Special Ed Certification Test - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Special Ed Certification Test

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
dhteach dhteach is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member

dhteach
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member
Special Ed Certification Test
Old 07-24-2009, 06:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hi, I'm wondering if anyone has taken the special ed certification test in Texas (#161)? I was told it would make me more "marketable" if I had that and the ESL test. I graduated in May and do not have a job as of yet. I really need some help with studying for the test. I bought a study guide (Xamonline) but it doesn't seem to have enough information. I found several study guides that can be downloaded but I'm not sure how good they are and they're expensive! Any tips, study guides, or info you have will be appreciated Thanks!


dhteach is offline   Reply With Quote

whatever's Avatar
whatever whatever is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,241
Senior Member

whatever
 
whatever's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,241
Senior Member
I'm not in TX so take it for what it is
Old 07-24-2009, 07:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

worth here BUT I would not take the test unless you are willing and able to teach it as well. Our contracts here state that the district can place us in any position for which we are qualified.

I have heard many, many stories from SpEd teachers who say they NEVER wanted SpEd classes (just the additional knowledge and certification). They were placed there when the school got desperate or took it thinking it would be a way to get their foot in the door.
whatever is offline   Reply With Quote
mreinelt's Avatar
mreinelt mreinelt is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 146
Full Member

mreinelt
 
mreinelt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 146
Full Member
TX EXIT Test
Old 07-24-2009, 08:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I am in TX and a Sp Ed teacher....Took the test many moons ago...It was easy for me because I was trained and had worked in Special ed...For others trained in TX I hear it is hard and many don't pass on the first time....Personally, if you really want to teach special ed go to your local region education center and take their course for the exit test... However, presently everyone is looking for Math teachers at every level...Good luck. August is the time when everyone is scrambling for new teachers...Good luck
mreinelt is offline   Reply With Quote
Laura's Avatar
Laura Laura is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,994
Senior Member

Laura
 
Laura's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,994
Senior Member
We need classes AND test
Old 07-25-2009, 09:16 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I took certification classes and the Praxis test for both SpEd and ESL. I thought ESL was much harder than the SpEd test. I am teaching both next year though I have had SpEd for over 10 years and ESL for 2!
Laura is offline   Reply With Quote
dhteach dhteach is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member

dhteach
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member
Thanks for the advice and help!
Old 07-25-2009, 08:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I've heard about teachers getting stuck in a classroom because of having a certain certification. I've been a paraprofessional in sped for several years and am interested in it. I just don't know that I want to do it forever......I really don't know exactly what grade level or area I prefer as of yet. I know I like the younger kiddos though Thanks again!


dhteach is offline   Reply With Quote
mrssford mrssford is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
New Member

mrssford
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
New Member
Sped
Old 07-26-2009, 09:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I agree with previous posters that you really have to have heart and desire to teach children with special needs. Don't do it if you really have no desire to teach in this area. With that said, the practice tests on the state website are the best study materials in my opinion. There is a lot of the same info that is on the EC-4 Generalist exam also, so I would look over that one as well (especially the reading section). Read and review the ARD and IEP process. I passed it my first time, but I have been working with children with special needs for the past three years and already knew a lot about ARD and IEP stuff.
mrssford is offline   Reply With Quote
cl2485 cl2485 is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member

cl2485
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member
I'm a SPED teacher in TX
Old 07-26-2009, 10:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

If you really want to teach in SPED, then yes, it would be great for you to have the certification. A lot of schools are looking for Math and Science, though, so if you are interested in those fields, you would definitely be more in demand. I got my degree in SPED, so it really wasn't a big deal to take the certification exam. I am a believer that if you practice in the format of the test, then you will be more prepared for it. You can go to the SBEC website and they have a practice test online that you can get for free and the correct answers are on the last page. It also gives you the competencies and helpful tips in the beginning. With the answers, I think it also tells you what competency it is from (so that you can brush up on it if you are missing a lot of questions from the same one), but I'm not 100% sure about that. The SBEC website is a very good resource for any exam you want to take. They have at least one practice exam for EVERY certification test you can take.
cl2485 is offline   Reply With Quote
kbach kbach is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member

kbach
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member
Test
Old 07-27-2009, 07:10 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I am in Florida and just downloaded a study guide from the testing website. It was all I needed. I didn't spend much time studying and I didn't think the ESE test was difficult at all.
kbach is offline   Reply With Quote
Tounces's Avatar
Tounces Tounces is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,677
Senior Member

