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School Wide PBIS
Old 05-31-2016, 07:02 PM
 
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Hello everyone,


So I'm interested in pitching to my administration a "Gotcha!" school wide PBIS program in a couple of week for the upcoming school year and was wondering if anyone had some experience with this before. I've done some research on the PBIS.org website and Google of course however, I know how invaluable first hand experience can be.

Does anybody have any information they could share?

I'll take any information anybody is willing to share!

Thanks ahead of time!


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well...
Old 06-01-2016, 09:41 AM
 
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To the best of my knowledge this is what our school has been doing the last two years in PBIS. I will not tell, though, if it has been successful. I mean, to some degree it was.

The philosophy behind it is that everybody in the school supports and rewards positive behavior. To guide this work my first implemented the ticket system. The students would get a ticket for whatever is expected of them: follow directions, participate in discussions, quiet in line, on the rug etc. The point of this also to avoid bad behaviors at all costs. Once students or as a class have got enough tickets, they can redeem them for a prize (prices are agreed upon by the entire school: trips, no homework, extra gym time, computer time etc). However, this year we are using class dojo. It is way easier and more efficient way for students earn rewards like dojo points. Once the students/class have earned enough (set a limit), students can redeem points for a prize.

Also, once a week we have a PBIS assembly at which point students with the most points/well behaved receive a certificate of appreciation. This whole thing happens in front of all the students and teachers to recognize the best of the best. I hope it helps.
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My DD's school...
Old 06-01-2016, 11:03 AM
 
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Her school did something similar except your tickets where put into a *raffle* for Wii time during lunch, and that sort of things.

What happen was all the "problem" kids got tickets. I don't know how much the deal was rigged, but parents of the "good" kids started griping.

It got dropped when the other kids had checked out, and the kids with "less issues" started not turning their tickets into the raffle. For one, it was no glory standing up there with the class problem child, and when problem child didn't get his/her named pulled...sore loser was the understatement.
Many an assembly ended with kids crying, screaming and a couple times shoves.

My DD didn't want a ticket. She thought only the bad kids got them for encouragement. I told her that wasn't true, but it was hard arguing that point when all her friends felt the same way.

In that school, prizes meant very little, as the kids have a lot at home. When you start rewarding behavior that the child should be doing anyway, the kids saw right through that by 3rd grade.

The school had maybe 1 or 2 really hard to handle kids in each class. Most of that was ADHD related stuff or home was a hot mess and it spilled into the classroom. The rest of the class was more or less fine. That's about 14 kids for a school of 400. 5% had issues enough to be frequent fliers to the office.

My DD's last year there, the new principal pulled it. She thought it was insulting because it wound up focusing on the kids with the behavioral issues, didn't add much for the kids who behaved.

This is a school where the whole school isn't a dumpster fire. The kids were not impressed by school swag or computer time. (had better computers at home). The kindies to most of 2nd grade sort of bought into the program. 3rd through 5th didn't care at all.


Make it random. Make sure the rewards mean something. Everyone needs to be invested or the whole thing starts falling apart really fast.
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Pbis
Old 06-01-2016, 01:45 PM
 
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My take on PBIS: more work is placed on teachers, kids get so many chances before they have a meaningful consequence, major problems are not dealt with. Office is happy because it is less paperwork for them.
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Grade level?
Old 06-03-2016, 05:23 PM
 
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PBIS is just another way to reward the "bad" kids and punish everybody else. Our middle school used to have rewards days once a quarter (at each grade level) for students who met individual behavior expectations. Students who didn't make it stayed back at school. Many caught up on homework. Sometimes the head custodian would take some to do campus clean up (which they loved) or other teachers would take them so they could get caught up on work. NOW, classwide behavior incentives count. And the percentages have dropped. It used to be 85% of students had to meet behavior standards so the class could have their reward day. This year, at least in 6th grade (where I subbed frequently), only 82% had to meet. I know that our 7th graders didn't make their incentive a couple of times. We just rescheduled and started over. So then, the good kids began misbehaving, because we didn't make it anyway. The bad kids didn't care if they got a reward or not. There have been some good things about PBIS, such as Check In/Check Out for students who need just that little extra organization and adult positive interaction at the beginning and end of each day. The academic part of the program is great. I despise the rest of it. I mean, with each and every ounce of my being, I hate that we reward the bad kids and punish the good ones. And, as doolnut stated, it is extra work for the teachers.


