids.
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I completely agree!
Old 09-06-2011, 04:41 PM
 
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Teaching spec. ed kids is not the job of peers. All of my kids' IEP's say "peer tutoring" as a modification for them, but no one is teaching my spec. ed kids to read! They have no idea how blends or letters fit together to make words. It is ridiculous to think that them being "included" in 4th grade reading lessons on main idea and choosing character traits based on the text is beneficial when they can't read ANY of the text! I just don't understand it at all. In the scope of life, main idea falls pretty low on the scale in comparison to the ability to read. When could I possibly find the time to teach letter sounds in a day? Sure, include these kids in related arts or science and social studies, but really during reading time, someone needs to pull these kids and teach them to read. It is a matter of life survival. Comparing and contrasting texts really isn't. That is why I wonder how inclusion could possibly benefit anyone. It doesn't benefit my spec. ed kids, and it certainly does not benefit my regular ed kids at all. It seems we all suffer.
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