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Do resource (pull-out) classes still exist where you are?

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Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
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Do resource (pull-out) classes still exist where you are?
Old 01-08-2017, 12:54 AM
 
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When I was in college I did field placements in many, many schools and all of them were "full inclusion" for mild/moderate students. I hate "co-teaching." I feel like a glorified para. Most of the schools in my home state were actually set up well for it (one sped teacher per grade level or maybe 2 grade levels), and even then the sped teacher was always acting as an aide. After I graduated I vowed to only do gen ed because I wanted to be the teacher! Unfortunately that didn't work out and I could only find a SPED position, but I was thrilled to see that my current state still has resource. I like doing my small groups all day. Unfortunately, "full inclusion" is catching on here. Many districts have already started doing push-in instead of pull-out and my district leadership is really pushing hard for it. My principal and assistant principal have been very supportive of me continuing to teach my pull-out classes; they agree that push-in is not a good use of my skills. However, I just found out that my P is leaving and I have a hunch that AP will not stay either, so I will have no choice but to do services the way the district wants.

I've thought about trying to get another job, but unfortunately I just don't feel like resource exists anywhere anymore. I'm afraid that even if I were lucky enough to find a district still doing it, that would change very soon. What about where you are? If resource is still around, do you think it will stay that way? If there is somewhere where it's definitely still popular, I'd love to hear the location! I absolutely loathe doing push-in and don't think I could handle doing that as a career. I would seriously consider moving if I could find the job I wanted somewhere else.


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Old 01-08-2017, 06:47 AM
 
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In our district last year they said they would be doing away with pull out and doing inclusion.And of course NO training or help to our schools with how to implement it with the staff we have . So each school is now doing inclusion the best way they can. There is no support in my county. Top down management who live in an ivory tower up in the clouds.
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Inclusion in my District
Old 01-08-2017, 07:10 AM
 
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My district uses the inclusion model.

When the second grade teacher is teaching reading groups, the special ed teacher is in that room also teaching reading to her students. However, there are four second grades, so the special ed students in those rooms also come to the room that has the most second grade special ed students to work with the special ed teacher at the same time.

Not all these students are at the same level, so the special ed teacher is working with several groups just like the regular ed teacher. The special ed students also work with the regular ed teacher so they get a double dose of reading each day. If the classroom has regular ed students who have not yet qualified for special ed but are working at the same level as the special ed groups, they also join the special ed teacher's groups when she is teaching her special ed students.

This model works the same way for math.

In my opinion, the way the model is used in my school is more like a self-contained model except for location. The location is the regular classroom rather than the special ed room. The special ed teacher has a cart she uses for her materials.

I think it would be very important that you make an inclusion model work for you. You are not a glorified aide. You would need to assert yourself so the regular ed teachers use you as you were met to be used.
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Old 01-08-2017, 07:19 AM
 
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Move south. We still use pull out. I don't know how it would possibly work otherwise. My school only has 2 sped teachers. One for primary, and one for intermediate. Other schools have larger needs and have additional resources.

We do inclusion in the afternoons for science and social studies, but it has been a long time since I have had anyone other than an ea in my class for that. One teacher can't go with every kid from 3 grade levels! They usually go where the need is the greatest. I also think most of our teachers are open to having sped teachers lead lessons they are interested in if they want. I know the primary teacher teaches some lessons and artistic endeavors because of her interests. I would be open to that as long as it fit into my curriculum needs.
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pull out model
Old 01-08-2017, 10:05 AM
 
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My area is going towards full inclusion because the state says that we have too many SPED minutes on the IEP. We still have pull out classes though. What's interesting is that there are some kids who are doing very well in the inclusion model (likely because they are closer to gen ed abilities than resource) and others who are slowly being put back into the pull out classes because the inclusion classes are too hard. The resources classes are now quite full, so it's no longer a small environment.

I think when inclusion is the only way, it leaves out the "I" in IEP. It should be individualized and some kids just do better with the pull out model.