Tounces
 
Tounces's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,677
Senior Member
test
Old 07-27-2009, 07:21 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Do you mean that you can get the special ed certificate just by taking the test and no classes? If you have had the classes, the test is just a review of what was already taught.
Tounces is offline   Reply With Quote
TexasTechgirl TexasTechgirl is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 15
New Member

TexasTechgirl
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 15
New Member

Old 07-27-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I took it back in August and I thought it was kind of common sense. It will make you more marketable but you really need some classes in order to REALLY know how to teach these kiddos.The book itself is not enough. I graduate in May as well from Texas Tech and it's really hard to find a job right now. Keep looking because a lot of districts are just now getting teachers resignations. They have until the end of July. email me at halberts@friscoisd.org and I'll give you some more info on stuff. Good luck!


TexasTechgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
kbach kbach is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member

kbach
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member
test only
Old 07-27-2009, 10:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

In Florida you can get ESE added to your certificate without any classes. You just take the test. However, I agree, you need a LOT more than the test to do it well.
kbach is offline   Reply With Quote
dhteach dhteach is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member

dhteach
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 58
Junior Member
Thanks
Old 07-28-2009, 08:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I have found several jobs I'm interested in but they all require special education certification. I'm not sure why...... One of the positions was a resource reading lab for intermediate age children and another was working with behavior students. Why would they want you to be certified in sped for these positions? I have experience working with special needs and behavior students and have enjoyed working with these kids. I don't want you guys to think I'm trying to get certified just to find a job. I have enough experience with special needs to know that it's not easy or a blow off position. You do have to have a heart for working with these kids and I do
dhteach is offline   Reply With Quote
mreinelt's Avatar
mreinelt mreinelt is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 146
Full Member

mreinelt
 
mreinelt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 146
Full Member
Tounce
Old 07-29-2009, 10:13 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

yes, in the state of TX if you have a teaching degree all you have to do to add new certifications to your current one is take the EXIT test....However, you better know your information and some tests if you don't have experience you will miss the question...Also, some of the tests are extremely difficulty that even those who profecient in the subject fail.
mreinelt is offline   Reply With Quote
kbach kbach is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member

kbach
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 229
Full Member
Special Ed
Old 07-30-2009, 06:38 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I would assume they want you to be certified because many of your students will have IEPs and fall under the "special education" umbrella. NCLB requires "highly qualified" teachers and if you have kiddos that qualify for special education services then they want someone "qualified" in special education. These days many colleges prepare graduates to alter lessons and make accomodations or modifications of lesson even if they plan to teach "basic" ed. However remember, there are still basic ed teachers out here that do not understand how to deal with kids that have differences, or teach them. You and I both know a test won't do that but the test will cover the district's butt if your qualifications are brought into question.

Good luck with the test! I wish I still had the study guide on my computer but unfortunately I lost it when my computer crashed. I think the guide was just a few dollars. I googled the vocabulary used in the questions. Honestly I think spent just a couple of hours studying.
kbach is offline   Reply With Quote
newspedteach newspedteach is online now
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member

newspedteach
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member

Old 07-30-2009, 07:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Quote:
One of the positions was a resource reading lab for intermediate age children and another was working with behavior students. Why would they want you to be certified in sped for these positions?
I started to write this yesterday, but I lost my post....

Anyway, I assume you need a sped degree for these positions because these are students with disabilities you'll be working with?? You will need to be highly qualified to teach them.

I see a PP has stated what I was going to say, but I also want to add that I am offended that all that is needed is a test in some states to call yourself a special ed. teacher. The test was nothing and teaches you nothing...I used my common sense for most of the questions. My training was so far beyond what a general ed. teacher receives...I'm glad my state requires the degree/training as well as the test.
newspedteach is online now   Reply With Quote
grace slick
 
 
Guest

grace slick
 
 
Guest
certification
Old 07-31-2009, 02:34 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

I agree with newspedteach coming form the north where my special ed curriculum was far more than regular ed to TX where all you have to do is take a test...I was quite upset....Espcially now in the job market that is flooded by special ed teachers...That is only half the problem once you are in a school you don't get the respect of the other teachers because they believe that you only took a test...It really tires my patience. and if my husband every found a job North I would retun to the land of respect for individual differences....But what can you expect from a state who still believes that Bush was the best president we ever had...Strange i know
  Reply With Quote
cl2485 cl2485 is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member

cl2485
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member
Okay
Old 07-31-2009, 06:26 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

