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2teachis2lrn
 
 
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2teachis2lrn
 
 
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Help with autistic student
Old 11-29-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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Hi,
I have a student whose behaviors have become increasingly worse and I blame myself because I haven't responded the right way. Basically, the main concern is that she is continually running from the instructional area. I feel that it is very attention seeking in nature as she is looking back for a reaction. The problem is when I attempt to ignore, she goes to one of the two classroom doors in my classroom which I can't ignore. I have tried to physically prompt her by taking her hand and leading her to the instructional area but then she pulls at me and fights. I am concerned because as she becomes more frustrated, she also becoming more physical.
One thing I have been doing during instructional times is to provide a fidget toy, alternate seating, and also working on setting a timer for approximately 30 seconds ( give a puzzle piece). Once she has placed the 2 puzzle pieces on the board, she may leave instructional area to complete a task. I'll admit I haven't seen much success with this yet because I don't think she understands yet that in completing the puzzle, she gets what she wants. ( to leave the area). Anyway, any ideas you have would be greatly appreciated. ( BTW, she is verbal but not functionally for the most part; echolalia)


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acorngirl acorngirl is offline
 
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see if you can
Old 11-30-2010, 06:35 PM
 
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find small SMALL incremental areas for positive reinforcement. Maybe reinforce with stickers or m&ms or something like that. Make it SUPER successful right now. Then build.

Can you give her scripts? http://www.autisminspiration.com/pub...partment47.cfm here is a website with a bunch of them. You have to instruct her how to use them on specific instances. For example, if she's frustrated, hot, cold, etc. She may not know how to communicate with you. And, having that script (and I've had success with putting it on notecards on a ring for her to carry), can help.

You may also want to provide pictures for her emotions, things she likes, dislikes, rules, procedures, etc. If you have boardmaker, or access to it, you can find a TON of this stuff. You can create a communication board, so to speak, for this student. While she can speak, she's not able to communicate.

I had a student who was like that, and it's incredibly difficult to work with someone like that. They can't tell you what's wrong, what they like, what is going on, etc. He responded well to the scripts, but we also would resort to pictures, and sometimes, when he got really frustrated, he'd start to quote disney movies. We learned to figure out what those meant (they usually would tell us how he was feeling, but we'd have to speculate). But, with really specific coaching with the speech language path, we were able to figure out how to work with him in some ways.

I really recommend you spend time with your SLP. For this school year, communication and language may be the focus, not academics. yes, you'll have to teach skills, but with a language focus.

Good luck, and if I can help you more, let me know!
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2teachs2learn 2teachs2learn is offline
 
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Old 12-01-2010, 01:59 AM
 
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Thank you so much for replying. I am going to try some of the scripts. Great site! I'll keep you posted. Fingers crossed!
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acorngirl acorngirl is offline
 
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:)
Old 12-01-2010, 05:11 PM
 
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Good luck! Non-verbal autistic kids are SO hard. I wish you lots of luck!
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cl2485 cl2485 is offline
 
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Can you...
Old 12-14-2010, 08:31 PM
 
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put some sort of "baby-proof" handle on the door?? On each of my classroom doors, I have one of those plastic covers that you have to squeeze 2 points of the cover to grasp the handle and open it. I am a self-contained LIFE Skills teacher, so I definitely have runners/escapers and this physical modification absolutely helps my situation. I have kids that are trying to escape the environment/task, so I just let them try their hearts out to leave the room, then they finally give up and come back to sit down for their work because they can't figure out how to manipulate the handle to get out. I have trouble sometimes too! At school and at home HAHA (my daughter is 1.5 years old).

There is a "baby-proof" device for every type of door handle and door.

If it's a cabinet that has materials that are unsafe without supervision, they have that too. If it's a cabinet with small handles on the outside of each door, you can get a bunch of those little plastic zip-ties for cheap. You can cut them when you need to get in and then put a new one on to lock it back up.

I don't know if this will help your situation, but knowing that a child cannot get into anything that will harm them will put your mind at ease to continue your planned ignoring. She will rev up her behavior and see that you are ignoring her, but she will always know that she can get your attention by going to that door. Eventually, she will go straight to the door because that will enable her to get instant gratification.


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