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kinderlady7 kinderlady7 is offline
 
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kinderlady7
 
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Ideas for intervention time with struggling students
Old 01-11-2020, 01:11 PM
 
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Hello!

I am a first year teacher and I am struggling to come up with ideas to help my struggling learners during small group intervention time. This is the very last portion of our day so if my kids are not engaged, they are a HANDFUL.

We have "learned" all of our letters whole group and are beginning to focus on building/blending, but with these students I am still working on letter/sound recognition. We have done TONS of letter searches, flashcards, books (to color that help with letter recognition), roll and read games, and they are bored and still not getting it!

Anything that has worked really well with your struggling students in the past? 3 of my 16 are still only identifying about 13 letters each time!!!! I know we need to continue to improve!!! Thanks!!


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ElizabethJoy ElizabethJoy is offline
 
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Letter/sound revision
Old 01-14-2020, 03:50 AM
 
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I'm not 100% sure how your intervention time works, or what is required, so I can only comment based on my own experience. Personally,I don't think you can help a struggling learner very effectively unless you know WHY they are struggling Sometimes it's developmental and we are expecting too much. In my experience, kids who start kinder at 4 are often labelled 'behind' when they're really just young. Other times there are specific issues you can work on. With letter recognition, I have found it's often a visual memory thing, especially if they're also finding it difficult to learn sight words.

I had two kids in my class last year who were slow to learn their letters due to poor visual memory. Instead of stressing them out with constant revision of letters and sounds, I used games to work on visual memory. Activities like;

*Playing memory (matching pairs)
*Tracking a marble hidden under one of 3 identical cups as the cups get moved around
*Looking at an artwork for 30 seconds, then having to answer questions without getting to look at it (what colours was the girls dress, how many dogs were there etc.)
*Missing object game. (a numer of objects on a tray, child closes their eyes while the teacher removes one, they have to name the missing object)

When we did practice their letters in targeted small groups, I tried to engage as many senses and as much movement as possible e.g.

*Saying the sound over and over again while writing it in a salt tray, with shaving cream, or in finger-paint.
*Cutting and pasting images with the initial sound onto a bubble written copy of the matching letter
*Getting the kiddos to write the letters on a partner's back while the partner guesses the sound
*'Elephant writing' the sounds in the air with their 'invisible pencils'- basically just their arms clasped together.
*I draw letters on their palms while they look away and guess the sound. Then they draw letters on my palm whilst I guess.

Another thing is, instead of constantly drilling letters in isolation, the majority of our letter/sound revision happens in the context of decoding CVC words in text and I do a lot of it whole class. For my higher kids, it's fluency. For my low ones, it's letter/sound revision. Either way, it benefits all my students.

Also- I LOVE Alphablocks. It is the ONLY youtube-type thing I really use since I am not a fan of too much screen time for little ones, but it is truly brilliant. If you live in the UK, Australia or NZ you should check it out. I'm not sure how useful it would be in the US since the vowel sounds might be a bit too different, but you could give it a try.

I hope some of these ideas help! Good luck
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Old 01-14-2020, 04:44 PM
 
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First, the last part of the day is a really hard time to engage kids, especially if they are the strugglers! So don't be down on yourself if they are hard to keep focused.


I try to make things as hands on and kinesthetic as possible. Flash cards and papers just don't do it for them. Get letters to move and manipulate, have them write in sand or shaving cream, play games that get them up and jumping and moving. Often times they need to involve their whole body to help it stick.


I'm not a huge fan of using screens, but the Leapfrog Letter Factory is fantastic. It reviews letters and sounds. My own children learned most of their letters and sounds with this video when they were 3.



ElizabethJoy had lots of good suggestions. Good luck!
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