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Old 01-08-2017, 12:15 PM
 
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I teach resource 1-2 ELA from 8:30 - 11:00.
12:30 - dismissal 3 - 5 ELA.
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Old 01-08-2017, 01:13 PM
 
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The state said we had too many kids in self-contained and too many special ed kids over all.

Our resource teachers have advocated for and got direct instruction blocks once a day per grade level for about 30 minutes each for reading and math. It is unusual for a resource kid to have both.

Other than study hall/study skills (20 minutes) the students and teachers are doing inclusion.

The kids who can handle inclusion only often end up being dismissed out of special ed all together.

The big complaint in our building is that the special ed aides and teachers "just sit" in regular ed. IMO our building administration (not special ed administration) needs to be more actively involved in making inclusion work.

Things like differentiation, small group, centers and co-teaching are not addressed and perceived as not valued. "Those kids" have IEPs and are not considered gen ed's problem.

FWIW at least 35 percent of our building has an IEP.
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Old 01-08-2017, 01:59 PM
 
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My district brought in some apparently well-known co-teaching "guru" to do some training at the beginning of the year. The first thing out of her mouth was that it only works with the sped teacher is matched with one or two gen ed teachers, and that 3 or 4 is "really pushing it." My teammate went up to the district person that brought in this training and asked her how we could possibly implement this when we work with 10-12 gen ed teachers each. The district person said, "Just do what you can." Kahlua, we also only have 2 sped teachers and we're a K-6 building, so I have 4 grade levels. Two other elementary buildings in our district only have 1 teacher. We're currently the only building in the district that hasn't started doing it. One building is supposed to be the building that houses "moderate needs" for the entire district, so they have 10x the sped staff that anyone else does. They have at least one teacher and one aide per grade level, and it's a small school to begin with, so they can implement it more as it's meant to be done. The other two elementary schools that only have one teacher have just drastically cut IEP minutes. I recently had a student who moved to one of the "co-teaching" buildings. She is in 2nd grade, a complete non-reader, and was literally working on learning letter names and sounds as well as numbers 1-20. She moved literally the day before her IEP meeting and I was planning on giving her 6 hours per week of pull-out since she's so low. Since the other school didn't know her, I went and held the IEP meeting with them at their school. They gave her 90 minutes per week of push-in only. Our sped director is saying that since co-teaching is "better," it's okay that the kids will have less minutes. I work in an extremely low SES district. Although my kids are supposed to be "mild needs," my average student is 2-4 grade levels behind. I have maybe 2 students on my entire caseload that I think push-in would be better for, and like readandweep said, I think those kids will be exited from sped all together when their meetings come up at the end of the year.

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In my opinion, the way the model is used in my school is more like a self-contained model except for location. The location is the regular classroom rather than the special ed room. The special ed teacher has a cart she uses for her materials.
Connie, I have always said that if forced to do push-in I would try to do it this way. At least I would still be teaching. IMO, I still think this model is ridiculous. I currently have my own classroom. My students need a quiet environment to learn best (about 40% of my kids also have ADHD). I also do a ton of multisensory activities, including having kids up and moving constantly (stand on this side of the room if you think the answer is A, this side if you think it's B, etc.) I couldn't do those activities if I'm stuck trying to do my group in a gen ed room. I think it's ridiculous for them to basically expect me to run the exact same small group I'd run in my own room in the back of the gen ed room just so we can brag to other adults that we're "full inclusion." I also use TONS of materials and IMO it's disrespectful to ask someone to "teach from a cart" when a room is available.