You can't just be some bum off the street and become a special ed teacher here. You already have to have a teacher's certificate in order to take on any other certifications. These are called "endorsements" in other states. I had extensive training and had many opportunities to gain experience in special education throughout my college years, so that I would be more prepared for my job (even though everyone learns more in their first year of teaching than they do their entire college experience). I wouldn't hold it against someone if they originally thought they wanted to be an English or math teacher but had a change of heart and wanted to teach SPED instead. So now they're going to take a test to be able to that. They have classroom management skills and the heart of a teacher already. Now, there will obviously be a learning curve and they will need to have further professional development for the ins and outs of SPED, but the district they work for will provide that, as well as the other teachers in their department.

You went from trying to give advice to trashing an entire state in a very short amount of time. Let's not do that anymore.

Wow.
cl2485 is offline   Reply With Quote
newspedteach newspedteach is online now
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member

newspedteach
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member
test vs. training
Old 07-31-2009, 09:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

No one said anything about a bum off the street??

Can you agree though, that it's ridiculous to one day be a gen. ed. teacher and the next, add that sped endorsement with one test?

In my state and I would assume in most, the sped training for a general ed. teacher is very minimal. I think they are trying to add some more sped classes here in my state, but right now, they have to take ONE OR TWO sped info classes. It would be ridiculous to take a test and 'Voila', you are a special ed. teacher now. It's offensive to those of us who worked for our sped degrees.

Quote:
They have classroom management skills and the heart of a teacher already. Now, there will obviously be a learning curve and they will need to have further professional development for the ins and outs of SPED, but the district they work for will provide that, as well as the other teachers in their department.
General classroom management skills are vastly different from behavior management skills for students with disabilities. Would you not agree? Vastly different.... Also, you are a very lucky person if your district offers professional dev. for the "ins and outs" of sped??? You are expected to be ready to teach if you are hired here as a sped teacher. Sure there are trainings every once in awhile, but these are tech trainings for new sped software, etc...not the basics of special ed. You are expected to know what you are doing from day one....which wouldn't be a problem if you've received proper training.

That all being said, I never blamed the teachers that do this. It's certainly not their fault they can just take a test and add an endorsement. I do feel for them and the students they will teach, because they will be completely overwhelmed w/o proper training, and their students will not get what they need right away.

Ok, I will add that there are many fabulous gen. ed teachers who could do my job without the endorsement. But, there is a huge learning curve, even with all the training and schooling and student teaching, etc...and it would take quite some time to get up to speed. AND, we won't even talk paperwork.....
newspedteach is online now   Reply With Quote
GSP GSP is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 2
New Member

GSP
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 2
New Member
The hardest part for me
Old 08-02-2009, 10:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

was the questions on the 3 year olds and older (could be out of HS) kids. This was something I had never encountered teaching a regular education class with inclusion students. Yes, I was a regular ed teacher, who too got my degree from Texas Tech, that took a test and crossed over. I had nine years of reg. ed before I became special ed. It is the most rewarding job I have ever had. I have 2nd and 3rd grade life skills and it is amazing how they excel. I expect alot and in turn get alot. I know alot of bad teachers that are highly educated in the field they teach. Follow your heart. If you love your kids you will find the ways to challenge them and help them be successful. You just have to be patient and creative in doing so.


It will make you more marketable if you have your ESL. I know my district is encouraging everyone to get it. I took this test @ 5 years ago. Then it was like the professional dev. test, mostly situational. It was mainly common sense. I did have a friend who took it around the same time and she had some trouble. She said her's had a lot of law questions. Hope this helps!
GSP is offline   Reply With Quote
cl2485 cl2485 is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member

cl2485
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
New Member
Very lucky
Old 08-03-2009, 10:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

Yes, I absolutely am lucky to be working where I work. I have an amazing support system here at my school. The district is very good at providing training for their teachers, and surprisingly (because we usually get left out of the equation), their sped teachers as well.

I completely agree that training is vital to being a sped teacher, but I also think that experience is just as important. It's hard to get experience in sped if you are already a working teacher, or have graduated already in a different field, so you need that certification to get a job in sped to get experience. I know that probably isn't worded in the best way, but that's the way it is sometimes.

