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Akward situation.
Old 06-08-2020, 05:13 PM
 
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So I have informally excepted a job at a school five minutes from my house. This just happened today so I haven't said anything to my other district and won't until I have signed a contract.

Thing is, I actually didn't plan to leave my current school, but working at a school that doesn't require me to commute 50 minutes a day makes since for my finances. This district will also pay me 3000 dollars more and there is also more resources available to me. All in all, a better fit.

I just don't know how to word a message to my current principal about getting my personal belongings from the classroom as well as returning my district provided laptop. Any words of wisdom? I plan to let them know as soon as I'm officially hired by my new district.


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Old 06-08-2020, 05:21 PM
 
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First off, congratulations!

I would be frank about it and just tell your p like you did us. It sounds like a perfect opportunity for you and honestly, unless your current school is just fabulous, you would be silly not to take the new job. It is stressful when first thinking about it, but you will feel so much better after you get it done.

Congrats!
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Old 06-08-2020, 05:53 PM
 
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Agree, say it straight out. You can say it is bittersweet, you are sad to be leaving but looking forward to the perks of a short commute, working at a neighborhood school, etc. You probably should do it over the phone, and ask your principal what is the best way to hand in your laptop, at her convenience, etc.
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Old 06-08-2020, 07:38 PM
 
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Congratulations!

Dear Principal,

This letter serves to announce my resignation effective ____.

Although I enjoyed my time at X school, this new opportunity is a better fit for me personally.

Please let me know when I can access the school to get my belongings from my classroom and turn in my laptop.
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New Job
Old 06-08-2020, 07:43 PM
 
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Remember that schools are businesses. People come and go quite frequently and it will be fine. Especially if youíre telling them NOW in the beginning of Summer!

Congratulations! Itís so exciting to have a new opportunity that will save you some money and put you closer to home! <3

Just be honest with your principal and say you were able to secure a position closer to home.


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Old 06-08-2020, 09:58 PM
 
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I would focus on the commute aspect since that's totally legitimate and not disparaging to your current school at all. I'd throw in a couple of lines about how much you enjoyed working there, you'll miss it, etc. but the long commute is taking too much of a financial toll.

I wouldn't just send a generic resignation letter with something like "found a better fit" because that could mean anything and the current school could take it negatively. It's always best not to burn bridges- you never know when you might need a reference or something from this school.

If you're close with the P and this may come as a surprise, you might call instead of emailing so you can explain in person. I would assume you'll still need to turn in an official letter of resignation but you'd be giving your P a heads up. After you communicate that you're leaving and why you can ask about check out procedures.
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Honesty
Old 06-09-2020, 03:50 AM
 
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I had a job I loved until someone I knew told me about a job in the next town over. I told my boss about the interview ahead of time. When I got to work after it, he asked how it went. I told him I thought he was in trouble, it was seven minutes from my house and it went well. He congratulated me. Most people understand the draw of a commute such as that!
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Old 06-09-2020, 06:43 AM
 
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I think your principal will be very understanding. I agree with the poster who said to focus on the commute aspect over just a general better fit statement. I also agree that over the phone might be best, followed up by an official letter to whomever it's supposed to go to. I would normally say in person, but I know we're all limiting contact right now.

Congratulations on the new job!
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My experience
Old 06-09-2020, 07:43 AM
 
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I left a job for a new job in the summer once. After I interviewed, I stopped by my then current school and told the principal that I interviewed and such and such. It happened to be a Catholic school and I was in public. I had a lot of reasons to leave, none of them would be very professional to share, so I just said after attending Catholic schools my whole life, I really miss being apart of them and wanted to go back. I let her know I was interviewing. When I go the job, I talked to her before I turned in my letter of resignation. I stopped by school but she took the afternoon off unexpectedly, so I called her (I had her cell phone because I was one of the "teachers in charge" when she was out of the building). I talked to her on the phone and she understood. I didn't even mention picking up my things, I just went in on my own time and picked up my things. I was hoping for a new job when we were still in school, and I was moving rooms anyway, if I stayed, so I specifically labeled boxes with two different symbols. One symbol were the schools things and 1 symbol was my personal things. It made it easy when I got the new job to just grab the boxes with the symbol.

As far as my district computer, I turned in my resignation and of course, I knew I would have to turn in my computer, and I was planning on doing that, but wanted to get things off of it. Well, HR was pissed I was leaving and within 5 minutes of dropping of my letter, she had her secretary send me a nasty note about how I needed to turn in all of my technology equipment ASAP and they were shutting off my accounts. I was a on the district tech team and worked very closely with the tech department, so I called one of them and he just laughed and said yeah, she really wants your account shut off and your things, but don't worry, I've got your back, get what you need off of your account, take your time, and drop it off before the summer ends. I won't shut off your account until you turn in your things. It took me a few days to get everything off my computer and google accounts that I wanted (plans, rubrics, pictures, evaluations, etc.). Then I turned it in.
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Maybe call not email?
Old 06-09-2020, 10:01 AM
 
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I suggest calling so you can get a response on how to come to your room, return laptop, etc. My principal admitted in a faculty zoom that he can't get through all his emails right now because there are so many offering services related to the pandemic, remote learning, etc. I sent an email 2 weeks ago that he just responded to yesterday, which isnt like him normally. Ask if the school needs your resignation in writing, signed letter vs email....but that you wanted to let them know ASAP thus the call. Just a suggestion. Congratulations!!!


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Old 06-09-2020, 12:25 PM
 
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Just be gracious in your formal resignation letter. After declaring your intent to resign and the date, add in how you enjoyed working with colleagues and the opportunities to grow as a professional. In the body of the email, thank your P and tell them you will be flexible with times to pick up your things. Maybe suggest times you would be available.
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