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The big complaint in our building is that the special ed aides and teachers "just sit" in regular ed. IMO our building administration (not special ed administration) needs to be more actively involved in making inclusion work.
I could definitely see this happening in my building. It takes A LOT of planning time to do any sort of "real" co-teaching where both teachers are actively involved in whole group, IMO. With the numbers we have it would be impossible for me to spend that amount of time planning with each teacher. IME with schools that had more sped staff and the sped teacher was available for planning, the gen ed teacher was not willing to spend all of that extra time planning each lesson to be co-taught when she could plan for herself 10x faster. A lot of what this "guru" explained that she did as the sped teacher seems to be a giant waste of my skills, and a giant waste of even my para's skills, IMO. She talked about things like walking around passing out highlighter tape for kids that needed something specific called to their attention, organizing student materials for them so they could follow along with the lesson, etc.

We currently only have about 15% identified for SPED, but some grade levels have heavier caseloads than others. Right now I have 12 2nd graders. I can't imagine a gen ed teacher wanting to take on all 12 so that she could get maybe 90 minutes per day of support from me. Not to mention, we'd have to put all "at-risk" kids in her class as well in case they got identified later in the year. That would be an entire class full of the lowest kids with minimal extra support. How is that best for kids either?

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I teach resource 1-2 ELA from 8:30 - 11:00.
12:30 - dismissal 3 - 5 ELA.
Where is this? Is it typical for your area or just the way your schools do things? Do you see this model continuing in your area?
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More push-in, very little pull out services
Old 01-08-2017, 06:00 PM
 
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The principal at my school (it varies by schools in our district here in Nevada) supports as much inclusion as possible. So we have intervention blocks where students comes to the resource room every day. The remainder of my day is spent providing push in services. It works, to a point. I am able to meet all the reading/writing minutes my kids need, but I'm having trouble meeting math minutes. I'm thankful that I work with some great gen. ed teachers that allow me to work with my kids in a small group setting within their room. I'm a new teacher, I started the week before Christmas break, and don't want to make waves. However, it's frustrating. I'm not 100% sure I'm really giving my kids all they need. I know it probably doesn't help you, however it makes me feel a little better that other teachers are experiencing the same thing I am.
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I hear ya!
Old 01-09-2017, 05:28 AM
 
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I'm in the northeast and some districts still have pull out, resource. I'm a relatively new teacher (in my third year) and since my license is in SPED only I did a lot of field placements and student teaching in many different districts.

Definitely the push seems to be for "inclusion" but you will always have those kids who that is just not suitable for. My current district has what you describe now - a special education co-teacher for each grade level, but then there is also a resource teacher (me) who does pull out groups. However, my pull out groups put my kids into the "partial inclusion" category as I have them for at least 2 hours a day. So, it's a little more intense than the traditional resource room pull out model but my kids have more moderate disabilities.

The district I am moving to is much larger than the one I am in now. They have several models for special education - programs for students with PDD, programs for students with specific learning disabilities. etc. There is lots of room to choose what you'd like.

So, if you're looking to stay in resource, I'd try to find a large district, see what their programs look like and apply!


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All over
Old 01-12-2017, 01:38 AM
 
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It's in the large inner cities too. Inclusion is a way districts think they will save money. They won't need as many special ed teachers. And, yes, I believe a lot of kids don't get their needed minutes. I had to do inclusion in high school one year. In some classes, the kids don't want any help from the special ed teacher. They get embarrassed and angry. They also get more frustrated when the work is too hard. I had to find technology to help them survive. Some of it was having their books on the computer so they could listen to the words being read. I had some 12th graders who couldn't read very well and had even more trouble comprehending it. I had to differentiate some of their work on the spot. Like having less choices for multiple choice tests. I would have to ask for the materials or answer keys so I could have them do the work ahead of time or later. Some teachers wouldn't cooperate. But it's not up to them, it's what is best for the students. Administration needs to back you up!! An IEP is the law. Teachers can be sued for not following it. Administration needs to require the gen ed teachers attend IEP meetings. Those in middle school or high school would get the info in writing if all couldn't make it. Some schools had us make the gen ed sign that they saw the documents. Then they needed to ask questions if they didn't understand. There's a shift to make gen ed teachers more responsibile for all their students. Makes me wonder if someday there won't be gen ed and spec ed teachers-just gen ed with more specialized training to help all students. Remember if you're a sped teacher you don't need to ask permission to do something just because you're in a gen ed setting. The rooms are actually the schools and not just for one teacher any more. The number 1 way to succeed at inclusion is to have time to meet together.
I've been both kinds of teachers so I do understand both sides.
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Old 01-13-2017, 09:40 PM
 
