Staff child - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Staff child

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
learn's Avatar
learn learn is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 813
Senior Member

learn
 
learn's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 813
Senior Member
Staff child
Old 10-25-2020, 11:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hello PT
Have a staff’s child in my class. The child is sweet and respectful but can be quite sassy at times. However the latest is that the student speaks out loud and states how her mom teaches a lesson better ....
How do I best handle this?


learn is offline   Reply With Quote

teenytiny's Avatar
teenytiny teenytiny is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,340
Senior Member

teenytiny
 
teenytiny's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,340
Senior Member

Old 10-25-2020, 12:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Well, you said the child was sweet and respectful, but this behavior is neither of those. The child is being very disrespectful and rude to you. This is a teachable moment about the power of words and how they affect others. When she says something like that, tell her that although you agree that her mother is a wonderful teacher, that what she said to you was disrespectful and hurtful.

Have a class discussion about how it is ok to think whatever thoughts you want to, but not every thought needs to be spoken. Words you say have an impact on others, and you need to stop and think about how your words might make another person feel.

Do you have the book called "Have You Filled A Bucket Today"? It would be a good one to bring out and reread.
teenytiny is offline   Reply With Quote
Teacherbee_4 Teacherbee_4 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,596
Senior Member

Teacherbee_4
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,596
Senior Member
Co-Worker's child
Old 10-25-2020, 12:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

First, can I just say I feel for you? I have a co-worker's child, too. I hate having co-worker's children. So far mine is working out fine, but it always makes me anxious.

Second, I REALLY REALLY love the advice of the previous poster.
Teacherbee_4 is online now   Reply With Quote
BioBirdie BioBirdie is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 81
Junior Member

BioBirdie
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 81
Junior Member
Good advice
Old 10-25-2020, 01:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Given above, but I would also talk with the child's parent. I teach in a small district that my own kids attend. Coworkers have taught my kids and I've taught several of theirs. I would talk to the parent, who might be flattered their child thinks so highly of them but also being a teacher would understand. I had to call a coworker about their child's behavior just last week. It helped so much. Good luck.
BioBirdie is offline   Reply With Quote
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 22,316
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 22,316
Senior Member

Old 10-25-2020, 02:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I wouldn't do a whole group discussion since this seems to be a one child issue. That's like when the P sends out a whole building email that only applies to 1 or 2 teachers. We all talk about how nuts it makes us.

I'd pull the child aside and explain that just like each like each child in the class has different shoes and shoe sizes, teachers do things differently. I'd also ask why she feels like she has to say something. I'd ask why she feels like she has to make comments and how she'd feel if you said so and so did something better than she did. Make it a teachable moment and move on.

If she continues then it's time to bring the parents in.


GreyhoundGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

Old 10-25-2020, 03:45 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Honestly, I'd ignore such a comment. She said it to get a reaction. The best is to give none. IME, even having the group conversation can embolden this type because they see they got you. If she makes such comments again, I would nonchalantly say "If you're here, how would you know?". If she acts out, I would say "Then, let's ask your mother's opinion". IME, her mother might be at the root of it.
  Reply With Quote
eagles23's Avatar
eagles23 eagles23 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 5,477
Senior Member

eagles23
 
eagles23's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 5,477
Senior Member

Old 10-25-2020, 05:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

It sounds to me like she is parroting what she hears at home. Is her mom the type to tell her that she could teach the lesson better than you???
eagles23 is offline   Reply With Quote
anna's Avatar
anna anna is online now
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,689
Senior Member

anna
 
anna's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,689
Senior Member

Old 10-25-2020, 06:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I'd do a private discussion as some have mentioned here and keep it on a positive note. Discretion is an important skill as is learning that while feelings are important,there is a time and place for some feelings to be expressed. I've known my own kids' teachers and always asked the teachers to please treat my kids as any other student. I would definitely address this unkind behavior no matter which kid did it.
anna is online now   Reply With Quote
lte's mom's Avatar
lte's mom lte's mom is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,149
Senior Member

lte's mom
 
lte's mom's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,149
Senior Member

Old 10-25-2020, 07:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I had a staff student in my class who told me I should get a real job like her mom has...her mom is an assistant. I'm not bashing assistants because they are my heroes!
lte's mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Hawkeyegirl1 Hawkeyegirl1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 273
Full Member

Hawkeyegirl1
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 273
Full Member
Ignore it and then address it
Old 10-26-2020, 06:21 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I think I would ignore this this time, and if it comes up again (or something equally as disrespectful), I would pull the child aside and have a private discussion. I have taught many staff members' kids, and I always felt added pressure, but I tried to handle incidents the same way I would handle them with any other student.

I had a wonderful principal who once said, "Praise in public, criticize in private." (I actually don't think criticize was the word she used, but I can't remember the exact word.)


Hawkeyegirl1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Izzy23 Izzy23 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,837
Senior Member

Izzy23
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,837
Senior Member

Old 10-26-2020, 08:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Was it "praise in public, correct in private"? That's what we say around here! It's good advice.
Izzy23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Hawkeyegirl1 Hawkeyegirl1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 273
Full Member

Hawkeyegirl1
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 273
Full Member
Izzy23...
Old 10-26-2020, 09:13 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I think that's it! I try to live by her advice.❤
Hawkeyegirl1 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:38 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net