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Old 06-04-2016, 05:28 AM
 
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Thank you everyone, I appreciate all of your responses! From what I've looked into so far, I don't know if my school would have the problems you describe such as bad kids being rewarded and good kids misbehaving as a result however, please let me explain what I have so far and let me know if that's how your schools started out. And yes, the plan that I have found relies on increased teacher involvement and I know that will be a hurdle to pass before (if) we implement it.


The idea behind "Gotcha" is that anyone in the building can reward a student for positive behavior that the school has highlighted; i.e. walking quietly in the halls or consoling a friend who is crying. Teachers, custodians, bus drivers, main office, anyone who works in the building can give that student a "Gotcha Buck" and they get a certificate on the "Gotcha" wall. At the end of the month students can trade in their "Gotcha Bucks" for a variety of prizes (I've attached a "menu" that a school uses). I was going to talk to local restaurants, arcades, children's museums to see if they would offer some kind of deal or something free for students who get a lot of "Gotcha Bucks" for that month.

Is that similar to the kinds of PBIS programs your schools had?
Attached Files
File Type: doc Gotcha Menu.doc (160.0 KB, 63 views)
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Old 06-05-2016, 12:46 PM
 
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Yes, we have that too! That is just one part of PBIS.
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Rewarding "Bad" Kids
Old 06-06-2016, 03:11 PM
 
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What Mrsd5 said is exactly what I saw. The disruptive students were rewarded and the great students were insulted and ignored.

We started our PBIS after the start of the year. We have the assembly and everything is a bit vague. Our prince tells us to try to give the disruptive kids the tickets to help motivate them. Some teachers do try to recognize some improvements in our most troubled students. The bad kids were getting huge amounts of tickets and winning "all the good stuff." The good kids went home and complained that only the troublemakers were getting rewarded. So then the prince yells at teachers for ignoring the "good" kids. People still complained. So then, we were told to make sure we weren't leaving any kids out. It became embarrassing. Kids were even like, "Why am I getting a ticket? I'm not doing anything."

Some teachers gave away all of their tickets while others just threw them in the garbage. We did all types of character education and all that. Kids were mad that class time was wasted on this. By the end of the year, it seemed like everyone was ticked! We did have kids (7th and 8th graders!) CRY when they didn't get a ticket. Then, kids started stealing them and giving them to other kids. The good kids actually would say, "I want nothing to do with this program. I don't want a ticket." Then, we had to write the kid's name on the ticket and write down what they do for the ticket. (More work for teacher.) I was pretty good at giving out the tickets, but I gave out most of mine in the lunch room and in the hallways. "Thank you for walking!"

Just like basically everything my school does, it became a mess. I have a feeling that we will not be doing this fiasco again next year. I also need to mention that we didn't do a lot of the program, so I feel like you could have a much better experience at your school! (I hope!)
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To Kpossibble518
Old 06-06-2016, 03:26 PM
 
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No, the ideas in the attachment were nothing like what we did.

First of all, I doubt that any of us would give up a lunch to eat with a student. Our schedules are packed and we use lunch to use the restroom and eat. Plus, our union would not approve of us volunteering our time. Even asking teachers to do this would cause a lot of issues. We've been at a pay freeze for a long time and things are bad across the board here.

Second of all, we did a lot of concrete prizes like raffles for a Kindle, free school lunch, pencils, games, toys, and school gear. Many kids fought over this stuff and some of it just got destroyed.

Third, we had some school time events like a dance, basketball game, free gym time, go outside and eat ice cream, and watch a movie. This caused issues because students were supposed to check in with their teacher before going. The dance took of three periods so students who had late work ended up going. Teachers were mad. Also, the kids didn't like the movie shown and some left and roamed around the school.

Fourth, admin. would go to random classes and give out doughnuts for a ticket. Teachers were mad because this was disruptive and students who didn't get ones were mad. A lot of kids had lost their tickets or left them at home and never got to use them.

Sorry, I guess this is more a list of what not to do. The biggest success was probably free gym time.
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Old 06-06-2016, 04:34 PM
 
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Dear Mshope,


I hear you, I am on this forum because I am afraid of it falling apart quite easily. Some background on my school/situation:

I work at a private Yeshiva where the English studies teachers start at 12:00 and work until 4:30. We are a PreK-6th grade school. My hope as far as lunch goes, is that all that would be required of English studies teachers would be to make sure they get to work by 11:30 (which let's be honest, is an awesome time to have to come to work and most of us do anyway).