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Administration needs to require the gen ed teachers attend IEP meetings. Those in middle school or high school would get the info in writing if all couldn't make it. Some schools had us make the gen ed sign that they saw the documents. Then they needed to ask questions if they didn't understand.
I think this is more of a secondary issue (from what I hear). At least in the elementary schools I've worked in, it would be unheard of for a gen ed teacher to not attend the IEP meeting and stay for the entire time. We're not allowed to have the meeting without the gen ed teacher, and theoretically (this has never actually happened because they'd be in HUGE trouble) if they tried to leave early we'd have to stop the meeting.

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Remember if you're a sped teacher you don't need to ask permission to do something just because you're in a gen ed setting. The rooms are actually the schools and not just for one teacher any more. The number 1 way to succeed at inclusion is to have time to meet together.
I know that there is a lot of lip service given to both teachers being equal, but in reality unless both teachers are in the same room 100% of the day that simply isn't true. Again, this is perhaps an elementary thing because teachers have the same class all day long. If Ms. Jones is the classroom teacher and spending 6-7 hours per day with those students, spending her own time/money setting up and maintaining the room, planning all of the lessons, etc. it is "her" room. It doesn't suddenly also become Ms. Smith's room equally because she steps in for an hour per day. The sad truth is that in this setting the gen ed teacher will always be viewed by everyone as the "real" teacher. I find that most schools are also not set up for teachers to meet together b/c they have sped staff working with too many gen ed teachers. I currently work with 12 teachers. Even if they "clustered" my kids into one class per grade level, that's still four teachers. There is no way I could meet with 4 teachers/grade levels every day in order to do any kind of "real" co-teaching with both teachers equally planning and teaching. I've been a gen ed teacher also and I would happily "co-teach" if I was the gen ed teacher, because the gen ed teacher is the "real" teacher that gets all the power.

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I know it probably doesn't help you, however it makes me feel a little better that other teachers are experiencing the same thing I am.
It actually does help! It's nice to know I'm not the only one!
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:22 AM
 
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We still do resource where I am and there haven't been any major pushes to change it, but I still worry that it will change within the next 10 years. I too would be very sad.
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Old 01-15-2017, 04:22 PM
 
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In my last district (since I'm now out of the classroom), I worked at several different schools. Some did resource only, and others did full inclusion OR self-contained classroom. None of them did resource AND self-contained or inclusion. In one of those schools (a huge elementary with over 1K kids k-5), several teachers were pushing for resource. They tried using the self-contained room as a resource of sorts, but it got complicated (as you may imagine). The inclusion classrooms were set up as co-teaching models (1 sped, 1 gened, 1 para). Some of them worked very well and were truly cooperative teaching, and in some, the sped teachers were more like paras. In others, it was like a classroom within a classroom and got kind of ridiculous (why have two classrooms in one classroom at ALL times? It got distracting for everyone).
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Pull out
Old 02-08-2017, 06:07 AM
 
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We use primarily pull-out, but there are some periods when the Resource teacher pushes in. This is usually the case if a few students in the same class need extra minutes. We have two Resource teachers - 1 primary and 1 4/5; one "Special Day" class for those who are severely impaired; one upper grades "Vistas" (or something like that) for kids who have diagnosed behavior issues like severe emotionally disturbed. These kids are mainstreamed into the regular classroom with a full-time aide as they are ready. I currently have a 5th grade boy in my class with an aide for only about 45 minutes a day. He also joins enrichment with my class.
We are always looking for good SPED people in my district in Tahoe!
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