I was hired at my school because of my qualifications, but I'll just tell you that in no way was I prepared in college for what I gained experience in this past semester in my classroom. Let's just have a short rundown of SOME of the highlights:
- severe grand mal seizures that had no external aura (and with nonverbal students, that would help)
- a 16 year old (yes, in middle school...how that happened is beyond me), also nonverbal, who was over 6 ft. tall and about 200 pounds, on as many medications as his age (HORRIBLE), and who I had to help admit to the psych ward at the local hospital on 4 separate occasions from mid-January to the end of May because of his violent behavior (broke a teacher's forearm, gave a para a concussion with a head butt, choked another para, broke another teacher's thumb...these were the events that allowed us to admit him straight from the school), yet he was still able to be in public school instead of residential for a little while, no matter how hard we tried to prove this was necessary to regulate meds. He was a loaded situation, and I could never touch on everything I went through with him, but despite it, I'll miss him now that he's going to high school next year.
-a hearing impaired student, nonverbal, has a cochlear implant that doesn't work majority of the time, doesn't know sign language for communication purposes (what?!), and parents absolutely don't want her to use picture communication, which by the way, is a staple of my classroom.
-a 13 yr old student who is completely mislabeled with Autism, but really he is severe MR that is developmentally at about 9 months old, and if he stays in the same type of class as mine in high school will definitely be injured by the other students in his class, based solely on the fact that he has a snail's pace reaction time. He has a sweet mother who will be hard to convince that he needs to be in a lower-level class, mostly because no one wants to hear that, and also benefits of keeping the AU label for after he is released from public school outweigh not having them obviously.
-getting so attached to my students and wanting them to reach their full and absolute potential...getting attached was something I didn't realize really happened until the end of the year when I put them on the bus the last day of school and cried...I don't cry, so that was pretty out of nowhere. No matter what I went through with them, I wanted to come back everyday. Still do...can't wait for the new school year to start

There's no way I could have EVER learned how to handle the many situations I have been faced with this semester. I knew what I was getting myself into because they were very honest during the interview, but telling me about it doesn't help me problem-solve. I had never encountered anything like my students throughout college, but I think it's rare that anyone does.

This post is extremely too long and I obviously got way too off topic for words, but back to the point, experience is something you're only going to get if you're teaching. Things like what I've done are not going to be seen during a student teaching experience for most people. Also, I understand my classroom is pretty extreme, but the point is that experience is just as important as training.

Jeez, sorry for taking over the post. This belongs somewhere else for sure. I apologize, but I'm going to post it anyway...oops
cl2485 is offline   Reply With Quote
newspedteach newspedteach is online now
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member

newspedteach
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,809
Senior Member
Thanks
Old 08-04-2009, 08:23 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

for posting that .

I think there is just a misunderstanding here and I didn't make myself clear .

I never meant to imply that classes, training in the way of practicums, student teaching, etc. completely prepares a sped teacher for what she/he will come in contact with. I completely agree with you here!!!

I too have had some pretty severe cases (mostly behavior) in my first two years of being a special ed. teacher. My first year especially was a real eye opener and I did come up against things I didn't remember being covered in school or during student teaching. But my training has come into play many times in the past two years. I learned how to write IEP's, FBA's, BIP's, document behaviors, etc...and was able to put what I learned into play when I had my own students. Although all districts/schools approach these things differently (thus you can't teach everything in teacher programs) my training gave me a good base from which to draw from. I can't imagine not having training for what I do, even though I agree that I've learned more from my 'on the job' training than I ever could have at school (and I'm sure this is true for every teacher). I am sure though, that I would be much further behind right now if I hadn't had the training.

I have serious doubts whether most districts give inexperienced teachers enough ongoing training to be proficient at their jobs, but I agree, if you do get that you are very lucky!

You sound like a fabulous teacher who works very hard. Sounds like you are doing a great job. Your students are very lucky to have you!!
newspedteach is online now   Reply With Quote
SPED27 SPED27 is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
New Member

SPED27
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
New Member
Certification test
Old 12-14-2009, 04:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

Not sure if it makes you more marketable but, I have heard that schools are in high demand for SPED,ESL, Science and Math Teachers. I am here and TX and studying the field hope to take the TExEs SPED exam soon. I would just say study for it if you want and see were it takes you.
SPED27 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:56 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net