There are two issues that I am most worried about:
  • Few of my co-workers are willing to go above and beyond because we don't get paid well, in fact we get paid well below state mandated (for public school) salary. We don't feel appreciate by our environment and I think that our students feel that as well.
  • The fluidity of behavior expectations between the Hebrew studies teachers and English studies teachers varies greatly. I would love if the PBIS program would make us more unified.

I am hoping that by implementing this program, my co-workers will see a change in behavior and will be more willing to assist in the positive behavior. Also, I was thinking that the tickets that we give out would from the get go be filled out with a students name and what they did to earn a ticket. My issue with that is how to keep track of it.

A list of what not to do is just as helpful as positive outcomes. My hopes in starting this topic is to find out what I should and should not do based on peoples' experiences.


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Old 06-06-2016, 07:34 PM
 
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Quote:
...I am hoping that by implementing this program, my co-workers will see a change in behavior and will be more willing to assist in the positive behavior. ...
Change in education is difficult. Any time one suggests (or mandates) a new program no matter its merits some will run with it, some will dig in their heels and the rest will sit on the fence.

If you want real penetration involving the most enthusiastic the program should be voluntary. If you try to force you often get bad mouthing, apathy and attempts to sabotage. To pull the hardcores into the program consider leading by example. Even the most burned-out teacher will notice how well behaved the classes involved in the program are and how little effort the teachers are putting forth to achieve it.
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Old 06-07-2016, 05:12 PM
 
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We've used it in our building for a few years. Our emphasis is on positive behavior no matter who is displaying it (haven't heard about rewarding the problem kids more). We do the monthly rewards, used to do the school store to turn tickets in for stuff. The only way we could afford the goodies was via a grant. When the grant stopped, P said it had to be a self funded program so we had fundraisers and sales to fund the stuff. Some staff like it, some don't, we all don't quite use it as its meant to be used though. My issues with it are I have a really hard time, physically rewarding those that are doing what they are supposed to be doing. Verbal rewards-great, but I don't have time to keep passing out tickets. Also, the students who so often are in the orange and red zone, should ideally be met with to come up with ways for them to straighten out their behavior. Well, we don't have enough Social Workers for that-so that never happened.

We are now in the process of looking at other programs.
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Old 06-07-2016, 06:06 PM
 
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I am not a fan of PBIS, due to it seems like mental control. Too me, I feel like PBIS is Orwellan.
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:39 PM
 
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Kids w/ behavioral problems tended to win everything at our school too. WE had the same problem as a PP. The behavior problems seemed to get all of the rewards making it meaningless to the well- behaved kids. The well-behaved kids did not need tickets to do what was right. We need to have these kids learn intrinsic value. I'd find tickets all over the floor. They could have been given when unexpected ( above and beyond) behaviors happened to kids. ( as opposed to for doing what was expected and known) What might have fixed our PBIS prob would have been to give teachers an amount of tickets that was representative to how many kids they had. ( Instead of endless rolls of tickets) Our really disturbed kids got tons of them because many were in sped. They would get them for every tiny thing they did correctly. A lot of those kids needed tangible reinforcement. It did not turn into a school wide Happy Fest for us...either. It put a lot of more work on teachers too. I actually would guess the program was not implemented correctly at our school.
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Update on PBIS in my School
Old 09-22-2016, 03:08 AM
 
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Hi everyone,

Thanks for all of the replies! So after hearing your input I decided to not even bother with putting together all of the moving pieces for a PBIS program except for mentioning it to my principal. About 3 weeks before school started this year we got our regular welcome back e-mail and included was a program my principal put together! I'm so excited that she took it under consideration and we are trying it out!

So far it's working out well, but it has only been about 2 weeks. The bus drivers are having a meeting with a school staff member to be informed and given the "fireflies" (we have a camping theme so the kids are earning fireflies) and the gym, art, and computers teachers have been giving them out. My 4th graders are very excited about this and so am I! The winning class(es) will get some kind of party (Chinese food, pizza, etc.).

If there is any advice now that my school has decided to implement this program that anyone has, I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks again!

- Kimm
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Old 09-25-2017, 09:28 PM
 
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PBIS stand for Poor Behavior It Sucks. We have been doing it for awhile now. The administration thinks its works. They look at the number of referrals that have decreased and thinks it works. The teachers have so many hoops to jump through. Fill this sheet out, google doc this, document that. Then, the kid gets a warning. A freakin warning. So, we don't even write them up due to this. That is why referrals are down.
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